Content Curation World
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Content Curation World
What a Content Curator Needs To Know: How, Tools, Issues and Strategy
Curated by Robin Good
Author: Robin Good   Google+
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The Ideal Blogger's Workflow for Effectively Curating Online Content

The Ideal Blogger's Workflow for Effectively Curating Online Content | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



What are the key steps that a blogger should follow to effectively curate content online?


Silvya Rosenthal Tolisano shares her personal workflow to curate content as a blogger, by highlighting the seven key steps she suggests to go through when preparing content for a blog, 


  1. Find & Acquire
  2. Select & Filter
  3. Group, Organize & Arrange
  4. Editorialize, Contextualize & Annotate
  5. Create, Present, Transform & Remix
  6. Engage & Customize
  7. Share 


and by reminding those already doing it

a) not to "copy - paste" entire long passages from articles "as they are", but to rather share short portions to which personal commentary, evaluation or extra value must be added,


b) not to confuse long list of links or resources, for which there is often very little verification and analysis, let alone commentary and added value, with curation.  


The key element of curation is adding value, not collecting large amount of items on a topic. That's what a collector does, not a curator. 



Useful. Informative. Great illustration. 8/10



Original article: http://langwitches.org/blog/2014/06/15/blogging-as-a-curation-platform/ 


Reading time: 4'







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christa appleton's curator insight, June 25, 2014 6:18 AM

Great visual representation of blogging as curation

Jimun Gimm's curator insight, October 13, 2014 1:28 PM

당신의 통찰력을 추가 ...

Scooped by Robin Good
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Curation vs. Blogging: The Difference Is In The Focus

Curation vs. Blogging: The Difference Is In The Focus | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Robin Good: If curation is all about finding and sharing great content, what's the difference with what so many bloggers have been doing until now?

The difference, according to Deanna Dahlsad at Kitsch-Slapped, is in the focus. While bloggers often cover just about anything that intercepts their online wanderings, curators are characterized by a strong focus on a specific topic.  


Here is a key passage from her article: "Many bloggers spend their time selecting what they consider the best of what other people have created on the web and post it at their own sites, just like a magazine or newspaper.


Or they provide a mix of this along with writing or otherwise creating their own content. Not to split hairs, but curation involves less creation and more searching and sifting; curation’s more a matter of focused filtering than it is writing.


Because content curation is expected to be based on such focused filtering, it begins far more based on topic selection.


This is much different from blogging, where bloggers are often advised to “just begin” and let their voice and interests accumulate over time to eventually reveal a primary theme.


...


Some collectors just collect what they like as they stumble into it. …Sometimes, collectors just keep piling up stuff, no matter what it is. Even if this isn’t hoarding, it’s not-so-much of a purposeful pursuit.


But professional curators, those who manage collections for museums or other organizations, and serious collectors, they maintain a specific focus.


And rather than stumbling into items, they continually seek for specific items.


The definition dictates the curation — and everything from funding to their continued employment is based on how well their collection meets the collection’s definition.


While blogging success may be thought of in many different ways, the success of content curation lies in how well you define, search/research, and stick to your subject."


Rightful. 8/10


Full article: http://www.kitsch-slapped.com/2012/06/facts-questions-on-blogging-curating-collecting/ 

more...
Robin Good's comment, June 19, 2012 4:21 PM
Thank you Deanna for writing it!
AnneMarie Cunningham's curator insight, March 14, 2013 2:13 PM

another explanation of curation

Everett Hudson's comment, March 22, 2013 10:50 AM
you have great ideas. more please!
Rescooped by Robin Good from Curation Revolution
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Why I Don't Like Scoopit Links on Twitter

Why I Don't Like Scoopit Links on Twitter | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

I’m seeing more Scoopit links in my Twitter stream and I’m not crazy about it.  Sure it’s quick and easy to share with Scoopit.  But it not quick and easy to consume. For me it's all about the econ...

Marty Note (here is comment I wrote on Dr. V's blog)

Appreciate Bryan’s and Joseph’s comment, but I rarely use Scoop.it as a pass through. More than 90% of the time I’m adding “rich snippets” to content I Scoop.

Rich snippets are “blog” posts that fall between Twitter and the 500 to 1,000 words I would write in Scenttrail Marketing. I often create original content ON Scoop.it because whatever I’m writing falls in the crack between Twitter’s micro blog and what I think of as needing to be on my marketing blog.


I was taught NOT to pass through links on Scoop.it early on by the great curator @Robin Good . Robin has well over 1M views on Scoop.it now and his advice along with the patient advice of other great Scoop.it curators has my profile slouching toward 150,000 views.


Bryan is correct that some curators new to Scoop.it haven’t learned the Robin Good lesson yet. I agree it is frustrating to go to a link and not receive anything of value back, to simply need to click on another link. Curators who pass through links won’t scale, so the Darwinian impact will be they will learn to add value or die out.


For my part I always identify my Scoop.it links, probably about half the content I Tweet and about a quarter of my G+ shares. I also routinely share my favorite “Scoopiteers”, great content curators who taught me valuable lessons such as don’t simply pass through links but add “micro blogging” value via rich snippets.


When you follow or consistently share content from a great curator on Scooop.it you begin to understand HOW they shape the subjects they curate. I know, for example, Robin Good is amazing on new tools. Scoop.it anticipated this learning and built in a feature where I can suggest something to Robin.


This is when Scoop.it is at its most crowdsourcing best because I now have an army of curators who know I like to comment on and share content about design or BI or startups and they (other Scoopiteers) keep an eye out for me. There are several reasons Scoop.it is a “get more with less effort” tool and this crowdsourcing my curation is high on the list.


So, sorry you are sad to see Scoop.it links and understand your frustration. You’ve correctly identified the problem too – some curators don’t know how to use the tool yet. I know it is a lot to ask to wait for the Darwinian learning that will take place over generations, but Scoop.it and the web have “generations” that have the half life of a gnat so trust that the richness of the Scoop.it community will win in the end and “the end” won’t take long.


To my fellow Scoop.it curators we owe Bryan and Joseph thanks for reminding us of what Robin Good taught me – add value or your Scoop.it won’t scale. That lessons is applicable to much more than how we use Scoop.it.


Marty

Added to G+ too
https://plus.google.com/102639884404823294558/posts/TUsNtsAsjWp

 


Via Martin (Marty) Smith
Robin Good's insight:

Well, I can't really agree more with Marty's point.

On the other hand Scoop.it, and a number of similar platforms,  are heavily promoted as a content marketing platforms that promise to a) save you time and b) allow you to post more content.

And then, unless you heavily moderate and surface editorial models that can guide other users, you tend to level down to the lowest common denominator. 

This is what I see happening and I regret it as well.

Thanks Marty for highlighting it. 

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Dr. Karen Dietz's comment, August 22, 2014 2:07 PM
Right on Marty! I'm re-scooping this as a way to help that learning along about how to really use Scoop.it well and leverage it.
Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, August 22, 2014 2:25 PM

FYI Folks -- I trust that the reviews I write about the articles I curate help people along in their business storytelling journey. I know that there are many curators out there who do not add reviews/comments to the articles they highlight. 


As a result, Scoop.it and other curation sites are getting a backlash because audience members are tired of getting a link to an article that brings them to Scoop.it, and then requires another click to get to the article. Now I know that is annoying. And there is nothing of value offered between clicks.


Marty's response to the original blog post is right on. Read it along with all the other comments. Truly illuminating.


Other than a rant for me, what's the value of this post to you and business storytelling?


Namely this -- no matter what medium you use -- blogging, curating, digital storytelling -- make sure you are actually adding value for your audience. Expand their knowledge, give them tools, show them how, and offer your excellent insights. The stories you share have to connect to your audience in these ways. Anything else is a waste.


All of these posts and reviews add up to telling your story in a big picture way. So thanks Marty for addressing this issue, and reminding us about principles for quality curation. I've learned a lot from both you and Robin!


Karen Dietz

Bob Connelly's comment, November 23, 2014 7:11 PM
Being new to Scoop.it, I was glad to read this. I wouldn't have thought about this...