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Content Curation World
What a Content Curator Needs To Know: How, Tools, Issues and Strategy
Curated by Robin Good
Author: Robin Good   Google+
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Why I Don't Like Scoopit Links on Twitter

Why I Don't Like Scoopit Links on Twitter | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

I’m seeing more Scoopit links in my Twitter stream and I’m not crazy about it.  Sure it’s quick and easy to share with Scoopit.  But it not quick and easy to consume. For me it's all about the econ...

Marty Note (here is comment I wrote on Dr. V's blog)

Appreciate Bryan’s and Joseph’s comment, but I rarely use Scoop.it as a pass through. More than 90% of the time I’m adding “rich snippets” to content I Scoop.

Rich snippets are “blog” posts that fall between Twitter and the 500 to 1,000 words I would write in Scenttrail Marketing. I often create original content ON Scoop.it because whatever I’m writing falls in the crack between Twitter’s micro blog and what I think of as needing to be on my marketing blog.


I was taught NOT to pass through links on Scoop.it early on by the great curator @Robin Good . Robin has well over 1M views on Scoop.it now and his advice along with the patient advice of other great Scoop.it curators has my profile slouching toward 150,000 views.


Bryan is correct that some curators new to Scoop.it haven’t learned the Robin Good lesson yet. I agree it is frustrating to go to a link and not receive anything of value back, to simply need to click on another link. Curators who pass through links won’t scale, so the Darwinian impact will be they will learn to add value or die out.


For my part I always identify my Scoop.it links, probably about half the content I Tweet and about a quarter of my G+ shares. I also routinely share my favorite “Scoopiteers”, great content curators who taught me valuable lessons such as don’t simply pass through links but add “micro blogging” value via rich snippets.


When you follow or consistently share content from a great curator on Scooop.it you begin to understand HOW they shape the subjects they curate. I know, for example, Robin Good is amazing on new tools. Scoop.it anticipated this learning and built in a feature where I can suggest something to Robin.


This is when Scoop.it is at its most crowdsourcing best because I now have an army of curators who know I like to comment on and share content about design or BI or startups and they (other Scoopiteers) keep an eye out for me. There are several reasons Scoop.it is a “get more with less effort” tool and this crowdsourcing my curation is high on the list.


So, sorry you are sad to see Scoop.it links and understand your frustration. You’ve correctly identified the problem too – some curators don’t know how to use the tool yet. I know it is a lot to ask to wait for the Darwinian learning that will take place over generations, but Scoop.it and the web have “generations” that have the half life of a gnat so trust that the richness of the Scoop.it community will win in the end and “the end” won’t take long.


To my fellow Scoop.it curators we owe Bryan and Joseph thanks for reminding us of what Robin Good taught me – add value or your Scoop.it won’t scale. That lessons is applicable to much more than how we use Scoop.it.


Marty

Added to G+ too
https://plus.google.com/102639884404823294558/posts/TUsNtsAsjWp

 


Via Martin (Marty) Smith
Robin Good's insight:

Well, I can't really agree more with Marty's point.

On the other hand Scoop.it, and a number of similar platforms,  are heavily promoted as a content marketing platforms that promise to a) save you time and b) allow you to post more content.

And then, unless you heavily moderate and surface editorial models that can guide other users, you tend to level down to the lowest common denominator. 

This is what I see happening and I regret it as well.

Thanks Marty for highlighting it. 

more...
Peg Corwin's comment, March 10, 6:54 PM
Further to Therese Torris' comment, might we ask Scoop.it for a setting that allows us to choose to automatically tweet the post author when we re-scoop? It takes many clicks back and forth to get and add it.
Martin (Marty) Smith's comment, March 10, 7:06 PM
Yes @Peg Corwin I see your "filtering" much like @Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com work as providing value. As Brian shared he discard much more content than he is sharing. I think this builds on Robin's idea of "value" and its meaningful, fast and valuable to those who understand that filtering is the primary activity. I don't think its hard to know this since the second time a customer follows a link of yours or Brian's they know they are following your curation suggestion. On Sunday I thought "pass through" was an unsustainable model. After a day of #startup school I am not so sure. You and Brian are building a themed castle one brick (one share) at a time as surely as I am or anyone else using Scoop.it. Today it feels like a defined link share as you and Brian have described is a valuable service. <br><br>You've hit the primary value AND I often cut the middle man out (something it isn't hard to do ust use Google to search the title). Bryan (Dr V) was complaining about the extra click and that is why I sometimes jump past the pass through too, but since that jump isn't difficult and the oeuvre you create has merit as a whole I think we are simply approach the same problem with a slightly different approach (pass through vs. value add). I think you and Brian are SAVING TIME since you evaluate mor content than you share. <br><br>Despite Dr. V's complaint about seeing Scoop.it links I think that is an important signal and a signals that connects the IDEA of your curation as a whole, so I would say when you drive to Scoop.it using a Scoop.it moniker is a good idea. M
Peg Corwin's comment, March 11, 9:19 AM
Thanks Marty. I think indexing a topic like this adds value in a different way to the curation. http://website.pegcorwin.com/p/4010710384/2013/11/09/popular-topics
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The Demise of Quality Content on the Web - The Rise of Great Content Curators

The Demise of Quality Content on the Web - The Rise of Great Content Curators | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

This a great blog post from Rian van der Merwe , describing the noise you can find on the web now, and especially content just created for SEO purposes or advertisers. As many, Rian is tired of it.

 

Rian speaks for many of us who are overwhelmed, overloaded with content that gives us no value at all. This is the problem

 

"I used to believe that if you write with passion and clarity about a topic you know well (or want to know more about), you will find and build an audience. I believed that maybe, if you’re smart about it, you could find a way for some part of that audience to pay you money to sustain whatever obsession drove you to self-publishing"'

 

Here's what caught my attention:

 

****The wells of attention are being drilled to depletion by linkbait headlines, ad-infested pages, “jumps” and random pagination, and content that is engineered to be “consumed” in 1 minute or less of quick scanning – just enough time to capture those almighty eyeballs[2]. And the reality is that “Alternative Attention sources” simply don’t exist.

 

The Scoopit team agrees!

 

My input:

 

****The Opportunity: This is the time for all good curators to come forward - 2012 will be the year of the content curator -

 

**Know your audience

**Know their pain points

**Find and select the best content, add your own opinions, information or anything that will provide more value for your audience

**Select only the best content, don't just aggregate links that add to the noise

**Become a trusted resource - many opportunities will come to you, it's your time to shine

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/tF0opI]

 


Via axelletess, janlgordon
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Karen Dietz's comment, December 4, 2011 12:23 PM
Great post and comments Jan! Looking forward to 2012.
janlgordon's comment, December 4, 2011 2:59 PM
@Karen Dietz

Thanks Karen! 2012 is going to be an amazing year for all of us!!
Gust MEES's curator insight, February 14, 2013 7:39 AM

Quality Matters!

A MUST read!!!

Check also:

http://www.scoop.it/webwizard

http://www.scoop.it/t/the-scoop-it-spotlight

http://blog.scoop.it/en/2011/11/30/lord-of-curation-series-gust-mees/

 

Rescooped by Robin Good from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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Content Discovery Engines: Six Key Traits That Make Them Effective

Content Discovery Engines: Six Key Traits That Make Them Effective | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

This post is from Darwin Ecosystem

 

Excerpt:

 

With the increasing need for relevant content, Discovery engines are becoming tools that save time and encourage effective information consumption.

 

Content discovery engines are similar to, but different from search engines.

 

Instead of simply providing results for a specific search query, discovery engines allow users to monitor topic-specific developments.

 

There are many types of discovery engines, and the technology that drives them and the way they present information differs greatly.

 

Why Are Content Discovery Engines Gaining Importance?

 

**more people recognize their potential to transform information consumption.

 

6 Traits of Highly Effective Content Discovery Engines

 

*Monitor Unique Topics of Interest

*In Real-Time

*Independent from sources

*Human-Centered

*Eliminate the noise

*Display Emerging Patterns

 

There is an increasing need for relevant content to benefit users of the web.

 

As content repository increases in size, discovery engines will be a primary means of finding new information.

 

****In order for content discovery engines to succeed, they will need to find the right balance between:

 

Read more:

 

http://bit.ly/v3Dy7S

 


Via janlgordon
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Rescooped by Robin Good from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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From Content Curation to People Curation

From Content Curation to People Curation | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

This post was written by Tony Karrer from Aggregage

 

He has some interesting things to say about an article he read by Ville Kilkku, which was all about the future of content curation, the title of the piece he's referring to in this post is "Klout, Triberr, paper.li, and the future of content curation".

 

Intro

 

He says,


"Reading this article made me realize that people curation should be a lot of what we are really talking about here. But before I get to that, let me step through what he talks about. He takes us through a few different models of content curation. I’m going to need to compare these to my post on Marketing via Aggregation, Filtering and Curation – Tools and Resources to see if this classification changes things."

 

He then talks about three major trends in content curation:

 

From individual content curators to crowdsourced content curation: Individuals cannot keep up with the pace of new content, even though they have better discovery tools than before. Crowdsourcing can, although it is not suitable for promoting radical new ideas: the dictatorship of the masses is unavoidably conservative.

 

From manual to semi-automated content curation: Individual content curators are forced to automate as much of the process as possible in order to stay relevant. From content curation to people curation: When there is too much content, you vet the content creators, manually or automatically. Those who pass get exposure for all of their content.

 

What caught my attention:

 

How do these trends interact? Social networking of the content creator is vitally important in order to create an audience as isolated content becomes increasingly difficult to discover and curation focuses on people instead of individual content. Build it, and they will come, is dead.

 

http://www.aggregage.com/blog/curation/people-curation


Via janlgordon
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Robin Good's comment, September 8, 2011 3:50 AM
Thank you Jani, as always good stuff.

I would like also to kindly ask you, if you feel so, to share your comment and advice to this post, which relates strongly to our curation work and to how the Scoop.it management handles our requests, feedback and us:
http://www.scoop.it/t/real-time-news-curation/p/435456801/should-scoop-it-and-other-curation-tools-credit-original-sources-it-seems-not-missing-source-element-and-link-inside-rss-feed

Many thanks in advance!
Karen Dietz's comment, September 10, 2011 12:36 PM
Great article -- thanks!
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Curation vs. Blogging: The Difference Is In The Focus

Curation vs. Blogging: The Difference Is In The Focus | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Robin Good: If curation is all about finding and sharing great content, what's the difference with what so many bloggers have been doing until now?

The difference, according to Deanna Dahlsad at Kitsch-Slapped, is in the focus. While bloggers often cover just about anything that intercepts their online wanderings, curators are characterized by a strong focus on a specific topic.  


Here is a key passage from her article: "Many bloggers spend their time selecting what they consider the best of what other people have created on the web and post it at their own sites, just like a magazine or newspaper.


Or they provide a mix of this along with writing or otherwise creating their own content. Not to split hairs, but curation involves less creation and more searching and sifting; curation’s more a matter of focused filtering than it is writing.


Because content curation is expected to be based on such focused filtering, it begins far more based on topic selection.


This is much different from blogging, where bloggers are often advised to “just begin” and let their voice and interests accumulate over time to eventually reveal a primary theme.


...


Some collectors just collect what they like as they stumble into it. …Sometimes, collectors just keep piling up stuff, no matter what it is. Even if this isn’t hoarding, it’s not-so-much of a purposeful pursuit.


But professional curators, those who manage collections for museums or other organizations, and serious collectors, they maintain a specific focus.


And rather than stumbling into items, they continually seek for specific items.


The definition dictates the curation — and everything from funding to their continued employment is based on how well their collection meets the collection’s definition.


While blogging success may be thought of in many different ways, the success of content curation lies in how well you define, search/research, and stick to your subject."


Rightful. 8/10


Full article: http://www.kitsch-slapped.com/2012/06/facts-questions-on-blogging-curating-collecting/ 

more...
Robin Good's comment, June 19, 2012 4:21 PM
Thank you Deanna for writing it!
AnneMarie Cunningham's curator insight, March 14, 2013 2:13 PM

another explanation of curation

Everett Hudson's comment, March 22, 2013 10:50 AM
you have great ideas. more please!
Rescooped by Robin Good from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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How to Use “Curation” to Boost Content “Creation”

How to Use “Curation” to Boost Content “Creation” | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

This piece was written by Heba Hosny, a guest blogger for Lauralee Walker

 

This article is full of wonderful tips for taking your curation to the next level and embellish your original content.

 

"Content curation rewards are not limited to branding and SEO; it can also enhance the visibility and the quality of your own content."

 

There are many things that caught my attention, here are just a few gems:

 

Curated Content Can Inspire Topics For Created Content

 

If you don't master this one, all the other tips won't make any sense

 

****Understand which topics are irresistible to your target audience

 

My Commentary:

 

I love this one!

 

Here's the tip

 

****Instead of taking the easy route of sharing the topic with your audience, write a blog post to "build on" it.

 

You can build on a topic in different ways:

 

**Beg to differ politely

 

**Provide additional tips and insights

 

**Ask clarifying question(s)

 

My Commentary:

 

This is a great way to add "context" it can start conversations, which invites others to add their comments, bring new observations and more information about a particular topic.

 

**A perfect segue to building relationships, community, doing business and increasing knowledge.

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/sJs2I8]


Via janlgordon
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janlgordon's comment, November 22, 2011 3:21 PM
Hi Beth,
I agree with you, I love the feeling of community and the collective wisdom, and you know "curation resonates with me":-)
janlgordon's comment, November 22, 2011 3:22 PM
Thanks so much for rescooping and sharing on twitter:-)
Pittsburgh Tote Bag Project's comment, November 25, 2011 9:17 PM
This has me thinking critically about how we are integrating social media. Inviting interaction has been a huge challenge. We are stimulating new conversations in real world time, but that's not reflected in comments and so forth. I like using Scoop.It widgets to get the newest scoop onto the bog in a timely manner and take some time to reflect on post content.
Rescooped by Robin Good from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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How To Effectively Combine Curation With Your Content Strategy

How To Effectively Combine Curation With Your Content Strategy | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Margot Bloomstein, a content strategist talks about how to combine curation to your content strategy by showcasing lessons she has adopted from museum curators and so much more.

 

What caught my attention:

 

**She talks about copywriting issues. Because a curator goes way beyond aggregating which is just gathering content, they arrange it in order of relevance, point out what you should pay attention to and many other important things.  It takes a lot of thought to assemble pieces in a cohesive manner, add context to it, ad take it to the next level. 

 

**It is appropiate to give the curator credit if you're going to repost or use it in any manner.

 

http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2011/09/15/margot-bloomstein-combining-curation-with-your-content-strategy/

 

 


Via janlgordon
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Tom George's comment, March 20, 2012 9:19 AM
Hey Pedro,
I am the founder of Internet Billboards, my name is Tom George. Do you think you will be curated more on this topic and building a nice Scoop.it page? The reason I ask is I can show you how you can auto share your Scoop.it selections to Internet Billboards.
Rescooped by Robin Good from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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In Selecting The Best News, Humans Beat Robots, at Last!

In Selecting The Best News, Humans Beat Robots, at Last! | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Lots of people might know about this, some do not, no matter what, it's still good to see it in print.  Human curation works and will play a significant role on the web.

 

Excerpt: After almost a decade, Google is somewhat sheepishly admitting that humans are, well, useful after all.

 

What Google is embracing -- finally -- is the emergence of human curation as a central and critical editorial effort in the increasingly noisy web. Curation, it seems, trumps robots when it comes to both interestingness and editorial tone and voice.

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/steve-rosenbaum/google-news-humans-beat-r_b_926641.html


Via janlgordon
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