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Content Curation World
What a Content Curator Needs To Know: How, Tools, Issues and Strategy
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Algorithms: The Glue Between Content, Data and Insight

Algorithms: The Glue Between Content, Data and Insight | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:


Lutz Finger, reports from SxSW on the topic of algorithms, curation and the future, as the skills of content creators, data analysts and code programmers are seemingly converging for the first time. 


Among others, he reports Steve Rosenbaum (founder of Magnify.net) significant own words at SxSW: "...a wise combination of human judgement enabled by algorithms will become the new king of content."


But while there are great new tools, startups and ideas leveraging the great potential of big data and human curation, there is a big, invisible danger, still looming on us.


"The danger is that any algorithm might fall prey to someone trying to influence it.

This might be the ones programming the algorithm or the users. We for instance saw governments trying to skew algorithms by introducing fake online personas (
Learn more about the US government persona-management software).
 

But the biggest and realest danger lies in us.

If we believe that there is only one truth and that is the one generated by a black-box algorithm we might be deceived easily."



Informative. Resourceful. 7/10



Full article: http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20140320132545-6074593-the-age-of-the-algorithms-sxsw-summary 


See also: www.masternewmedia.org/future-of-search


Image: Bjoern Ognibeni - SxSW




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Georges Millet's curator insight, March 25, 1:10 AM

Knowledge & life turning today into a (google) search. Algorithms are key!  

Stephen Dale's curator insight, March 26, 1:35 AM

"We are in the era of the algorithm. They decide what news we will see, they decide which person is important and they will even merge more and more into our non-digital lives.

 

But the biggest and realest danger lies in us. If we believe that there is only one truth and that is the one generated by a black-box algorithm we might be deceived easily."

 

A reminder, then, that algorithm's should not take the place of critical thinking.

Mariale Peñalosa Arguijo's curator insight, March 26, 6:44 AM

 

 10
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The Future Of Content Curation Tools - Part II

The Future Of Content Curation Tools - Part II | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
In the coming months and years, I expect content curation tools are going to play a very important role in many different fields.
Robin Good's insight:



Here is Part II of my look at the future of content curation tools and at what features and facilities they are likely to introduce in the coming months and years.


While In Part I I have looked at:

  • Display formats
  • Slicing & Dicing
  • Micro - Macro
  • Recurating
  • News discovery
  • Ownership
  • Credit & Attribution


In Part II I am checking out:

  • Preservation
  • Private collections
  • Full capture abilities
  • Monetization
  • Content types begging ti be curated
  • Beyond news, articles and mood boards
  • Specialized curation tools


Here's the full story: http://www.masternewmedia.org/content-curation-tools-future-part2/ 


See also: http://www.masternewmedia.org/content-curation-tools-future-part1/ 





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Marirosa Del Po's curator insight, January 3, 9:05 AM

Seconda e ultima parte (in inglese) dell'articolo di Robin Good sugli strumenti della Content Curation.

SMOOC's curator insight, February 20, 10:27 AM

Interesting write up on content curation tools from Robin Good (pt. 2)

TeresaSiluar's curator insight, April 12, 10:29 AM

Segunda parte del artículo de Robin Good, sobre herramientas de content curation

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Collaborative Curation and Personalization The Future of Museums: A Study Report

Collaborative Curation and Personalization  The Future of Museums: A Study Report | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

This report highlights a number of key trends that will have a significant impact on the user experience and design of future collections and museums.

Robin Good's insight:



Picture these scenarios:
 

  • The Victoria & Albert Museum, its collections depleted by massive repatriation, becomes a travel & tourism guide and international affairs ambassador in an increasingly globalized community
     
  • The Freud Museum, in the spirit of its namesake, becomes a provider of mental retreat and therapy (I wonder if the docents will be licensed psychoanalysis?)

These, according to the 40-page report Museums in a Digital Age” from Arups, may actually be some of the likely new profiles of prestigious museums 25 years from now.  


The report projects that:


"...future museums will see personalised content, new levels of sustainability and a visitor experience extended beyond present expectations of time and space."


  • A rising desire among audiences to shape their own cultural experiences (“Collaborative Curation”)
     
  • The opportunity for museum to become “curators of experiences” that extend beyond the boundaries of traditional exhibits or programs, or beyond the walls of the museum itself.


Source: http://futureofmuseums.blogspot.it/2013/11/museums-in-future-view-from-across-pond.html 

 
The idea of "collaborative curation" of museum collections by the actual users-visitors, is particularly fascinating. 

"Just as current consumer trends shift towards collaborative consumption, in the future, museums may employ new patterns of collaborative curation, allowing for individually curated experiences and giving the public greater control over both content and experience.

Increased visitor participation will allow people themselves to reinvent the museum experience, enabling content that can adapt to the preferences of users in real-time."


My comment: If you are a curator and are interested in exploring and understanding what the future of large collections and museums may look like and which forces are going to be driving such changes, this is a good report to read.


Insightful. Inspiring 8/10



Original Report: Museums in the Digital Age: 
http://www.arup.com/Publications/Museums_in_the_Digital_Age.aspx 


PDF: http://www.arup.com/~/media/Files/PDF/Publications/Research_and_whitepapers/2013_Arup_FRI_MuseumsintheDigitalAge_final_web.ashx 




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Jennifer Moss's curator insight, November 8, 2013 3:47 PM

This is like the 'Horizon Report' for museums. 

Jennifer Ryan's curator insight, November 10, 2013 2:04 PM

This is right up my alley. Looking forward to reading about trends and impacts.

Erica Bilder's curator insight, November 15, 2013 4:11 AM

I have nothing to add to Robin Good's terrific insights:

 Robin Good's insight:

 

 

Picture these scenarios:
 

The Victoria & Albert Museum, its collections depleted by massive repatriation, becomes a travel & tourism guide and international affairs ambassador in an increasingly globalized community
 The Freud Museum, in the spirit of its namesake, becomes a provider of mental retreat and therapy (I wonder if the docents will be licensed psychoanalysis?)

These, according to the 40-page report “Museums in a Digital Age” from Arups, may actually be some of the likely new profiles of prestigious museums 25 years from now.  

 

The report projects that:

 

"...future museums will see personalised content, new levels of sustainability and a visitor experience extended beyond present expectations of time and space."

 

A rising desire among audiences to shape their own cultural experiences (“Collaborative Curation”)
 The opportunity for museum to become “curators of experiences” that extend beyond the boundaries of traditional exhibits or programs, or beyond the walls of the museum itself.

 

Source: http://futureofmuseums.blogspot.it/2013/11/museums-in-future-view-from-across-pond.html ;

 The idea of "collaborative curation" of museum collections by the actual users-visitors, is particularly fascinating.  "Just as current consumer trends shift towards collaborative consumption, in the future, museums may employ new patterns of collaborative curation,allowing for individually curated experiences and giving the public greater control over both content and experience.
Increased visitor participation will allow people themselves to reinvent the museum experience, enabling content that can adapt to the preferences of users in real-time." 

 

My comment: If you are a curator and are interested in exploring and understanding what the future of large collections and museums may look like and which forces are going to be driving such changes, this is a good report to read.

 

Insightful. Inspiring 8/10



Original Report: Museums in the Digital Age: 
http://www.arup.com/Publications/Museums_in_the_Digital_Age.aspx ;

 

PDF: http://www.arup.com/~/media/Files/PDF/Publications/Research_and_whitepapers/2013_Arup_FRI_MuseumsintheDigitalAge_final_web.ashx 

 

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Why Crowdsourcing Future Is Moving To Curation, Synthesis and Things

Why Crowdsourcing Future Is Moving To Curation, Synthesis and Things | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



Gaurav Mishra does an excellent job in explaining and illustrating in greater depth the concepts and ideas introduced in his presentation: Future of Crowdsourcing: Creation to Curation, Search to Synthesis, Content to Things.


The key axiom in the article is that crowdsourcing is slowly shifting: 

a) in terms of input: from creation to curation,

b) in terms of output: from search to synthesis, and

c) in terms of focus: from content to things.


For example when it comes to input, we are moving from crowdsourcing platforms that helped us to create logos or simple graphic designs to new services that will actually curate for us the best design candidates to take into consideration.


A great enlightnening example of this shift, can be seen by looking at one of the many excellent resources listed in this article: ImageBrief, an online service which connects creatives with photographers, who themselves handpick images from their hard disks to match the criteria listed in the submitted creative briefs. 


My comment: Gaurav comprehensive vision and ability to spot relevant shifts and trends is not only uncanny, but also systematic. No matter which article or presentation you look at in his collection you can be sure to find something always of value. 


Excellent. Insightful. Resourceful. 9/10


Full article: http://gauravonomics.com/future-crowdsourcing-trends/ 





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María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, November 16, 2013 5:13 AM

Great one.

Olinda Turner's curator insight, November 20, 2013 2:57 PM

Although directed at content marketing, these ideas translate into technical communications where users are trying to help each other find the best technical content. I totally agree that the fundamental way in which we communicate through content is shifting.

irene's curator insight, January 10, 6:16 AM

Perché il futuro del Crowdsourcing va in direzione della cura, sintesi e cose varie.

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Guiding Customers To The Best Possible Products: That's What Retail Curation Is All About

Guiding Customers To The Best Possible Products: That's What Retail Curation Is All About | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

"The Motley Fool - As choice becomes overwhelming, the winners of the future retail war will be the ones who can help guide customers to the perfect products."

Robin Good's insight:



Motley's Fool contributor Andrew Marder   has written about the critical importance that curation will have for the retail universe by citing as relevant examples Netflix and Amazon.


Netflix for example officially states: "...instead of trying to have everything, we should strive to have the best in each category."


In short, curation looks to provide customers with the best possible products instead of the most products possible.


"Amazon has dabbled in curation through its lists system, which allows other users to make curated lists, and through its "customers who viewed this item also viewed..." capability.


...


The success of curation is going to come from the combination of massive selection and systematized suggestion.


The model that Amazon is skirting the edges of gives consumers the ability to both drive their own choices and discover new ways to spend their money. As the algorithms that choose these recommendations become more powerful, the businesses will find higher strike rates with the suggestions.


My comment: Undoubtedly, a growing trend emerging for online retailers is the need to focus on selecting and curating the most relevant products, rather than all of those available, for their specific tribe. This is why those retailers capable of finding and hiring quality curators (or leveraging their users passions) to organize and showcase their product line-ups will be enjoying greater conversions and sales than those simply using algo-based selections.  

Expert advice and trusted suggestions work a lot better than any algo.



Rightful. Insightful. 8/10


Full article: http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2013/05/23/the-future-of-retail-is-curation.aspx


(Image credit: Pair of shoes circle by Shutterstock)


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Alfred Hankell's curator insight, August 11, 2013 4:27 PM
Robin Good's insight:

 

 

Motley's Fool contributor Andrew Marder   has written about the critical importance that curation will have for the retail universe by citing as relevant examples Netflix and Amazon.

 

Netflix for example officially states: "...instead of trying to have everything, we should strive to have the best in each category."

 

In short, curation looks to provide customers with the best possible products instead of the most products possible.

 

"Amazon has dabbled in curation through itslists system, which allows other users to make curated lists, and through its "customers who viewed this item also viewed..." capability.

 

...

 

The success of curation is going to come from the combination of massive selection and systematized suggestion.


The model that Amazon is skirting the edges of gives consumers the ability to both drive their own choices and discover new ways to spend their money. As the algorithms that choose these recommendations become more powerful, the businesses will find higher strike rates with the suggestions.

 

My comment: Undoubtedly, a growing trend emerging for online retailers is the need to focus on selecting and curating the most relevant products, rather than all of those available, for their specific tribe. This is why those retailers capable of finding and hiring quality curators (or leveraging their users passions) to organize and showcase their product line-ups will be enjoying greater conversions and sales than those simply using algo-based selections.   

Expert advice and trusted suggestions work a lot better than any algo.

 

 

Rightful. Insightful. 8/10

 

Full article:http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2013/05/23/the-future-of-retail-is-curation.aspx

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Why Google, Yahoo and Others Are Making You Think RSS Is Dead: Lockdown

Why Google, Yahoo and Others Are Making You Think RSS Is Dead: Lockdown | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:


Marco Arment the creator of Instapaper, has an excellent and provocative piece on why Google is closing down all of its RSS appendages (they just closed also the RSS feeds in Google Alerts) and the logic behind this strategy.


He writes: "Officially, Google killed Reader because “over the years usage has declined”.1 I believe that statement, especially if API clients weren’t considered “usage”, but I don’t believe that’s the entire reason.

The most common assumption I’ve seen others cite is that “Google couldn’t figure out how to monetize Reader,” or other variants about direct profitability. I don’t believe this, either. Google Reader’s operational costs likely paled in comparison to many of their other projects that don’t bring in major revenue, and I’ve heard from multiple sources that it effectively had a staff of zero for years. It was just running, quietly serving a vital role for a lot of people."


"The bigger problem is that they’ve abandoned interoperability. RSS, semantic markup, microformats, and open APIs all enable interoperability, but the big players don’t want that — they want to lock you in, shut out competitors, and make a service so proprietary that even if you could get your data out, it would be either useless (no alternatives to import into) or cripplingly lonely (empty social networks).


Google resisted this trend admirably for a long time and was very geek- and standards-friendly, but not since Facebook got huge enough to effectively redefine the internet and refocus Google’s plans to be all-Google+, all the time.4"


Provides better perspective on RSS, Google, FB and Twitter and your future relationship with RSS.



Must-read article. 9/10


Full article: http://www.marco.org/2013/07/03/lockdown


(Image credit - RSS logo - Shutterstock)



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Ashish Rishi's curator insight, July 4, 2013 8:49 PM

Love you Marco!!!  Agreed  and couldn't have asked for more. Internet to me was the ultimate democratization tool , a leveler, a ground playing field that challenged all institutions that had unnecessary walls around them - say educational institutions , you loved them, but they were for a fortunate few. Internet platforms  ( including google) were formed for the love of internet, they have milked it enough and why not ? but now these guys are trying to become to old school walled gardens, I just hope that in doing so , they don't lose the charm that defines them.

Laura Brown's comment, July 6, 2013 11:43 AM
This is like the AOL model of the Internet which they offered years ago. People thought they were online but they were only online via AOL which mean AOL controlled what they say, how they saw it, etc. Many people were fine with the AOL version of the Internet. People who just wanted to look at email and use chat forums for personal reason and put up a personal home page, etc. However, the people who did not like being restricted or confined choose to opt out of AOL and use other ISP's (Internet Service Providers). I'm not surprised Google wants to take several steps back and go that way, take control of what people are allowed to see and make sure the ads are featured versus having the option to block them. They have already gone several steps backwards in bringing back pop up ads. No one seems to protest those, or the video and other bulky ads which take up a lot of bandwidth. People had a large voice against all that when it was still the artists, scientists and other geeks who ruled online. Now it is the marketers and the Internet reflects the change in a big way. It's like one big ad soup. Google just wants to tie it all up in a neat bundle.
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The Future of YouTube is Topic-Specific Video Channels Curated by Experts Like You

Now that there are several days worth of video content being uploaded to YouTube every minute, there is a growing necessity for there to be a curation system...
Robin Good's insight:


Tim Schmoyer of VideoCreators.tv has a short "opinion" video about YouTube and the future of video curation.


I think he is right on the mark, and what he sees coming next is exactly what will happen.


He also has a great video curation example to show.



Rightful. 7/10


Original video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pgpNSrMFjms



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Lydia Gracia's curator insight, February 3, 2013 11:58 PM

We often forget that different kind of contents exists... Run to your hangouts!

Therese Torris's curator insight, February 4, 2013 2:34 AM

Tim Schmoyer and Reelseo http://www.reelseo.com/ are good people/company to know anyway

Mattia Nicoletti's curator insight, February 4, 2013 4:00 AM

As written content curation is the new opportunity of journalism, video content curation can really open to thousands of channels. 

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Content Surplus as a Bankable Trend: Content Curation and the Future as seen by Steve Rubel

Content Surplus as a Bankable Trend: Content Curation and the Future as seen by Steve Rubel | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

In his recent business trip to Australia, Edelman’s Steve Rubel discussed his thoughts on the future of the media with Yvonne Adele at Social Media Club Melbourne.

 

Here a few highlights from the article:

 

"Content surplus as a bankable trend: In an era of self-publication (for brands as well as individuals) and increased noise we’re all faced with the problem of too much content and not enough time. For media companies, scaling this information and providing value through quality curation is a great opportunity to solve this problem for the consumer.

 

Steve’s top tips for being a quality curator:

 

a) Be knowledgeable and well read on your subject matter of choice;

 

b) Save materials for later reading – it’s all an opportunity to be well informed and provide value to others;

 

c) Focus on depth, not breadth. As Steve said, he knows a lot about a few things, and little about most things.

 

People want to connect with the human element of a brand and those that work for the organisation.

 

Journalists and media are now community managers. The have to see their role not only as a reporter/journalist/presenter – but as a brand ambassador who is able to acquire consumers and an build an audience through these channels.

 

Steve’s top three emerging trends for media?

 

1) Building business models that incorporate curation;

 

2) Increased data mining and analytics about real-time engagement with media content;

 

3) The increased importance of facebook’s open graph.

 

 

Read the full article http://j.mp/H17F45

 

Original video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lSRhDqeBtmg


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The Future of Search May Not Be About Google: It's You In The End Who Will Decide

The Future of Search May Not Be About Google: It's You In The End Who Will Decide | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
There is a evil side of Google which revealed itself in the Filter Bubble, invasion of privacy, the lack of transparency, in the monopoly induction of behavior and especially in what is happening in the search environment.
Robin Good's insight:



The future of search may not just be about Google and Bing. In the future of search, believe it or not, there are going to be a lot of people like you and me who will be providing much more helpful information guidance to specific requests than Google could ever do.


I know this sounds probably unrealistic to you, but I think there are now many good indications that this likely going to happen much sooner than you expect.


One of the key reasons why, human beings will start to reclaim this highly valuable search territory, is the fact that in the last few years we have slowly but deeply surrendered our ability to evaluate, decide and select what is "real" to Google's own algorithms, in ways that can only be detrimental to us.


You have probably read in recent times that Google is moving to use "semantic search" rather than the keyword-based approach it has been using until now. 


Do you know that "in semantic search, the decisions are not based on statistics, but rather on world models"?


"How about searching for "Dictators of the World?" The results, which include a list of famous dictators, are not just the judgment of whether someone is a dictator, but also an implicit judgment of choosing individual examples for the concept of a dictator. 


When building knowledge over concepts such as "Dictator" in the search engines, we are implicitly accepting a set of assumptions."


"It is needed to question and monitor these models, for in the past, the significance was only in the human mind. Now, it is also in the mind of the engines that forward us information. 


The search bears an editorial point of view, and its results reflect this point of view. 


We can’t ignore the assumptions behind these results. The invisible judgments will frame our conscience."


Here is a must read article by Zeh Fernandes, that wants to ignite an open discussion about "how the Google monopoly is affecting the way we search for and receive information on the internet".


I think that this is a topic deserving the highest attention and I highly recommend to read in full this excellent article, especially to content curators, information librarians and any other individual concerned with our future ability to vet, organize and make sense of the ocean of information surrounding us.


Alternative search tools and content curators are the future.



Good reminder of what we are eating daily. Insightful. Eye-opening. 10/10


Read this: http://zehfernandes.com/the-evil-side-of-google/ 








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Stephen Dale's curator insight, January 13, 2:58 AM

People who use Google are given the impression that they are interacting with the data out there, but they are actually interacting with Google and its view of the world.

 

"They are prediction engines that constantly refine a theory about who you are and what you are going to do or want next. Together, they create an universe of data for each one of us."

"In a 2010 paper published in the Scientific American journal, Tim Berners-Lee warned about companies developing ever more “closed” products and “data islands”.

"Morville, in his book Search Patterns, says that the first and second results receive 80% of attention. The vertical approach suggests to the user the idea of a single result that fully answers the question, enclosing possibilities and preventing alternative realization."


Or in other words, is our acceptance of what we see in search results eroding our ability (or willingness) to consider alternatives and employ critical thinking?

Lucy Beaton's curator insight, January 16, 5:21 PM

This is alarming.  We, as Teacher Librarians, need to be aware of the ramifications of this.

Mrs. Dilling's curator insight, February 13, 8:52 AM

My favorite statement, "we must always be aware and well informed about the intentions of companies, and never stop having multiple options for any service."

 

This article was an eye opener for me. I had never questioned Google before.

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The Future Of Content Curation Tools - Part I

The Future Of Content Curation Tools - Part I | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Content curation tools are in their infancy. Nonetheless you see so many of them around, there are more new curation tools coming your way soon, with lots of new features and options.
Robin Good's insight:



I have been testing and trying so many different content curation tools that I have been developing a good sense of what is needed most when it comes to searching, collecting, organizing and presenting information collections online.


In this two-part article I have outlined what I expect to be the most relevant changes and innovations that will be likely integrated in the content curation tools already available out there or that will become the key foundations for new ones that are yet to appear.


My article doesn't pretend to be a guide or a comprehensive catalogue of all the features that content curation tools should consider integrating, but simply an exploratory journey into some of the areas and features where I see a need for better support and where I expect to be surprised the most next.


Follow me in this short journey and add to the comments what are your personal expectations and needs on this front.


Full article: http://www.masternewmedia.org/content-curation-tools-future-part1/ 







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Josep A. Pérez Castelló's curator insight, February 14, 1:01 AM

Si os dedicáis a gestionar y organizar contenidos que después compartís en la red (content curator) este post recomendado por el profesor J. Salinas es fenomenal. Hay que leerlo.

SMOOC's curator insight, February 20, 10:27 AM

Interesting write up on content curation tools from Robin Good (pt. 1)

TeresaSiluar's curator insight, April 12, 10:34 AM

Artículo de Robin Good en el que habla de las posibilidades de las herramientas de content curation.

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From News as Reporting To News as a Gateway To Learn In Depth About a Topic

From News as Reporting To News as a Gateway To Learn In Depth About a Topic | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



It's the second time that I go back to this insightful article by Jonathan Stray, dating back to 2011, but which was visionary and rightful then as it is still now. The first time I did, right after it came out, I didn't actually realize in full how relevant and important was the idea being communicated through it.


On the surface the article talks about an hypotethical Editorial Search Engine as a desirable news app. But if you look just beyond the surface, which is by itself fascinating, in essence, Mr. Stray indicates how useful and effective it would be if news publishers moved on from reporting and into 100% curated coverage of a certain topic, issue or story, opening a fascinating discovery gateway around each story and allowing in time for these streams to intersect and interconnect with each other.


By doing this, we can not only make the news much more interesting and relevant, but we can transform them into instruments for in-depth learning about anything we are interested in.


In this light the future of news could be very much about Comprehensively Informing an Audience on a Specific Topic. And if you stop enough time to re-read it and think about it, this is a pretty powerful and revolutionary concept by itself.


He specifically writes: "Rather than (always, only) writing stories, we should be trying to solve the problem of comprehensively informing the user on a particular topic."


"Choose a topic and start with traditional reporting, content creation, in-house explainers and multimedia stories. Then integrate a story-specific search engine that gathers together absolutely everything else that can be gathered on that topic, and applies whatever niche filtering, social curation, visualization, interaction and communication techniques are most appropriate."


Jonathan Stray makes also a very inspiring connection to Jay Rosen of NYU and his idea of covering 100% of a story which in my view correctly anticipated the niche content curation trend while going beyond it in its effort to explore gateways to innovation. 

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Insightful. Visionary. Inspiring. 9/10

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Kristina Schneider's curator insight, October 26, 2013 10:36 AM

"Rather than (always, only) writing stories, we should be trying to solve the problem of comprehensively informing the user on a particular topic."

Yes! 

Michael Britt's comment, October 27, 2013 9:27 AM
I think the points above are excellent. I only wish "content consumers" if you will, agreed with this message. I say that because I have been critisized by one consumer because he didn't feel that I gave him ENOUGH content on a topic. In other words, in many content consumer's minds, A LOT OF CONTENT = VALUE. Hopefully the public is going to realize that this is not true.
Stephen Dale's curator insight, October 29, 2013 10:56 AM

A useful article on the  role of journalists by Jonathan Stray. He postulates that rather than writing stories, journalists should be trying to solve the problem of comprehensively informing the user on a particular topic, by applying filtering, social curation, visualistion and interaction with their audience. I think the professional press has woken up to this, and commend the Guardian for their insightful reporting. 

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The Five Laws of The Content Curation Economy by Steve Rosenbaum

The Five Laws of The Content Curation Economy by Steve Rosenbaum | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



Steve Rosenbaum (the author of Curation Nation) strikes some pretty powerful chords that fully resonate with my vision and expectations about the future of content curation.


On the assumption that "The speed, scale, and number of distinct elements of produced content will double every 24 months." (call it Rosenbaum law) he rightly asserts that, as if there was already enough content, we are going to be literally inundated by tons of it soon.


In this light content curation is much more than what content marketing providers would have you think (save some time and get more interesting content out). Content curation is rather a socially critical activity that will make it possible for people to learn, find the information they need and indpendently evaluate what product to buy.


Steve Rosenbaum outlines five principles around which the economy of content curation will establish itself. They are:


The First Law: People don’t want more content, they want less. 



The Second Law: Curators come in three shapes... 



The Third Law: Curation isn’t a hobby, it’s both a profession and a calling. Curators need to be paid...



The Fourth Law: Curation requires technology and tools to find, filter, and validate content...



The Fifth Law: Curation within narrow, focused, high-quality categories will emerge to compete with...



My comment: Steve Rosenbaum is right on track with this one and his five principles are 100% correct. If you are into content curation for the long ride, read them again.



Rightful. On track. 9/10


Full article: http://www.thevideoink.com/features/voices/the-coming-age-of-the-curation-economy-building-context-around-content/ 




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wanderingsalsero's curator insight, October 20, 2013 5:09 PM

Makes sense to me.

Julie Groom's curator insight, October 23, 2013 1:48 AM

Curating - how to manage it. And curation experts already exist - they're called Librarians!

John Thomas's curator insight, February 9, 9:29 AM
The Five Laws of The Content Curation Economy by Steve Rosenbaum
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Deep Design Turns Chaos Into Curation: Thomas Goetz [Video]

Thomas Goetz, Executive Editor, WIRED discusses "How to Spot the Future"."
Robin Good's insight:


Last year, at the WIRED Business Conference 2012, Thomas Goetz, a Wired executive editor, presented on an interesting topic entitled: How To Spot the Future.


In it, he presented seven rules for identifying the trends, technologies and ideas that will change the world. An activity that Wired editors should supposedly be very good at.


Rule number six in Mr. Goetz presentation is "Demand Deep Design", an elegant way of saying that "curation" and the ability to do so effectively, is and will be a characterizing trait of companies capable of changing the world.


"Stripping away unnecessary info..."

"companies that help us organize our lives..."

"entities that help us understand information"


All these are all easily recognizable traits of those working, directly or indirectly, to help us better manage the large amount of information we are increasingly confronted with.


The ability to do so, is a "design ability", because it encompasses the whole purpose, reason to be and scope of an object, piece of information or tool.


And indeed, it looks like but inevitable (unavoidable), that those individuals and companies who will devise new and better ways to help us manage the info tsunami, will have a fast growing demand coming their way.


"Deep Design turns chaos into curation."


Specific video segment starts at: 8':04"

duration: 1':47"

or go to:

Video URL (specific segment)  : http://fora.tv/2012/05/01/WIRED_Business_Conference_How_to_Spot_the_Future#chapter_08


Download full original video .MP4: http://fora.tv/download?cid=15486&fid=110671&sid=ZeRp3KhvVSYluF0TR1u%2BUeQFrBGtHE6yVaA%2Ff8a1kIc%3D&api=11934220-3fda-11e2-a25f-0800200c9a66

(Duration: 12 min - File size: 49MB)



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siobhan-o-flynn's curator insight, July 5, 2013 5:42 AM

Grazie to Robin Good for the excellent summary as always!

 

Robin Good's insight:

 

"Last year, at the WIRED Business Conference 2012, Thomas Goetz, a Wired executive editor, presented on an interesting topic entitled: How To Spot the Future.

 

In it, he presented seven rules for identifying the trends, technologies and ideas that will change the world. An activity that Wired editors should supposedly be very good at.

 

Rule number six in Mr. Goetz presentation is "Demand Deep Design", an elegant way of saying that "curation" and the ability to do so effectively, is and will be a characterizing trait of companies capable of changing the world.

 

"Stripping away unnecessary info..."

"companies that help us organize our lives..."

"entities that help us understand information"..."

 
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The Future of Learning Is All About Curation and Search



Robin Good's insight:



If you are curious to know what I think about curation and search and their future, check out this 3-minute audio excerpt from a much longer interview about curating your experience I had with Joel Zasflosky of ValueofSimple.

In it I highlight how inadequate is to expect Google results to fulfill the need that many people have to learn and deepen their knowledge about a topic they are not familiar with.

Google set of very specific, highly filtered and ranked text results represent many, often relevant, individual bites of a larger puzzle that is never shown.

You are provided tons of individual trees in place of the "forest" you have asked about.

That is the greatest limitation for Google… when it comes the need, not to find a specific book, product, event or person, but for learning, understanding, for seeing the bigger picture, then the individual bites, ranked by Google authority or Pagerank, just don't serve our need.

This is why, just like we can't feed our appetites only with Big Macs, when it comes to learning about a topic we're not familiar with, we will increasingly rely on curated search engines, trusted guides and portals who can provide us with a much better and more useful roadmap into learning than Google can.


Audio excerpt: https://soundcloud.com/user458849/curation-and-search-joel


Full interview: http://valueofsimple.com/smart-and-simple-matters-podcast-023-with-robin-good/ 


MP3 full interview: http://traffic.libsyn.com/valueofsimple/023_SmartAndSimpleMattersPodcastFromValueOfSimple.mp3


Subscribe to iTunes podcast: http://valueofsimple.com/itunes







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Content Curation for Education and Learning: Robin Good @Emerge2012 Presentation-Map

Content Curation for Education and Learning: Robin Good @Emerge2012 Presentation-Map | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Robin Good: I believe that content curation will play a very important role in the future of education and learning and this presentation-map focuses on this topic.

I have identified at least ten reasons that are transforming and weakening the education-certification system as it is now, and may rapidly give way to new ways of teaching, learning and getting certified which will likely involve a great deal of curation (both for those who teach/guide and those who want to learn).


In this presentation-map I am introducing the concept of curation for education, the key factors that I see are transforming traditional academic institutions and the learning industry in general, and the tools, resources and examples that are relevant to those working in these fields and wanting to find out more.


As part of my workshop session during the emerge2012 conference in which I have first presented these ideas, I have also created an "open", collaborative wiki-map where, you are welcome to contribute inspiring curated collections. You will find instructions on how to contribute to it at the end of this presentation.

Full presentation-map: http://www.mindomo.com/mindmap/content-curation-for-education-and-learning-robin-good-emerge2012-98ccaad217074a07b9bff8b76effab8e


"What is content curation in the context of education and why it is going to be so relevant in the near future. Benefits of content curation, examples and tools."


Emerge2012 Conference



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