Content Curation ...
Follow
Find tag "curator"
614.5K views | +16 today
Content Curation World
What a Content Curator Needs To Know: How, Tools, Issues and Strategy
Curated by Robin Good
Author: Robin Good   Google+
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Robin Good
Scoop.it!

The Value of Curation Expressed in a Beautiful Poem: The Curator

The Value of Curation Expressed in a Beautiful Poem: The Curator | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

"We thought it would come, we thought the Germans would come, were almost certain they would. I was thirty-two, / the youngest assistant curator in the country. I had some good ideas in those days."

Robin Good's insight:



The Curator, by Miller Williams, is a poem that illustrates the keen value of the curator. 

It's a short story, that can be read in just 3 minutes, and which can provide a great metaphor to explain to others, emotionally, what the value of the curator, is all about. 



Beautiful. Inspiring. 9/10


Read it now: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/176491 


Reading time: 3' mins.




Thanks to Nancy White for helping me discover it.

Check her super-interesting article entitled "Students Curators: Powerful Learningand her D20 Innovation blog.  



Image credit: Vintage frame by Shutterstock


more...
Nancy White's comment, March 12, 8:32 AM
Thank you Robin - I am glad you liked it. Our students were really able to understand the concept of curating through this poem.
aiguarentacar's comment, April 4, 1:13 PM
rescooped this on http://www.scoop.it/u/aiguarentacar
Scooped by Robin Good
Scoop.it!

Maria Popova and The Art of Curation: An Interview with the Curiosity Guide

Maria Popova and The Art of Curation: An Interview with the Curiosity Guide | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

"...I consume a lot of information across an incredibly wide spectrum of disciplines and sources, always aiming to synthesize the meaningful and connect it with something else for a larger portrait of what matters in the world."

Robin Good's insight:



Maria Popova is the editor of Brain PIckings, a unique blog site cum newsletter that curates stories and articles from the web that stimulate the mind of the curious and which provide insight into the type of culture we live in.


In an excellent 2010 interview written by Chris Allison, Maria explains what she defines as curation and how she goes about it in her every day work.

In her definition: "Brain Pickings is a highly curatorial endeavor. And the art of curation isn’t about the individual pieces of content, but about how these pieces fit together, what story they tell by being placed next to each other, and what statement the context they create makes about culture and the world at large.


Every piece of content on Brain Pickings is hand-picked for embodying the sort of cultural interestingness at the core of our curatorial vision – it’s creative, compelling and makes a meaningful contribution to the world; it offers a justification to be curious and enriches you in the process of indulging that curiosity."


Maria also provides great examples of curation at work, and explains how all of the advertising on her site is "pro bono" and fitting her objective of curating in full the reader experience. In other words, Maria curates which ads are showcased on her site by selecting those reflecting companies and products she actually believes in for free. 


She also provides a valuable, and much valid to this day, vision for the future of curation and curators. Niche specialization, is in this case, the name of the game.



Very interesting. Insightful. Resourceful. 8/10


Full interview: http://www.neboagency.com/blog/art-curation-interview-maria-popova 


Check also the Flipboard interview with Maria Popova here: http://inside.flipboard.com/2010/12/31/flipboard-favorite-2010-interview-with-maria-popova/ 





more...
Ruby Day's curator insight, October 5, 2013 12:46 PM

Savy media consumption and in this case very savy production. Very innovative and inspiring women.

gregmhagar's curator insight, October 7, 2013 6:29 AM

More on the "art of curation".  Now, all we have to do is apply that wisdom to (formalized) learning and education.

Brian Kirby's curator insight, October 11, 2013 1:41 PM

How to sift through large amounts of information...

Scooped by Robin Good
Scoop.it!

The Collage Tells The Story and The Curator Skillset That's Yet To Come

The Collage Tells The Story and The Curator Skillset That's Yet To Come | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Robin GoodKrishna Bharat, creator of Google News and now Principle Scientist at Google, spoke at the News World Summit in Bangalore, India.


His focus was on the future of news and on the impotance of curation as well as on what the news will look and "feel" like.


He rightly suggests to news teams to "provide guides to content", not just new content and to deliver information in ways that entice the reader in multiple ways, while providing lots of good and well referenced information. 


Excerpted from the original Poynter.org article: "As consumers have access to vast troves of news information from all over the world, Bharat urged news editorial teams to provide a guide to content, not just produce content.


“Creation and curation should be the fundamental activities for your editorial team,” he said.


Bharat said news in the future will become more of an app-like experience, as users adapt the experience to themselves, and as newsrooms provide a more multi-dimensional experience that includes more images and maps.


The collage tells the story.


This will create a skill set that doesn’t exist yet.


And also:


"The winning experience of the future is fast, tactile, original content, with access to many reputable sources in an appealing narrative form,” Bharat said.


“It is delivered in an appealing, narrative form, encompasses a broader definition of news, and involves audiences with a stake in the story or with expertise."


Must-read. 9/10


Full article: http://www.poynter.org/latest-news/top-stories/175859/krishna-bharat-news-industry-futuremust-hire-restless-agents-of-change/ 

(Image credit: http://www.niceamazingpictures.com) 

more...
David Salahi's comment, June 2, 2012 9:12 AM
Brain Pickings (http://www.brainpickings.org/) is a site that exemplifies these principles.
Beth Kanter's comment, June 2, 2012 9:42 AM
Thanks for curating this article. I'm also noticing the rise of data visualization as a skill for journalists (and others) - might add that creation, curation, AND visualization should be the fundamental activities .... and when I say visualization - not just pretty pictures, but insights. http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/2012/may/31/data-journalism-awards-winners
janlgordon's comment, June 2, 2012 10:53 AM
Thank you for this amazing piece and for your great insights!
Rescooped by Robin Good from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Re-envisioning Modern Pedagogy: Educators as Curators

Robin Good: A great presentation by Corinne Weisberger and Shannan Butler on the emerging role of educators as curators and about the steps involved in creating valuable curated learning pathways.

Curator: Someone who plans and oversees the arrangement, cataloguing, and exhibition of collections. S/he describes and analyzes valuable objects for the benefit of researchers and the public.


Via Paulo Simões, Gust MEES
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Robin Good
Scoop.it!

Curators Key Requirement: Critical Thinking

Robin Good: Critical thinking is a key strategic skill needed by any serious professional curator. 


"Critical thinking provides the keys for our own intellectual independence..." and it helps to move away from "rashy conclusions, mystification and reluctance to question received wisdom, authority and tradition" while learning how to adopt "intellectual discipline" and a way to express clearly ideas while taking personal responsibility for them.


Key takeaways from this video:


  • Critical thinking refers to a diverse range of intellectual skills and activities concerned with "evaluating information" as well as our own thought in a disciplined way.
     
  • Critical thinking is not just thinking a lot. To be an effective critical thinker you need to seek out and be guided by "knowledge" and "evidence" that fits with reality even if it refutes what the general consensus may want to believe.
     
  • Critical thinkers cultivate an attitude of curiosity and they are willing to do the work required to keep themselves informed about a subject.
     
  • Critical thinkers do not take claims at face value but utilize scepticism and doubt to suspend judgement and objectively evaluate with facts the claims being made.
     
  • Critical thinkers should evaluate information on the basis of reasoning and not by relying on emotions as claims the factuality of a claim cannot be solely based on the level of emotion that accompanies them or the fact that they may be believed by certain groups.


Highly recommended for all curators. 9/10

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6OLPL5p0fMg 


more...
Beth Kanter's comment, February 21, 2012 8:56 PM
Thank you for sharing this video and the importance of critical thinking. It is so easy to get into the mindless consumption trap and making ourselves slow down, read, think, question, and seek is so important. It is all about the resisting the urge to click, but to hit the pause button and make yourself think
Mayra Aixa Villar's comment, February 22, 2012 7:14 AM
Grazie come sempre, Robin! You always share valuable information and this video is a great source to reflect on the importance of critical thinking to refine thought processes when curating content. Content curation certainly requires and develops "better thinking".
Gregory Thackston's curator insight, March 17, 2013 1:54 PM

Critical thinking is a key component in addressing autonomous adversity and the need to collaborate in decision making.

Rescooped by Robin Good from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Scoop.it!

The Demise of Quality Content on the Web - The Rise of Great Content Curators

The Demise of Quality Content on the Web - The Rise of Great Content Curators | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

This a great blog post from Rian van der Merwe , describing the noise you can find on the web now, and especially content just created for SEO purposes or advertisers. As many, Rian is tired of it.

 

Rian speaks for many of us who are overwhelmed, overloaded with content that gives us no value at all. This is the problem

 

"I used to believe that if you write with passion and clarity about a topic you know well (or want to know more about), you will find and build an audience. I believed that maybe, if you’re smart about it, you could find a way for some part of that audience to pay you money to sustain whatever obsession drove you to self-publishing"'

 

Here's what caught my attention:

 

****The wells of attention are being drilled to depletion by linkbait headlines, ad-infested pages, “jumps” and random pagination, and content that is engineered to be “consumed” in 1 minute or less of quick scanning – just enough time to capture those almighty eyeballs[2]. And the reality is that “Alternative Attention sources” simply don’t exist.

 

The Scoopit team agrees!

 

My input:

 

****The Opportunity: This is the time for all good curators to come forward - 2012 will be the year of the content curator -

 

**Know your audience

**Know their pain points

**Find and select the best content, add your own opinions, information or anything that will provide more value for your audience

**Select only the best content, don't just aggregate links that add to the noise

**Become a trusted resource - many opportunities will come to you, it's your time to shine

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/tF0opI]

 


Via axelletess, janlgordon
more...
Karen Dietz's comment, December 4, 2011 9:23 AM
Great post and comments Jan! Looking forward to 2012.
janlgordon's comment, December 4, 2011 11:59 AM
@Karen Dietz

Thanks Karen! 2012 is going to be an amazing year for all of us!!
Gust MEES's curator insight, February 14, 2013 4:39 AM

Quality Matters!

A MUST read!!!

Check also:

http://www.scoop.it/webwizard

http://www.scoop.it/t/the-scoop-it-spotlight

http://blog.scoop.it/en/2011/11/30/lord-of-curation-series-gust-mees/

 

Rescooped by Robin Good from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Scoop.it!

Content Curators Playing A Larger Role Online

Content Curators Playing A Larger Role Online | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Curated story by janlgordon.

 

Tony reminds us that content curators play a role in information overload - they take time to sort, select, comment on good content that helps keeps you current on your topic of interest.

 

Tony says:

 

"With the ever increasing amount of online information from social networks, the need for organizing it has never been greater. Look around and there’s no shortage of aggregation tools to help us filter out the important stuff."

 

Here's what caught my attention:

 

**In this world of information overload, there’s now a new layer in the media ecosystem: the curator. If it wasn’t for that person who retweeted the story in the first place, you probably wouldn’t have seen it.

 

**So naming the retweeters in daily promos is the right course of action. Twitter is like a fire hose and Paper.li is selecting random tweets that would have otherwise been missed.

 

**Yes, they’re randomly chosen but I find a lot of value in them because they praise others for their contributions.

 

**It reminds me that they’re part of my network and I can appreciate their contributions that much more. I know when I’m named in someone’s newspaper it motivates me to continue sharing that type of content.

 


Via janlgordon
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Robin Good
Scoop.it!

Creating a Framework for What Matters and Why: Maria Popova Explains What It Means To Be a Curator

Creating a Framework for What Matters and Why: Maria Popova Explains What It Means To Be a Curator | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:


Back in Feberuary of this year Debbie Millman has interviewed Maria Popova, the curator of Brain PickingsLiterary Jukebox and the inventor of Curator's Code.


Find out what Maria thinks curation is all about (How do we make sense of the world we through stuff and through objects - whether physical or metaphysical) and why she has become so interested in it.


Maria is a fantastic and highly prolific content curator producing three original posts and between 60 to 70 tweets a day.


Specific interview points I suggest you listen to: 


-> 24':30" for combinatorial creativity and the first recorded examples of content curation as a form authroship


-> 27':16" Curation - Do you define yourself a curator?


-> 28':00" Curators don't design, they organize


-> 28':50" What is curation


-> 29':19" Curation and pattern recognition


-> 37':45" The importance of discovery - why attribution matters



Source: http://chipkidd.com/journal/?p=4566 


Original audio interview: https://soundcloud.com/designmatters/maria-popova 

(duration: 52':07")


.MP3 audio download: https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/75217989/download?client_id=0f8fdbbaa21a9bd18210986a7dc2d72c 


More interesting interviews: Design Matters Podcast






more...
Therese Torris's curator insight, December 12, 2013 3:39 AM

Interesting interview about an interesting personnality

John Thomas's curator insight, February 5, 2:15 AM

Creating a Framework for What Matters and Why: Maria Popova Explains What It Means To Be a Curator

Scooped by Robin Good
Scoop.it!

Curation Levels: Learner, Facilitator, Designer - Where Do You Stand?

Curation Levels: Learner, Facilitator, Designer - Where Do You Stand? | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



Kirsten Wilson analyzes three different levels of content curation presently in use and describes accurately the differences between these. 


"In regards to levels of curation it is much like Blooms. There is knowledge level curation- it is done for remembering and understanding (the “Learner Level”).


Another level is applying and analyzing- it is curated for use or been used and is a proven tool for using whether it be your tool or a tool you have discovered from your global connections via Social Media, blogs or simple internet searches (the “Facilitator Level”). 


Finally, there are curations that go to the level of evaluation and creation… these are the curations that become invaluable tools to others. It takes the most work, but the result is most thorough and the resource it provides to others can be invaluable (the “Designer Level”)."


He concludes by reminding all would-be curators the importance of attribution and the amount of effort that the "designer level" of curation requires: "In this world of immediate access and available content make every effort to honor the source of your curation, inspiration and/or springboard for design. 


Those that do curate at a “Designer” level and in many cases are the first in their field of expertise to find a new “method” put hours into the development and design."



Rightful. Instructional. 7/10


Full original article: http://teachkiwi.wordpress.com/2013/08/31/content-collaboration-and-curation-part-2/ 



(Image credit: Three trophies by Shutterstock)




more...
Linda Dougherty's curator insight, September 8, 2013 4:58 PM

Awesome explanation for curation.  Thanks Kirsten Wilson @teachkiwi for this wonderful insight into why we curate!

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, September 22, 2013 3:36 PM

Robin Good opinion:

Kirsten Wilson analyzes three different levels of content curation presently in use and describes accurately the differences between these. 

 

"In regards to levels of curation it is much like Blooms. There is knowledge level curation- it is done for remembering and understanding (the “Learner Level”).


Another level is applying and analyzing- it is curated for use or been used and is a proven tool for using whether it be your tool or a tool you have discovered from your global connections via Social Media, blogs or simple internet searches (the “Facilitator Level”). 


Finally, there are curations that go to the level of evaluation and creation… these are the curations that become invaluable tools to others. It takes the most work, but the result is most thorough and the resource it provides to others can be invaluable (the “Designer Level”)."

 

He concludes by reminding all would-be curators the importance of attribution and the amount of effort that the "designer level" of curation requires: "In this world of immediate access and available content make every effort to honor the source of your curation, inspiration and/or springboard for design. 


Those that do curate at a “Designer” level and in many cases are the first in their field of expertise to find a new “method” put hours into the development and design."

 

 

Rightful. Instructional. 7/10

 

Full original article: http://teachkiwi.wordpress.com/2013/08/31/content-collaboration-and-curation-part-2/ ;

 

 

(Image credit: Three trophies by Shutterstock)

Zhang Meilan's curator insight, October 7, 2013 10:16 AM

Robin Good把内容策展分为三个层次:策展的学习者,策展的设计者,策展的促进者。

 

 

Scooped by Robin Good
Scoop.it!

Credit and Attribution Are Fantastic Untapped Resources for Discovery, Not Duties: Maria Popova and The Curator's Code

Credit and Attribution Are Fantastic Untapped Resources for Discovery, Not Duties: Maria Popova and The Curator's Code | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Maria Popova has just launched a classy and laudable initiative, focused on increasing awareness and in highlighting the importance of honoring always where or via who you have got to a certain article, report, video or image.


Credit and attribution are not just a "formal" way to comply with rules, laws and authors but an incredibly powerful emebddable mechanism to augment findability, discovery, sinergy and collaboration among human being interested in the same topic.


She writes: "In an age of information overload, information discovery — the service of bringing to the public’s attention that which is interesting, meaningful, important, and otherwise worthy of our time and thought — is a form of creative and intellectual labor, and one of increasing importance and urgency.


A form of authorship, if you will.


Yet we don’t have a standardized system for honoring discovery the way we honor other forms of authorship and other modalities of creative and intellectual investment, from literary citations to Creative Commons image rights."


For this purpose Curator's Code was created.


Curator's Code is first of all "a movement to honor and standardize attribution of discovery across the web" as well as a web site where you can learn about the two key types of attribution that we should be using:

a) Via - which indicates a link of direct discovery

b) Hat tip - Indicates a link of indirect discovery, story lead, or inspiration.


Each one has now a peculiar characterizing icon that Curator's Code suggests to integrate in your news and content publication policies. 


Additionally and to make it easy for anyone to integrate these new attribution icons in their work, Curator's Code has created a free bokkmarklet which makes using proper attribution a matter of one clic.


Hat tip to Maria Popova and Curator's Code for launching this initiative. 


Whether or not you will sign Curator's Code pledge, become an official web site supporting it, or adopt its bookmarklet instantly is not as important as the key idea behind it: by providing credit and attribution to pieces of content you find elsewhere, you not only honestly reward who has spent time to create that content, but you significantly boost the opportunity for thousands of others to connect, link up to, discover and make greater sense of their search for meaning.


Read Maria Popova introductory article to Curator's Code: http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/03/09/curators-code/ 


How to use the Curator's bookmarklet: http://vimeo.com/38243275 


Healthy. Inspiring. 9/10


Curator's Code official web site: http://curatorscode.org/ 


N.B.: Too bad that the Curator's Code bookmarklet doesn't work with Scoop.it, as the one excludes the other. But you could save the two codes for the special attribution characters in a text note and copy and paste whicever you need. Given the need for simplicity and integration this is not an ideal solution but I am sure that between Maria and Guillaume at Scoop.it they will find a way to make this work easily for all. Maria and Guillaume: what do you say?


more...
Beth Kanter's comment, March 11, 2012 10:01 AM
Thanks Robin for sharing and curating this article with your summary. I discovered it via Barbara Bray's collection where she had re scooped your scoop -- [and if following the curator's code added a via]. I came over here to rescoop (with a via!) because you are the original source and one of the links was broken (you corrected it and added an update) thus reminding me the importance of going to the original source. Here on scoop.it you can just follow the trail of the rescoop icon.

I am disappointed that the bookmarklet doesn't work together with the scoop.it one - but it would be great to have it integrated. Now to figure out how to rescoop it with the characters.
Robin Good's comment, March 11, 2012 10:12 AM
Hi Beth, thanks for your kind feedback. I was just out today for a video interview with Nancy White here in Rome, and she mentioned you as someone she likes for your ability to curate and make sense of things.

Re the integration of the curators' code icons, I have received feedback from Guillaume De Cugies of Scoop.it that he has been exchanging with Maria Popova and that he is looking with her for a way to integrate the two.

For now you can simply install the Curators' Code bookmarklet and use the "via"<a href="http://www.curatorscode.org" target="_blank" style="font-family:sans-serif;text-decoration:none" >&#x1525;</a> or hat tip <a href="http://www.curatorscode.org" target="_blank" style="font-family:sans-serif;text-decoration:none" >&#x21ac;</a> icons by copying and pasting their code into your scoops manually. The problem, at least for me is, that the scoop.it editing window is in the same position where the Curators' Code bookmarklet is and therefore I can't see both at the same time.

In any case I think it would be trivial for Scoop.it or any other tool to integrate such buttons directly into their system without having us to use two different tools for one task.
Karen Dietz's comment, March 11, 2012 6:36 PM
Many thanks Robin for the help! Somehow I missed the article -- computer fatigue probably :) I read it earlier today and look forward to using the codes. I'm thrilled to hear that scoop.it is looking into integrating them into the platform. Thanks for keeping us updated on this new, and important twist, for curating. Cheers -- Karen
Scooped by Robin Good
Scoop.it!

Content Strategy for Brands: Curation Is Next | Digiday

Content Strategy for Brands: Curation Is Next | Digiday | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Josh Sternberg at Digiday highlights a trend that is only going to get bigger in the near future: brands, as they realize the increasing need to be active publishers, are recognizing the problems and limitations that this task involves.


"The problem is publishing is a lot harder than it looks, or rather it’s a lot harder to do it with the consistency, day after day, that’s needed to build a long-term audience.


That’s leading some brands to hook onto the idea that their role lies more in the curation of content."


But in choosing this path, the article recommends, brands need to be careful in what and how much they curate. 


Here some valuable advice from the article:
 

"Brands need to be careful in not only what, but how much they curate.


There can’t be articles that make the reader question why a brand is sharing it.


Also, brands need to make sure they’re not just regurgitating content, but instead offering readers/followers valuable information, as readers will quickly determine the curated content — and thus the brand — is not worth their time.


Since consumers have their own tools for curating – Storify, Storyful, etc. – brands have to know each of their customers and have the credibility in their field to get consumers to trust the content they spread."


Truthful. 7/10


Full article: http://www.digiday.com/publishing/brands-apply-for-content-curator-roles/ 

more...
janlgordon's comment, February 25, 2012 9:01 AM
Hi Robin,
I went to the link you gave me below and somehow it didn't work, can you tell me where to look, I would love to hear about the class you're teaching and see the channels you reviewed, thanks so much:-)
Robin Good's comment, February 25, 2012 9:09 AM
Hi Jan,
I tried the link now and it does work ok for me. In any case here's a screenshot of the tweet: http://i.imgur.com/wlb6n.jpg
Re the class and the channels reviewed these are not visible as this was a paid online course and only the participants got all of the recordings. :-(
I can confirm you that I reviewed your work and listed you as a top example of good curation work while detailing your strong traits.
janlgordon's comment, February 25, 2012 8:50 PM
I am truly honored, thank you for all your kind and encouraging words, coming from you that means a lot Robin.
Scooped by Robin Good
Scoop.it!

Curators Can Build Trust and Relevance with Their Readers Only By Being Ruthless Relevance Evaluators

Curators Can Build Trust and Relevance with Their Readers Only By Being Ruthless Relevance Evaluators | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Back in 2010, Mahendra Palsule, wrote an interesting article on the "role of curation in the attention economy".


In it he wrote: "When you share something on any network, you are telling your social circle – “Look at this, this is something I think you will find interesting.”


In essence, you are asking for attention from your followers. Your followers distribute whatever attention currency they have budgeted for you among the things you share.


The attention each item receives depends on the total number of items you share. If you overdo it, you are reducing the value of each shared item...


What the formula doesn’t take into account is that by blindly and indiscriminately increasing one’s ‘give and take’ in social media, one is decreasing the relevance of one’s shares to one’s followers.


By ‘giving back’ to certain people, you’re at the same time ‘taking away’ from your other followers.


When the relevancy of your shares decrease, your reputation and trust declines."


Unless you are a ruthless relevance evaluator of whatever passes in front of your eyes, with an investigator attitude in researching and looking beyond the surface of each news story, the idea of gaining reputation, authority and visibility through curation may be only a trendy illusion.


"Social media tools might indicate you have a large number of followers, your ‘influence’ is ranked highly in terms of numbers, and you become popular as a friendly person. But your followers may not be clicking on the links you tweet or buying the products or services you recommend."


So, rule number one is to have focus and to share only what is truly and verified to be relevant for your audience.


"Curation is such a buzzword these days, that some have gone so far as to dub every act of social media sharing as ‘curation’ – from Foursquare check-ins to Blippy purchases, to Yelp reviews. I consider some of these examples as annotations or adding meta data to a crowdsourced database.


Considering each act of social media sharing as an act of curation is like considering all sex to be an act of love.


The one way I’ve seen true reputation and influence increase on the social web is when one’s shares are relevant to followers.


This necessitates a brutal and ruthless evaluation.


Is this content relevant to my followers? Irrespective of which influencer wrote it, irrespective of which ‘guru’ endorsed it, the relevance question is of prime consideration in deciding whether I endorse, share and propagate it to my followers."


Good. 8/10


Full article: http://www.skepticgeek.com/socialweb/role-of-curation-in-the-attention-economy/ 


(Image credit: www.spreadshirt.it)

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Good from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Scoop.it!

How to Use “Curation” to Boost Content “Creation”

How to Use “Curation” to Boost Content “Creation” | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

This piece was written by Heba Hosny, a guest blogger for Lauralee Walker

 

This article is full of wonderful tips for taking your curation to the next level and embellish your original content.

 

"Content curation rewards are not limited to branding and SEO; it can also enhance the visibility and the quality of your own content."

 

There are many things that caught my attention, here are just a few gems:

 

Curated Content Can Inspire Topics For Created Content

 

If you don't master this one, all the other tips won't make any sense

 

****Understand which topics are irresistible to your target audience

 

My Commentary:

 

I love this one!

 

Here's the tip

 

****Instead of taking the easy route of sharing the topic with your audience, write a blog post to "build on" it.

 

You can build on a topic in different ways:

 

**Beg to differ politely

 

**Provide additional tips and insights

 

**Ask clarifying question(s)

 

My Commentary:

 

This is a great way to add "context" it can start conversations, which invites others to add their comments, bring new observations and more information about a particular topic.

 

**A perfect segue to building relationships, community, doing business and increasing knowledge.

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/sJs2I8]


Via janlgordon
more...
janlgordon's comment, November 22, 2011 12:21 PM
Hi Beth,
I agree with you, I love the feeling of community and the collective wisdom, and you know "curation resonates with me":-)
janlgordon's comment, November 22, 2011 12:22 PM
Thanks so much for rescooping and sharing on twitter:-)
Pittsburgh Tote Bag Project's comment, November 25, 2011 6:17 PM
This has me thinking critically about how we are integrating social media. Inviting interaction has been a huge challenge. We are stimulating new conversations in real world time, but that's not reflected in comments and so forth. I like using Scoop.It widgets to get the newest scoop onto the bog in a timely manner and take some time to reflect on post content.
Rescooped by Robin Good from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Scoop.it!

How To Effectively Combine Curation With Your Content Strategy

How To Effectively Combine Curation With Your Content Strategy | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Margot Bloomstein, a content strategist talks about how to combine curation to your content strategy by showcasing lessons she has adopted from museum curators and so much more.

 

What caught my attention:

 

**She talks about copywriting issues. Because a curator goes way beyond aggregating which is just gathering content, they arrange it in order of relevance, point out what you should pay attention to and many other important things.  It takes a lot of thought to assemble pieces in a cohesive manner, add context to it, ad take it to the next level. 

 

**It is appropiate to give the curator credit if you're going to repost or use it in any manner.

 

http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2011/09/15/margot-bloomstein-combining-curation-with-your-content-strategy/

 

 


Via janlgordon
more...
Tom George's comment, March 20, 2012 6:19 AM
Hey Pedro,
I am the founder of Internet Billboards, my name is Tom George. Do you think you will be curated more on this topic and building a nice Scoop.it page? The reason I ask is I can show you how you can auto share your Scoop.it selections to Internet Billboards.