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Content Curation World
What a Content Curator Needs To Know: How, Tools, Issues and Strategy
Curated by Robin Good
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Why I Don't Like Scoopit Links on Twitter

Why I Don't Like Scoopit Links on Twitter | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

I’m seeing more Scoopit links in my Twitter stream and I’m not crazy about it.  Sure it’s quick and easy to share with Scoopit.  But it not quick and easy to consume. For me it's all about the econ...

Marty Note (here is comment I wrote on Dr. V's blog)

Appreciate Bryan’s and Joseph’s comment, but I rarely use Scoop.it as a pass through. More than 90% of the time I’m adding “rich snippets” to content I Scoop.

Rich snippets are “blog” posts that fall between Twitter and the 500 to 1,000 words I would write in Scenttrail Marketing. I often create original content ON Scoop.it because whatever I’m writing falls in the crack between Twitter’s micro blog and what I think of as needing to be on my marketing blog.


I was taught NOT to pass through links on Scoop.it early on by the great curator @Robin Good . Robin has well over 1M views on Scoop.it now and his advice along with the patient advice of other great Scoop.it curators has my profile slouching toward 150,000 views.


Bryan is correct that some curators new to Scoop.it haven’t learned the Robin Good lesson yet. I agree it is frustrating to go to a link and not receive anything of value back, to simply need to click on another link. Curators who pass through links won’t scale, so the Darwinian impact will be they will learn to add value or die out.


For my part I always identify my Scoop.it links, probably about half the content I Tweet and about a quarter of my G+ shares. I also routinely share my favorite “Scoopiteers”, great content curators who taught me valuable lessons such as don’t simply pass through links but add “micro blogging” value via rich snippets.


When you follow or consistently share content from a great curator on Scooop.it you begin to understand HOW they shape the subjects they curate. I know, for example, Robin Good is amazing on new tools. Scoop.it anticipated this learning and built in a feature where I can suggest something to Robin.


This is when Scoop.it is at its most crowdsourcing best because I now have an army of curators who know I like to comment on and share content about design or BI or startups and they (other Scoopiteers) keep an eye out for me. There are several reasons Scoop.it is a “get more with less effort” tool and this crowdsourcing my curation is high on the list.


So, sorry you are sad to see Scoop.it links and understand your frustration. You’ve correctly identified the problem too – some curators don’t know how to use the tool yet. I know it is a lot to ask to wait for the Darwinian learning that will take place over generations, but Scoop.it and the web have “generations” that have the half life of a gnat so trust that the richness of the Scoop.it community will win in the end and “the end” won’t take long.


To my fellow Scoop.it curators we owe Bryan and Joseph thanks for reminding us of what Robin Good taught me – add value or your Scoop.it won’t scale. That lessons is applicable to much more than how we use Scoop.it.


Marty

Added to G+ too
https://plus.google.com/102639884404823294558/posts/TUsNtsAsjWp

 


Via Martin (Marty) Smith
Robin Good's insight:

Well, I can't really agree more with Marty's point.

On the other hand Scoop.it, and a number of similar platforms,  are heavily promoted as a content marketing platforms that promise to a) save you time and b) allow you to post more content.

And then, unless you heavily moderate and surface editorial models that can guide other users, you tend to level down to the lowest common denominator. 

This is what I see happening and I regret it as well.

Thanks Marty for highlighting it. 

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Peg Corwin's comment, March 10, 3:54 PM
Further to Therese Torris' comment, might we ask Scoop.it for a setting that allows us to choose to automatically tweet the post author when we re-scoop? It takes many clicks back and forth to get and add it.
Martin (Marty) Smith's comment, March 10, 4:06 PM
Yes @Peg Corwin I see your "filtering" much like @Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com work as providing value. As Brian shared he discard much more content than he is sharing. I think this builds on Robin's idea of "value" and its meaningful, fast and valuable to those who understand that filtering is the primary activity. I don't think its hard to know this since the second time a customer follows a link of yours or Brian's they know they are following your curation suggestion. On Sunday I thought "pass through" was an unsustainable model. After a day of #startup school I am not so sure. You and Brian are building a themed castle one brick (one share) at a time as surely as I am or anyone else using Scoop.it. Today it feels like a defined link share as you and Brian have described is a valuable service. <br><br>You've hit the primary value AND I often cut the middle man out (something it isn't hard to do ust use Google to search the title). Bryan (Dr V) was complaining about the extra click and that is why I sometimes jump past the pass through too, but since that jump isn't difficult and the oeuvre you create has merit as a whole I think we are simply approach the same problem with a slightly different approach (pass through vs. value add). I think you and Brian are SAVING TIME since you evaluate mor content than you share. <br><br>Despite Dr. V's complaint about seeing Scoop.it links I think that is an important signal and a signals that connects the IDEA of your curation as a whole, so I would say when you drive to Scoop.it using a Scoop.it moniker is a good idea. M
Peg Corwin's comment, March 11, 6:19 AM
Thanks Marty. I think indexing a topic like this adds value in a different way to the curation. http://website.pegcorwin.com/p/4010710384/2013/11/09/popular-topics
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Content Curation Tools: The Hearsay Social Content Exchange

Robin Good: If you are a company looking for quality content from prestigious and reliable news sources, from which you can pick and choose which stories to publish on your web site, Hearsay may be the solution you are looking for.


Hearsay Social Content Exchange aggregates content from Thomson Reuters, Tribune Media Services and Demand Media.

This new content curation platform makes it quite easy for marketers and sales people to discover engaging third-party and custom content feeds.


In fact, in addition to premium third-party content, Hearsay Social customers can create and integrate custom news channels on the platform such as your company blog, a YouTube channel, or a custom RSS feed tailored to the interests of your organization.


From these they can pick and select their preferred content and share it directly to multiple social media networks such as LinkedIN, Facebook, Twitter and Google+.


Check out this review of Hearsay: http://www.marketingtechblog.com/hearsay-content-exchange/


Schedule a demo: https://info.hearsaysocial.com/ContentExchange_LearnMore.html


More info: http://hearsaysocial.com/product/content-exchange/



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How To Effectively Combine Curation With Your Content Strategy

How To Effectively Combine Curation With Your Content Strategy | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Margot Bloomstein, a content strategist talks about how to combine curation to your content strategy by showcasing lessons she has adopted from museum curators and so much more.

 

What caught my attention:

 

**She talks about copywriting issues. Because a curator goes way beyond aggregating which is just gathering content, they arrange it in order of relevance, point out what you should pay attention to and many other important things.  It takes a lot of thought to assemble pieces in a cohesive manner, add context to it, ad take it to the next level. 

 

**It is appropiate to give the curator credit if you're going to repost or use it in any manner.

 

http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2011/09/15/margot-bloomstein-combining-curation-with-your-content-strategy/

 

 


Via janlgordon
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Tom George's comment, March 20, 2012 6:19 AM
Hey Pedro,
I am the founder of Internet Billboards, my name is Tom George. Do you think you will be curated more on this topic and building a nice Scoop.it page? The reason I ask is I can show you how you can auto share your Scoop.it selections to Internet Billboards.
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Content Curation Is the New Community Builder

Content Curation Is the New Community Builder | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Great post written by Eric Brown for Social Media Explorer - This is what caught my attention:

 

Curation — the act of human editors adding their work to the machines that gather, organize and filter content.

 

“Curation comes up when search stops working,” says author and NYU Professor Clay Shirky. But it’s more than a human-powered filter.

 

“Curation comes up when people realize that it isn’t just about information seeking, it’s also about synchronizing a community.”

 

Part of the reason that human curation is so critical is simply the vast number of people who are now making and sharing media.

 

“Everyone is a media outlet”, says Shirky. “The point of everyone being a media outlet is really not at all complicated. It just means that we can all put things out in the public view.


Via janlgordon
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A Curated Visual Collection of Industry Landscapes: Lumascapes

A Curated Visual Collection of Industry Landscapes: Lumascapes | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:


LumaPartners, an investment bank that provides strategic advice to digital media companies, has created over time a wonderful and quite useful collection of industry landscapes that cover specific sectors such as Search, Video, Mobile and Marketing Technologies.


Each map aggregates, organizes and groups the most relevant players in a specific industry sector at a certain point in time.


An excellent example of how curating and organizing a large number of resources in a specific field can provide a useful reference sought and appreciated by many.


Free to access.


All collections: http://www.lumapartners.com/resource-center/lumascapes-2/ 



Specific maps worth checking out:


.



 

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pascal leclerc's curator insight, February 5, 10:31 PM

Voici une collection de cartes intéressantes sur l'écosystème de plusieurs secteurs d'activité autour du numérique !

Nicoletta Gay's curator insight, February 6, 2:56 AM

A visual collection of the increasingly overlapping key sectors of digital media: DISPLAY, SEARCH, VIDEO, MOBILE, SOCIAL, COMMERCE, and GAMING.

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The Demise of Quality Content on the Web - The Rise of Great Content Curators

The Demise of Quality Content on the Web - The Rise of Great Content Curators | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

This a great blog post from Rian van der Merwe , describing the noise you can find on the web now, and especially content just created for SEO purposes or advertisers. As many, Rian is tired of it.

 

Rian speaks for many of us who are overwhelmed, overloaded with content that gives us no value at all. This is the problem

 

"I used to believe that if you write with passion and clarity about a topic you know well (or want to know more about), you will find and build an audience. I believed that maybe, if you’re smart about it, you could find a way for some part of that audience to pay you money to sustain whatever obsession drove you to self-publishing"'

 

Here's what caught my attention:

 

****The wells of attention are being drilled to depletion by linkbait headlines, ad-infested pages, “jumps” and random pagination, and content that is engineered to be “consumed” in 1 minute or less of quick scanning – just enough time to capture those almighty eyeballs[2]. And the reality is that “Alternative Attention sources” simply don’t exist.

 

The Scoopit team agrees!

 

My input:

 

****The Opportunity: This is the time for all good curators to come forward - 2012 will be the year of the content curator -

 

**Know your audience

**Know their pain points

**Find and select the best content, add your own opinions, information or anything that will provide more value for your audience

**Select only the best content, don't just aggregate links that add to the noise

**Become a trusted resource - many opportunities will come to you, it's your time to shine

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/tF0opI]

 


Via axelletess, janlgordon
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Karen Dietz's comment, December 4, 2011 9:23 AM
Great post and comments Jan! Looking forward to 2012.
janlgordon's comment, December 4, 2011 11:59 AM
@Karen Dietz

Thanks Karen! 2012 is going to be an amazing year for all of us!!
Gust MEES's curator insight, February 14, 2013 4:39 AM

Quality Matters!

A MUST read!!!

Check also:

http://www.scoop.it/webwizard

http://www.scoop.it/t/the-scoop-it-spotlight

http://blog.scoop.it/en/2011/11/30/lord-of-curation-series-gust-mees/

 

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Content Curation:Tips, Tactics, Tools & Techniques You Need To Know

Content Curation:Tips, Tactics, Tools & Techniques You Need To Know | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

For this month's Net2 Think Tank, we asked you to share your tips, resources, and ideas about curating content at your organization or enterprise. Below, read the curated list of the community responses we received - and share your own tips in the comments!

 

Topic: What are your best practices for curating content? Share your tips, tactics, tools, and techniques for effectively curating to serve your audience. And, if you've written about curation in the past, share the link with us!

 

Here's a quick working definition to get us started: Content curation focuses on using the web to highlight important information in situations where information overload may be a problem. Many organizations today are writing on the web regularly to communicate with their audience. At the same time, information pollution is an increasing problem for the consumers of that content. As Will Coley explains, "when organizations offer clarity amidst the noise, they build trust among supporters"

 

http://netsquared.org/blog/claire-sale/september-net2-think-tank-round-curating


Via janlgordon
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