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What a Content Curator Needs To Know: How, Tools, Issues and Strategy
Curated by Robin Good
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You Can Be a Trusted Guide To The Most Relevant Information Online: Not Google

You Can Be a Trusted Guide To The Most Relevant Information Online: Not Google | Content Curation World | Scoop.it



Robin Good's insight:



Matt Rosoff writes on Business Insider UK:

"A lot of people think Google Search is like a map: An objective guide to the best and most important material on the internet. It's not.


Google Search is the most important product of a very wealthy and successful for-profit company. And Google will use this product to further its own commercial ends." (Not to help people find the most relevant info to their own learning needs.)


This is an excellent article that should be read a couple of times slowly to remind oneself of Google key aspirations and limits.


In it, the author illustrates with relevant references how Google uses whatever means it has to further the interest and revenues generated by its search engine ad business (AdWords / AdSense).

 

It also highlights, that like any other dominant, monopoly-like company it risks of being challenged in courts around the world, and this is "what Google desperately wants to avoid. If a government body issues a formal legal ruling that Google Search is an anticompetitive monopoly that needs to be regulated, it opens the floodgates".

Meanwhile Google Search is and will be increasingly challenged by smaller but more relevant, specialist search engines, like Amazon or Yelp.


But Google, hungry by its profit-driven goals, keeps also increasing the amount of information it provides itself inside search results, versus original content and resources that are out there on the web.


In four years time Google has doubled the amount screen real estate that it uses to promote its services or ads.


All of this to say, that Google is a for-profit company and not a humanitarian endeavour built and maintained to provide a true guide to the best information available online. 




For whoever has the interest, passion and skills to search, filter and organise information this is important news. 

There's an opportunity to provide higher quality, better vetted information results than Google presently does. At least in some areas. 

If Google is too busy about serving ads and pushing its own services, there will have to be someone else who can provide to Google, or other search engines, trusted quality search results on specific subject matters. 


As for Google there is one area where it cannot really compete with talented humans: trust. 


True information curators, of the expert kind, may indeed become in great demand in the near future. And personal trust will determine which one you and I will rely on. Whether Google will exist or not.



Right to the point. Informative. 9/10


Full article: http://uk.businessinsider.com/google-is-not-a-charity-2015-3 

Stephen Dale's curator insight, March 24, 2015 4:54 AM

Put simply - Google (and for that matter any commercial search engine) may skew search results to promote their own commercial interests. The question to ask yourself is "are the (search) results good enough?" - I'd say in Google's defence "yes they are".

 

Reading time: 5mins

WSI Digital Wave's curator insight, April 2, 2015 7:22 AM

https://plus.google.com/+PaulMathewsWSI/posts

Nedko Aldev's curator insight, April 5, 2015 12:21 PM

 

167
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The Future of Learning Is All About Curation and Search



Robin Good's insight:



If you are curious to know what I think about curation and search and their future, check out this 3-minute audio excerpt from a much longer interview about curating your experience I had with Joel Zasflosky of ValueofSimple.

In it I highlight how inadequate is to expect Google results to fulfill the need that many people have to learn and deepen their knowledge about a topic they are not familiar with.

Google set of very specific, highly filtered and ranked text results represent many, often relevant, individual bites of a larger puzzle that is never shown.

You are provided tons of individual trees in place of the "forest" you have asked about.

That is the greatest limitation for Google… when it comes the need, not to find a specific book, product, event or person, but for learning, understanding, for seeing the bigger picture, then the individual bites, ranked by Google authority or Pagerank, just don't serve our need.

This is why, just like we can't feed our appetites only with Big Macs, when it comes to learning about a topic we're not familiar with, we will increasingly rely on curated search engines, trusted guides and portals who can provide us with a much better and more useful roadmap into learning than Google can.


Audio excerpt: https://soundcloud.com/user458849/curation-and-search-joel


Full interview: http://valueofsimple.com/smart-and-simple-matters-podcast-023-with-robin-good/ 


MP3 full interview: http://traffic.libsyn.com/valueofsimple/023_SmartAndSimpleMattersPodcastFromValueOfSimple.mp3


Subscribe to iTunes podcast: http://valueofsimple.com/itunes







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In Selecting The Best News, Humans Beat Robots, at Last!

In Selecting The Best News, Humans Beat Robots, at Last! | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Lots of people might know about this, some do not, no matter what, it's still good to see it in print.  Human curation works and will play a significant role on the web.

 

Excerpt: After almost a decade, Google is somewhat sheepishly admitting that humans are, well, useful after all.

 

What Google is embracing -- finally -- is the emergence of human curation as a central and critical editorial effort in the increasingly noisy web. Curation, it seems, trumps robots when it comes to both interestingness and editorial tone and voice.

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/steve-rosenbaum/google-news-humans-beat-r_b_926641.html


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The Curated Google Search Result Page: The Mega-SERP

The Curated Google Search Result Page: The Mega-SERP | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



A good example of how you can provide a lot more insight to others by painstakingly curating a specific topic by collecting, organizing and juxtaposing effectively all of the relevant pieces.


Dr.Pete. also known as Peter J. Myers has curated an insightful visual montage that showcases all of Google search engine result page features in one page.


The result is a pretty amazing view, that, at least in my view, would be much more welcome than the existing results. Much more so, if it was me, the user searching, being able to decide which one of these features to turn on or off depending on my needs.


The time has come for me and you to decide how we want to slice, view and rank search results and this wonderful user-generated montage points to how much more could be seen if it was me or you to decide what to display inside your SERPs.



Inspiring. Instructional. Informative. 9/10


Original story: 

http://moz.com/blog/mega-serp-a-visual-guide-to-google 


Interactive illustrated image: http://www.thinglink.com/scene/444884388539269122

*hover your mouse on the different sections to see a descriptio of that feature





Halina Ostańkowicz-Bazan's curator insight, October 20, 2013 5:45 AM

Thank you for sharing.

Lila Hanft's curator insight, October 30, 2013 3:25 PM

This could be really useful for documenting successful SEO or for setting benchmarks.

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Google Lost Its Mojo: Content Curation is the New Search

Google Lost Its Mojo: Content Curation is the New Search | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Though I had seen and scooped this article before, I must have not done a very good job of really reading it from back to back. Paul Kedroski, who wrote this over a year and half ago, really captured the historical essence of content curation on the web.


This is an absolutely must-read article for anyone wanting to grasp what is happening with content curation on the web, hwile seeing things in proper perspective.


He wrote: "What has happened is that Google's ranking algorithm, like any trading algorithm, has lost its alpha.


It no longer has lists to draw and, on its own, it no longer generates the same outperformance -- in part because it is, for practical purposes, reverse-engineered, well-understood and operating in an adaptive content landscape.


Search results ...so polluted by spam that you often started looking at results only on the second or third page...


...


There are two things that can happen now.


a) We could get better algorithms, which is happening to some degree, with search engines like Blekko and others.


b) Or, we could head back to curation, which is what I see happening, and watch new algos emerge on top of that next-gen curation again.


Think of Twitter as a new stab at curation, but there are plenty of other examples.


Yes, that sounds mad. If we couldn't index 100,000 websites in 1996 by hand, how do we propose to do 234-million by hand today?


The answer, of course, is that we won't -- do them all by hand, that is. Instead, the re-rise of curation is partly about crowd curation -- not one people, but lots of people, whether consciously (lists, etc.) or unconsciously (tweets, etc) -- and partly about hand curation (JetSetter, etc.).


We are going to increasingly see nichey services that sell curation as a primary feature, with the primary advantage of being mostly unsullied by content farms, SEO spam, and nonsensical Q&A sites intended to create low-rent versions of Borges' Library of Babylon.


The result will be a subset of curated sites that will re-seed a new generation of algorithmic search sites, and the cycle will continue, over and over.


In short, curation is the new search. It's also the old search."


Must read. 9/10


Full article: http://www.businessinsider.com/googles-search-algorithm-is-spinning-out-of-control-2011-1



Robin Good's comment, July 11, 2012 1:10 AM
Thank you Ishak.
Stewart-Marshall's comment, July 11, 2012 11:40 AM
Excellent - a very prophetic analysis - wished I'd read it a year and half ago :-)
Beth Kanter's comment, July 11, 2012 12:34 PM
I only use google like a phone book -when I'm looking for a specific reference. But if I'm doing research on a topic, my strategy for years has been to go to the key sources (curators) and look through their libraries. I find the lack of context that search returns - makes me want to throw up. It is a much better experience to see it in context through the yes of someone who knows the content area.
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Curation platforms vs Search engines

Curation platforms vs Search engines | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

This is an interesting comparison  and I think it's a good start....... search and curation continue to evolve and there's lots more to this story, stay tuned...........

 

Intro:

 

Curation platforms vs Search engines Nowadays, search engines like Google are essential tools for every Internet work. But are they the best place to search anything? We believe that a manual...

 

Search engines present a list of content, ranked by a relative relevance between the results. Curation platforms like Bundlr present themed groups of content, usually ranked by popularity, but always highlighting the author of the selection.

 

Search engines work better when:

 

We’re looking for definite answers The source long term authority matters The quantity of results is important

 

Curation platforms work better when:

 

Events are recent or on-going (and traditional sources are slow to catch up) There are multiple points of view Concrete example are prefered to definitions

 

http://blog.gobundlr.com/post/8821314660/curation-platforms-vs-search-engines


Via janlgordon
Tom George's comment, August 12, 2011 12:56 PM
Wow Jan,
This is a great one. Notice I commented on this at the end of the post using Facebook. http://bit.ly/nX8ObV If you send me a facebook request, you can comment back anytime you like and also be notified if someone else happens to comment on your curation. I gotta do some training now back for more later Thiis is great. Did you know you can also share any other Scoop you like from another curator??