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Content Curation World
What a Content Curator Needs To Know: How, Tools, Issues and Strategy
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Why I Don't Like Scoopit Links on Twitter

Why I Don't Like Scoopit Links on Twitter | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

I’m seeing more Scoopit links in my Twitter stream and I’m not crazy about it.  Sure it’s quick and easy to share with Scoopit.  But it not quick and easy to consume. For me it's all about the econ...

Marty Note (here is comment I wrote on Dr. V's blog)

Appreciate Bryan’s and Joseph’s comment, but I rarely use Scoop.it as a pass through. More than 90% of the time I’m adding “rich snippets” to content I Scoop.

Rich snippets are “blog” posts that fall between Twitter and the 500 to 1,000 words I would write in Scenttrail Marketing. I often create original content ON Scoop.it because whatever I’m writing falls in the crack between Twitter’s micro blog and what I think of as needing to be on my marketing blog.


I was taught NOT to pass through links on Scoop.it early on by the great curator @Robin Good . Robin has well over 1M views on Scoop.it now and his advice along with the patient advice of other great Scoop.it curators has my profile slouching toward 150,000 views.


Bryan is correct that some curators new to Scoop.it haven’t learned the Robin Good lesson yet. I agree it is frustrating to go to a link and not receive anything of value back, to simply need to click on another link. Curators who pass through links won’t scale, so the Darwinian impact will be they will learn to add value or die out.


For my part I always identify my Scoop.it links, probably about half the content I Tweet and about a quarter of my G+ shares. I also routinely share my favorite “Scoopiteers”, great content curators who taught me valuable lessons such as don’t simply pass through links but add “micro blogging” value via rich snippets.


When you follow or consistently share content from a great curator on Scooop.it you begin to understand HOW they shape the subjects they curate. I know, for example, Robin Good is amazing on new tools. Scoop.it anticipated this learning and built in a feature where I can suggest something to Robin.


This is when Scoop.it is at its most crowdsourcing best because I now have an army of curators who know I like to comment on and share content about design or BI or startups and they (other Scoopiteers) keep an eye out for me. There are several reasons Scoop.it is a “get more with less effort” tool and this crowdsourcing my curation is high on the list.


So, sorry you are sad to see Scoop.it links and understand your frustration. You’ve correctly identified the problem too – some curators don’t know how to use the tool yet. I know it is a lot to ask to wait for the Darwinian learning that will take place over generations, but Scoop.it and the web have “generations” that have the half life of a gnat so trust that the richness of the Scoop.it community will win in the end and “the end” won’t take long.


To my fellow Scoop.it curators we owe Bryan and Joseph thanks for reminding us of what Robin Good taught me – add value or your Scoop.it won’t scale. That lessons is applicable to much more than how we use Scoop.it.


Marty

Added to G+ too
https://plus.google.com/102639884404823294558/posts/TUsNtsAsjWp

 


Via Martin (Marty) Smith
Robin Good's insight:

Well, I can't really agree more with Marty's point.

On the other hand Scoop.it, and a number of similar platforms,  are heavily promoted as a content marketing platforms that promise to a) save you time and b) allow you to post more content.

And then, unless you heavily moderate and surface editorial models that can guide other users, you tend to level down to the lowest common denominator. 

This is what I see happening and I regret it as well.

Thanks Marty for highlighting it. 

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Peg Corwin's comment, March 10, 3:54 PM
Further to Therese Torris' comment, might we ask Scoop.it for a setting that allows us to choose to automatically tweet the post author when we re-scoop? It takes many clicks back and forth to get and add it.
Martin (Marty) Smith's comment, March 10, 4:06 PM
Yes @Peg Corwin I see your "filtering" much like @Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com work as providing value. As Brian shared he discard much more content than he is sharing. I think this builds on Robin's idea of "value" and its meaningful, fast and valuable to those who understand that filtering is the primary activity. I don't think its hard to know this since the second time a customer follows a link of yours or Brian's they know they are following your curation suggestion. On Sunday I thought "pass through" was an unsustainable model. After a day of #startup school I am not so sure. You and Brian are building a themed castle one brick (one share) at a time as surely as I am or anyone else using Scoop.it. Today it feels like a defined link share as you and Brian have described is a valuable service. <br><br>You've hit the primary value AND I often cut the middle man out (something it isn't hard to do ust use Google to search the title). Bryan (Dr V) was complaining about the extra click and that is why I sometimes jump past the pass through too, but since that jump isn't difficult and the oeuvre you create has merit as a whole I think we are simply approach the same problem with a slightly different approach (pass through vs. value add). I think you and Brian are SAVING TIME since you evaluate mor content than you share. <br><br>Despite Dr. V's complaint about seeing Scoop.it links I think that is an important signal and a signals that connects the IDEA of your curation as a whole, so I would say when you drive to Scoop.it using a Scoop.it moniker is a good idea. M
Peg Corwin's comment, March 11, 6:19 AM
Thanks Marty. I think indexing a topic like this adds value in a different way to the curation. http://website.pegcorwin.com/p/4010710384/2013/11/09/popular-topics
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Guiding Customers To The Best Possible Products: That's What Retail Curation Is All About

Guiding Customers To The Best Possible Products: That's What Retail Curation Is All About | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

"The Motley Fool - As choice becomes overwhelming, the winners of the future retail war will be the ones who can help guide customers to the perfect products."

Robin Good's insight:



Motley's Fool contributor Andrew Marder   has written about the critical importance that curation will have for the retail universe by citing as relevant examples Netflix and Amazon.


Netflix for example officially states: "...instead of trying to have everything, we should strive to have the best in each category."


In short, curation looks to provide customers with the best possible products instead of the most products possible.


"Amazon has dabbled in curation through its lists system, which allows other users to make curated lists, and through its "customers who viewed this item also viewed..." capability.


...


The success of curation is going to come from the combination of massive selection and systematized suggestion.


The model that Amazon is skirting the edges of gives consumers the ability to both drive their own choices and discover new ways to spend their money. As the algorithms that choose these recommendations become more powerful, the businesses will find higher strike rates with the suggestions.


My comment: Undoubtedly, a growing trend emerging for online retailers is the need to focus on selecting and curating the most relevant products, rather than all of those available, for their specific tribe. This is why those retailers capable of finding and hiring quality curators (or leveraging their users passions) to organize and showcase their product line-ups will be enjoying greater conversions and sales than those simply using algo-based selections.  

Expert advice and trusted suggestions work a lot better than any algo.



Rightful. Insightful. 8/10


Full article: http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2013/05/23/the-future-of-retail-is-curation.aspx


(Image credit: Pair of shoes circle by Shutterstock)


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Alfred Hankell's curator insight, August 11, 2013 4:27 PM
Robin Good's insight:

 

 

Motley's Fool contributor Andrew Marder   has written about the critical importance that curation will have for the retail universe by citing as relevant examples Netflix and Amazon.

 

Netflix for example officially states: "...instead of trying to have everything, we should strive to have the best in each category."

 

In short, curation looks to provide customers with the best possible products instead of the most products possible.

 

"Amazon has dabbled in curation through itslists system, which allows other users to make curated lists, and through its "customers who viewed this item also viewed..." capability.

 

...

 

The success of curation is going to come from the combination of massive selection and systematized suggestion.


The model that Amazon is skirting the edges of gives consumers the ability to both drive their own choices and discover new ways to spend their money. As the algorithms that choose these recommendations become more powerful, the businesses will find higher strike rates with the suggestions.

 

My comment: Undoubtedly, a growing trend emerging for online retailers is the need to focus on selecting and curating the most relevant products, rather than all of those available, for their specific tribe. This is why those retailers capable of finding and hiring quality curators (or leveraging their users passions) to organize and showcase their product line-ups will be enjoying greater conversions and sales than those simply using algo-based selections.   

Expert advice and trusted suggestions work a lot better than any algo.

 

 

Rightful. Insightful. 8/10

 

Full article:http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2013/05/23/the-future-of-retail-is-curation.aspx

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Curators Are The True Influencers

Curators Are The True Influencers | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



Here's an inspiring short article by Elia Morling on the role of curators in storytelling.


Elia reports of a discussion he has had with netnographer Olga Kravets, in which she suggested that: "...curators serve their tribe like dumpster divers.

They dive into containers to rummage through heaps of garbage to find useful stuff that can be re-purposed. When they are done they bring forth their scavenged gifts to their tribe."


But here, is the most compelling part as Elia really seems to have distilled and illustrated here the three key and most valuable traits of a modern content curator:


a) Curators represent a new type of tribal leadership that operates bottom-up and peer to peer.

b) As a member of a tribe, curators will always be more native and relevant than any outsiders will ever be.


c) Within a tribe they are not only appreciated for leveraging their insider skills, but for sustaining and developing their culture."



Definitely worth reading. Inspiring. 8/10


Full post: http://tribaling.com/blog/2013/05/15/curators-and-tribal-currency/




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Marco Bertolini's curator insight, June 22, 2013 1:10 AM

Elias Morling estime que les curateurs sont comme les "dumpster divers", ces militants qui fouillent les poubelles.  Et ils les appelle les "vrais influenceurs" car :

 

1. Les curateurs représentent un nouveau type de leadership tribal bottom up et peer-to-peer.

 

2. En tant que membres d'une tribu, les curateurs seront toujours plus "natives" que n'importe qui parlant de l'extérieur.

 

3. Au sein de la tribu, ils sont appréciés non seulement pour leurs compétences, mais aussi parce qu'ils entretiennent et développent leur propre culture.

 

Un article inspirant de http://www.linkedin.com/in/emorling que vous pouvez lire ici : http://tribaling.com/blog/2013/05/15/curators-and-tribal-currency/

 

Ness Crouch's curator insight, June 22, 2013 2:05 PM

Excellent article and video. Looking at the wonderful world of the internet and curation. The idea of curation of online content has become more and more inportant with the exponential growth of content on the world wide web. Being able to organise and manage all of the content is important.

 

Curation is about making good choices about what you share and putting it into a context for themselves and others. Being enthusiastic and thoughtful about what you choose is a way of showing what you are finding and sharing is signficant and worthwhile. 

 

Finding the most interesting and valuable things and sharing that is the key. What you want and what you are interested in is important but you also need to consider your audience. 

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How Worthless Stuff on eBay Becomes Art and the Collector-Curator Becomes an Artist

How Worthless Stuff on eBay Becomes Art and the Collector-Curator Becomes an Artist | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Robin Good: If you seriously and systematically curate a topic, your work may be soon considered as good as collector's art, not because of the individual value of each piece you include, but thanks to your ability to orchestrate a strong and consistent "theme".


In this article inspired by the Three Graces photographic collection who was recently bought by New York collector Peter J. Cohen, Deanna Alshad writes how much she likes Stephanie Terelak as she captures the essence of this photograph collection: "The lines of collector, curator, and artist are blurred in this case.


Individually, these photographs are worth very little, probably a few dollars on ebay I would guess.


But amassed, sorted, and curated in large specific groups, seemingly worthless stuff on ebay becomes art and the collector becomes artist, selecting each piece to belong to a greater whole that our best museums’ curators deemed worthy of their walls."


And then she adds: "This can nearly be said of any collection. Collections are works of art, like collages or mixed media projects — or bonsai trees.


Often continuously in process, collections are nearly alive with the story narrated by each individual collector’s act of collecting.


Each curates — feeds and prunes — for meaning and growth as well as with an artistic eye, to tell stories with objects."



Inspiring. Rightful. 8/10


Full article: http://www.inherited-values.com/2012/08/collectors-are-like-artists-collections-like-works-of-art/



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Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics

Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Must-read article on ClutterMuseum.com by Leslie M-B, exploring in depth the opportunity to have students master their selected topics by "curating" them, rather than by reading and memorizing facts about them.


"Critical and creative thinking should be prioritized over remembering content"


"That students should learn to think for themselves may seem like a no-brainer to many readers, but if you look at the textbook packages put out by publishers, you’ll find that the texts and accompanying materials (for both teachers and students) assume students are expected to read and retain content—and then be tested on it.


Instead, between middle school (if not earlier) and college graduation, students should practice—if not master—how to question, critique, research, and construct an argument like an historian."


This is indeed the critical point. Moving education from an effort to memorize things on which then to be tested, to a collaborative exercise in creating new knowledge and value by pulling and editing together individual pieces of content, resources and tools that allow the explanation/illustration of a topic from a specific viewpoint/for a specific need.


And I can't avoid to rejoice and second her next proposition: "What if we shifted the standards’ primary emphasis from content, and not to just the development of traditional skills—basic knowledge recall, document interpretation, research, and essay-writing—but to the cultivation of skills that challenge students to make unconventional connections, skills that are essential for thriving in the 21st century?"


What are these skills, you may ask. Here is a good reference where to look them up: http://www.p21.org/storage/documents/P21_Framework_Definitions.pdf (put together by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills)



Recommended. Good stuff. 9/10


Full article: www.cluttermuseum.com/make-students-curators/


(Image credit: Behance.net)



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Audrey's curator insight, August 13, 2013 2:01 PM

Brilliant.  This is an example of what is known as "flipping" where the student is directed to where information can be found, e.g. Youtube, websites, powerpoint, etc and set critical evaluative questions.

 

Home School Learning is an ideal example of students as curators of their learning. It is essential for children to learn to be in charge of their learning from pre-school in order to develop essential evaluative and critical analytical skills. audrey@homeschoolsource.co.uk.

 

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 13, 2013 4:43 PM

I had a similar conversation yesterday and as I prepare my lit review this thinking has emerged. It is less about content and more about skills, attitudes, habits, practices, etc. in learning.

Priscilla Der's curator insight, April 6, 7:12 PM

This article is a reminder that as we are curating content as teachers so are students. Rather then memorizing or reciting textbook facts, students should be able to steer and set their own learning goals (this is where PBL) comes into mind. 

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Are Curators the Gatekeepers of Knowledge Transmission? Ann Blair on The History of Information

Are Curators the Gatekeepers of Knowledge Transmission? Ann Blair on The History of Information | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

The history professor and author of Too Much to Know tells us what researchers have been discovering about how earlier human societies collected, organised and used information...

 

Amazing read and historical perspective about transmission. Knowledge and information are actually very different concept :

 

"This book doesn’t actually focus on the term information but it talks about the institutions that made knowledge possible. Its first volume runs “From Gutenberg to Diderot" – in other words, mid-15th to mid-18th century.

 

A second volume stretches “From the Encyclopédie to Wikipedia”, from the mid-18th century to the 21st century.

 

Peter Burke is a great cultural historian who has worked on many different aspects of the transmission of knowledge – including, for example, how historians worked, or how ideas about good behaviour at court were transmitted.

 

In this synthetic pair of books he explores the question: What were the institutions that were collecting, classifying, sorting and disseminating information?"

 

In our world now where information is everywhere, how you make sure that knowledge is still accessible?

 

Curation is now not only a great means to express yourself but also an obvious path to become a gatekeeper and a qualitative filter.

 

This article gives an awesome perspective on an universal and eternal inspiring mission : transmission.

 

Full article: http://thebrowser.com/interviews/ann-blair-on-history-information

 

 


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What Is Curation and Why It's So Relevant? [Video]

Robin Good: A great video animation introducing some of the key ideas, dreams and concepts behind content curation.

 

From the video: "One of the most beautiful things about the Internet is this sort of radical discovery, where you start in a place that you are familiar with, that you trust, and then you drill down and down and chase the white rabbit and then you end up in some wonderland you didn't know existed.


The clip includes thoughts from some unique curators, picked and selected by Percolate, the company sponsoring this video. 


Inspiring. Insightful. 8/10


Find out more / watch original video: http://vimeo.com/38524181   

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How to Use “Curation” to Boost Content “Creation”

How to Use “Curation” to Boost Content “Creation” | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

This piece was written by Heba Hosny, a guest blogger for Lauralee Walker

 

This article is full of wonderful tips for taking your curation to the next level and embellish your original content.

 

"Content curation rewards are not limited to branding and SEO; it can also enhance the visibility and the quality of your own content."

 

There are many things that caught my attention, here are just a few gems:

 

Curated Content Can Inspire Topics For Created Content

 

If you don't master this one, all the other tips won't make any sense

 

****Understand which topics are irresistible to your target audience

 

My Commentary:

 

I love this one!

 

Here's the tip

 

****Instead of taking the easy route of sharing the topic with your audience, write a blog post to "build on" it.

 

You can build on a topic in different ways:

 

**Beg to differ politely

 

**Provide additional tips and insights

 

**Ask clarifying question(s)

 

My Commentary:

 

This is a great way to add "context" it can start conversations, which invites others to add their comments, bring new observations and more information about a particular topic.

 

**A perfect segue to building relationships, community, doing business and increasing knowledge.

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/sJs2I8]


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janlgordon's comment, November 22, 2011 12:21 PM
Hi Beth,
I agree with you, I love the feeling of community and the collective wisdom, and you know "curation resonates with me":-)
janlgordon's comment, November 22, 2011 12:22 PM
Thanks so much for rescooping and sharing on twitter:-)
Pittsburgh Tote Bag Project's comment, November 25, 2011 6:17 PM
This has me thinking critically about how we are integrating social media. Inviting interaction has been a huge challenge. We are stimulating new conversations in real world time, but that's not reflected in comments and so forth. I like using Scoop.It widgets to get the newest scoop onto the bog in a timely manner and take some time to reflect on post content.
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The Future of Search May Not Be About Google: It's You In The End Who Will Decide

The Future of Search May Not Be About Google: It's You In The End Who Will Decide | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
There is a evil side of Google which revealed itself in the Filter Bubble, invasion of privacy, the lack of transparency, in the monopoly induction of behavior and especially in what is happening in the search environment.
Robin Good's insight:



The future of search may not just be about Google and Bing. In the future of search, believe it or not, there are going to be a lot of people like you and me who will be providing much more helpful information guidance to specific requests than Google could ever do.


I know this sounds probably unrealistic to you, but I think there are now many good indications that this likely going to happen much sooner than you expect.


One of the key reasons why, human beings will start to reclaim this highly valuable search territory, is the fact that in the last few years we have slowly but deeply surrendered our ability to evaluate, decide and select what is "real" to Google's own algorithms, in ways that can only be detrimental to us.


You have probably read in recent times that Google is moving to use "semantic search" rather than the keyword-based approach it has been using until now. 


Do you know that "in semantic search, the decisions are not based on statistics, but rather on world models"?


"How about searching for "Dictators of the World?" The results, which include a list of famous dictators, are not just the judgment of whether someone is a dictator, but also an implicit judgment of choosing individual examples for the concept of a dictator. 


When building knowledge over concepts such as "Dictator" in the search engines, we are implicitly accepting a set of assumptions."


"It is needed to question and monitor these models, for in the past, the significance was only in the human mind. Now, it is also in the mind of the engines that forward us information. 


The search bears an editorial point of view, and its results reflect this point of view. 


We can’t ignore the assumptions behind these results. The invisible judgments will frame our conscience."


Here is a must read article by Zeh Fernandes, that wants to ignite an open discussion about "how the Google monopoly is affecting the way we search for and receive information on the internet".


I think that this is a topic deserving the highest attention and I highly recommend to read in full this excellent article, especially to content curators, information librarians and any other individual concerned with our future ability to vet, organize and make sense of the ocean of information surrounding us.


Alternative search tools and content curators are the future.



Good reminder of what we are eating daily. Insightful. Eye-opening. 10/10


Read this: http://zehfernandes.com/the-evil-side-of-google/ 








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Stephen Dale's curator insight, January 13, 2:58 AM

People who use Google are given the impression that they are interacting with the data out there, but they are actually interacting with Google and its view of the world.

 

"They are prediction engines that constantly refine a theory about who you are and what you are going to do or want next. Together, they create an universe of data for each one of us."

"In a 2010 paper published in the Scientific American journal, Tim Berners-Lee warned about companies developing ever more “closed” products and “data islands”.

"Morville, in his book Search Patterns, says that the first and second results receive 80% of attention. The vertical approach suggests to the user the idea of a single result that fully answers the question, enclosing possibilities and preventing alternative realization."


Or in other words, is our acceptance of what we see in search results eroding our ability (or willingness) to consider alternatives and employ critical thinking?

Lucy Beaton's curator insight, January 16, 5:21 PM

This is alarming.  We, as Teacher Librarians, need to be aware of the ramifications of this.

Mrs. Dilling's curator insight, February 13, 8:52 AM

My favorite statement, "we must always be aware and well informed about the intentions of companies, and never stop having multiple options for any service."

 

This article was an eye opener for me. I had never questioned Google before.

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Content Curation Not an Option in Schools: Librarians To Lead the Change

Content Curation Not an Option in Schools: Librarians To Lead the Change | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

"School librarians can use curation as a tool to position themselves as information and communication authorities and information professionals."

Robin Good's insight:



Joyce Valenza, a teacher librarian and a prolific writer, has published at the end of 2012 a great article explaining the relevance and benefits that content curation can bring to the education world and the importance that school and college librarians may play in this major transformation.


Besides effectively introducing curation, its role and reason to be by utilizing some highly qualified references, the article focuses on the reasons that make librarians uniquely qualified to curate and the benefits that can derive from effectively utilizing curation in their activities.


The benefits and applications of using curation are reviewed as well as the potential for curation to be highly beneficial also beyond the education and learning world.


Joyce Valenza also points for example to search, as a likely area in which curation may play very soon a much more important role than search engines have played this far.


From the original article: "Curation tools present an exciting new genre of search tool. Searchers can now exploit the curated efforts or the bibliographies of experts and others who take the lead in a particular subject area—those who volunteer to scan the real-time environment as scouts.


They also present the opportunity to guide learners in new evaluation strategies. Who is the curator? Which curators can you trust? Is a curator attached to a team, publication, institution, organization? How can the quality of their insights, selections, sources, and feeds be judged? Do their efforts have many followers? Is their curation active and current?


By linking to the search pages of the major curation tools, school librarians can help students, faculty, and parents with more long-tail needs access the expertise of a subject expert or a curator with a passion for an issue.


...


What has been discovered is that curation rocks as a search/current awareness tool especially for issues in the news, controversial topics, and long-tail interests."


An excellent set of tools and curation resources at the end, provide extra value to an already excellent reference article.



A must-read article for anyone involved in research, education, teaching and in information library sciences.


Recommended. Informative. Resourceful. 8/10


Original article: http://www.schoollibrarymonthly.com/articles/Valenza2012-v29n1p20.html


(Image - Librarian from Shutterstock)


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Luis Alberto Velasco's curator insight, October 18, 2013 7:57 AM

Estamos evolucionando

Kathy Schrock's curator insight, January 23, 4:00 PM

Librarians have been doing this for years, but now have many tools to pick from!

Angel Somers's curator insight, February 2, 10:31 AM

LIbrarians are natural curators! It's what we do, so it makes sense that we should take the initiative to promot curation as a valuable skill for both our colleagues and our students.

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Artists and Not Algorithms Should Curate Our Music Discoveries

Artists and Not Algorithms Should Curate Our Music Discoveries | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Maurice Boucher takes a stand for human curators in the arts, by placing string emphasis on the fact that purely alorithmic solutions cannot really discern people expressed needs and desires from unexpressed ones.


His central point is this: "At the heart of the online music curation role is the possible solution to the expressed need versus unexpressed desire problem that permeates the Internet and prevents us from developing internet culture beyond purely commercial interests."


He writes: "...I know of no algorithm that can work out the difference between what people ask for and what they actually desire.


That is the philosophical question that really is the core software requirement of a music recommendation engine, and music curation is an ideal testbed case to see if we can build a layer on the internet to act as verification of the search process.


...communicating socially and informally (with strangers) and sharing music is not enough to build a bridge between what people ask for and what they desire.


People have to have a sense that some agency is acting at least semi-exclusively for them and has some insight into who they are."


"At the heart of the online music curation role is the possible solution to the expressed need verses unexpressed desire problem that permeates the Internet and prevents us from developing internet culture beyond purely commercial interests."


"The artists have to be included in the equations that run the algorithms of curation and filtering for the internet to have a future beyond being just another compendium of useless facts and trivia."



Rightful. 8/10


Full article: http://north.com/thinking/guest-post-web-curation-and-filtering-defining-new-roles-for-digital-artists/



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The Curators Conference: New York, September 5th

The Curators Conference: New York, September 5th | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Featuring the likes of fashion blogger Susie Bubble, filmmaker Gia Coppola, Evan Oresten from Cool Hunting and Carrie Scott of SHOWStudio to Philippe Von Borries (co-founder of Refinery29), Chris Corrado (Director of Capsule), Warren Fu (music video director for artists including Mark Ronson and The Strokes) and Soraya Darabi (founder of Foodspotting), Curators Conference will take place in a few weeks at the Walter Reade Theatre, Lincoln Center in New Yok City.


Here some more details: "...during New York Fashion Week on the 5th September , online channel Portable is presenting The Curators Conference, a day long event featuring the leading international curators and creatives across fashion, film, music, design and technology.


The event aims to, 'explore the many worlds where curation and creativity intersect with modern culture', hoping to inspire audiences and foster industry innovation."

(Source: Prote.in)



From the official site: "A day-long conference featuring the leading curators and creators of culture across fashion, film, music, interiors and design."


Tickets (start at $295): http://curatorsconference.eventbrite.com/


Find out more: http://portable.tv/curatorsconference



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No More Media Gatekeepers: Curators Are All We Need

No More Media Gatekeepers: Curators Are All We Need | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Giuseppe Mauriello: This is my “scoop” article for today. I found this article written by Suw Charman-Anderson in November of 2006 from her first professional blog “Strange Attractor”,  now permanently moved to charman-anderson.com.

 

Suw is journalist, social technologist consultant and writer, one of the UK’s social media pioneers. 

Returning to her article... the author describes the scenario of the digital industry at the time (2006), then she raises some interesting  points about the need of content curation and the importance of the curator role. Here are some gems excerpted from it:

We already have more movies available than any one person can watch; more videos on YouTube; more blogs… more everything. It’s not like we’re starting from a point of scarcity here. And the flood of stuff is going to turn into a rampaging torrent as more people get online and more people get excited by their ability to participate and create.

In the past, the media acted as gatekeepers.


They were the ones that went to the movie previews…
They were the ones who got the advance copy of the game…
They were the arbiters of taste, the people in the know, the ones with the connections needed to get at culture before us plebs got at it.

But we don’t need gatekeepers anymore. We don’t need people who stand between us and our stuff, deciding what to tell us about and what to ignore. We don’t need arbiters of taste.

We do, however, still need help. There’s just too much stuff around for us to know what’s out there, to keep up with what’s good, what works for us, what is worth investigation. What we need are curators.

We need people who can gather together the things that are of interest to us, things that fit with our tastes or challenge us in interesting ways, things that enrich our lives and help us enjoy our time rather than waste it on searching.

Curators already exist. Some are people: Bloggers who sift through tonnes of stuff in order to highlight what they like, and who, if you have the same taste as them, can be invaluable to discovering new things to like.


But curation of the web has barely started. Much of what you could call curation that exists today is flawed: too many noisy opinions and not enough capacity to understand what I as an individual want…

 

I loved this article and title that the author chose for it.

Read the original article here:
http://strange.corante.com/2006/11/08/the-democratisation-of-everything-and-the-curators-who-will-save-our-collective-ass


Via Giuseppe Mauriello
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Dasom Ssomy Kim's comment, May 8, 2013 2:52 AM
Content curation, not gatekeeping. people can choose
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Curators: A Herculean Task Is Ahead of You - and Be Careful

Curators: A Herculean Task Is Ahead of You - and Be Careful | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Steven Rosenbaum has an interesting article on Fast Company, outlining the reasons why curation is here to stay and the importance that curators will play in your information consumption diet.


He writes: "...So anyone who steps up and volunteers to curate in their area of knowledge and passion is taking on a Herculean task.


They're going to stand between the web and their readers, using all of the tools at their disposal to "listen" to the web, and then pull out of the data stream nuggets of wisdom, breaking news, important new voices, and other salient details.


It's real work, and requires a tireless commitment to being engaged and ready to rebroadcast timely material.


While there may be an economic benefit for being a "thought leader" and "trusted curator," it's not going to happen overnight.


Which is to say, being a superhero is often a thankless job.


The growth in content, both in terms of pure volume and the speed of publishing, has raised some questions about what best practices are in the curation space."


He also has some pretty straightforward advice on what, as a curator, you should never do:


"1. If you don't add context, or opinion, or voice and simply lift content, it's stealing.


2. If you don't provide attribution, and a link back to the source, it's stealing.


3. If you take a large portion of the original content, it's stealing.


4. If someone asks you not to curate their material, and you don't respect that request, it's stealing.


5. Respect published rights. If images don't allow creative commons use, reach out to the image creator--don't just grab it and ask questions later."


And he definitely has a point on all of these. 


Recommended. 7/10


Read the full article: http://www.fastcompany.com/1834177/content-curators-are-the-new-superheros-of-the-web?partner=rss 

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Jonathan Rattray Clark's comment, April 17, 2012 10:14 PM
Scooping it .........thanks Robin I really like your curation .... And value your wisdom ......it seems there is purpose to my constant information minning as and educator artist and passionate information collector .......I find it incredibly exciting to find fresh thinking and response to the living world around us and in particular our individual passions. Thank you for your wisdom
Robin Good's comment, April 17, 2012 10:16 PM
Thank you Jonathan. Glad to be of help and inspiration to you.

Tony Gu's comment, April 19, 2012 10:30 PM
I am really enjoying reading this article.
I found that the way Robin Good curate this article truly practice the ‘No Stealing’ rules. Thanks for sharing this with all of us. Big up!
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Content Curators Will Be The New Great (Specialized) Newspapers [Video]

Robin Good: John McCarus, SVP for Brand Content at Digitas, ignites an interesting panel about content creation vs content curation.


This is the second in a series of three videos highlighting a 2012 conversation on the future of media on the social web organized by Ben Elowitz, CEO of Wetpaint.

The nicely edited video, brings up in its four minutes, some valuable takes and opinions on how curation is perceived, used and modulated to achieve different results and objectives.


From mere republishing and copying of someone else materials without attribution or credit (certainly not something to be categorized under "curation") to the new cadre of emerging journalists, who not only write, but also monitor, research, pre-digest and cull the most interesting content - not written by them - for their own audiences.


Key takeaways:


A curator is an editor, essentially. You become a trusted source by doing the hard work for your audience and telling them what’s important, whether you’ve written it or not.

Traditionally that’s been the role of great newspapers; now that function is being spread across the web.

Erick Schonfeld, TechCrunch


-> Publishers have a love / hate relationship with curators.


-> Curators help to expand a publisher’s reach, but the publisher risks losing credit (and traffic).


-> Curators who link back and republish only enough to pique interest will keep publishers happy.


It’s like the forest episode of Planet Earth: the animal eats the nectar and sort of destroys the plant but spreads the pollen all over.

Jason Hirschhorn, Media ReDEFined


Interesting. 7/10


Original video: http://vimeo.com/37553245 


Full article: http://digitalquarters.net/2012/02/video-rebooting-media-think-tank-content-creation-vs-curation/ 

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Jeff Makana's comment, March 2, 2012 12:34 AM
Great improvements on delivery of content Robin, Your analysis give the reader added insights. In support and solidarity!