Content Curation World
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Content Curation World
What a Content Curator Needs To Know: How, Tools, Issues and Strategy
Curated by Robin Good
Author: Robin Good   Google+
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13 Real-World Examples of How Content Curation Can Be Monetized

Real-world examples showing how gathering, collecting, organising and adding value to existing available information can create useful and economically sustain…
Robin Good's insight:



If it is true that *attention* is the one of the highest valued intangible assets, whoever is capable to provide a solution that saves people time (and frustration, effort, comparing, verifying, etc.) in getting what they want / need, will likely get lots of it. 


For example, if I could save you all of the time that you would need to:
 

- find all the journalists that could cover your startup and their email


- get the full story on what is happening in a specific market secto


- choose the ideal set of free online courses to achieve a skillset


- find easily the old, downloadable version of your favorite software


- know which are all of the events devoted to "x" that are coming up


wouldn't you be willing to pay for it?


For some of these, I probably would.


In this slide deck from the "Art of Content Curation" event that took place this past January in Amsterdam, you can find 13 examples of websites, blogs, startups and web companies that have a created a sustainable, if not altogether profitable business, by collecting, filtering, organising, adding value and presenting in uniquely effective ways, existing information, already available online. 

If you are wondering whether it is actually possible to create an online business around the art of content curation, here are some tangible, real-world examples, that you can look at.


For each one you will find a number of screenshots and a synthetic info card summarising the service that they offer and their business model.


First shown on January 15th 2015 at the "Art of Content Curation" event in Amsterdam.  

Original slide deck: http://www.slideshare.net/RobinGood/the-business-of-content-curation-48467720 

 



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Thorsten Strauss's curator insight, October 25, 2015 3:41 PM

Best practice: curation and business model thinking. Great presentation on monetization.

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Curation as a Business Model in Abundance and Commodity Markets

Curation as a Business Model in Abundance and Commodity Markets | Content Curation World | Scoop.it



Robin Good's insight:



Mitch Free writes on Forbes about the unique business value that curation can bring to those markets where there is already an abundance of choices.


"The web has revolutionized access to information. If you travel to a new city, you don’t have to wait to ask a hotel concierge or local contact which restaurants are worth your time: that information is at your fingertips long before you arrive.


The web’s universality and ubiquity are also its weaknesses, however: even if all are listed online, choosing from the 25,000 restaurants in New York City still requires a local’s advice.


While “curation” might bring to mind the image of a red-jacketed museum staffer scowling at you for taking flash photographs, in the digital age it’s becoming an increasingly critical – and lucrative – business model.


No longer is access to information precious in itself. Information is overwhelmingly available, and those in a position to tame the tidal wave into a useful format offer a valuable service."


The articles uses as a reference example the case of a new restaurant listing site that curates the best 100 restaurants in 100 cities by charging qualifying restaurants.



Rightful. Interesting. 7/10


Full article: http://www.forbes.com/sites/mitchfree/2013/08/05/curation-by-connection-one-hundred-tables/


(Image credit: Music cafe menu card by Shutterstock)




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Prof. Hankell's curator insight, August 7, 2013 10:19 AM
Robin Good's insight:

 

 

Mitch Free writes on Forbes about the unique business value that curation can bring to those markets where there is already an abundance of choices.

 

"The web has revolutionized access to information. If you travel to a new city, you don’t have to wait to ask a hotel concierge or local contact which restaurants are worth your time: that information is at your fingertips long before you arrive.


The web’s universality and ubiquity are also its weaknesses, however: even if all are listed online, choosing from the 25,000 restaurants in New York City still requires a local’s advice.


While “curation” might bring to mind the image of a red-jacketed museum staffer scowling at you for taking flash photographs, in the digital age it’s becoming an increasingly critical – and lucrative – business model.


No longer is access to information precious in itself. Information is overwhelmingly available, and those in a position to tame the tidal wave into a useful format offer a valuable service."

 

The articles uses as a reference example the case of a new restaurant listing site that curates the best 100 restaurants in 100 cities by charging qualifying restaurants.

 

 

Rightful. Interesting. 7/10

 

Full article:http://www.forbes.com/sites/mitchfree/2013/08/05/curation-by-connection-one-hundred-tables/

 
Ken Dickens's curator insight, August 7, 2013 1:00 PM

Non-Profits are a commodity. There are over 1.5 million of them in the US alone, all with great causes, all with their hands out to ask for money. Enter Donor Fatigue.  Want to stand out? Become "the" source of information on your cause. In other words, give to get.  You will stand out. You will gain trust.  And, you will raise money. 

Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, October 27, 2013 7:11 PM

This is a great read and what I'm betting on heavily at our crowdfunding cancer research website and nonprofit http://www.curecancerstarter.org. I love this quote:

?No longer do we rely on a few experts and advertisers to dole out information according to their own priorities, and passively consume that information. On the contrary, content can be created and curated by literally thousands of ‘average’ people with above average interest and insight, and spread across huge aggregations of likeminded people."

Frames my belief and our bet well.