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What a Content Curator Needs To Know: How, Tools, Issues and Strategy
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Content Curation and Preservation: How To Archive Digital Documents Reliably

Content Curation and Preservation: How To Archive Digital Documents Reliably | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



John Bell, web developer, PhD student and lecturer at the University of Maine has published a useful cheat sheet synthesizing the best file formats to work with, provide access to, and to permanently archive digital artworks. 


The visual guide provides archival file format references for text, audio, video and image contents as well as suggestions for ideal formats to use also for both working and for providing accessing to such digital contents.


Useful. Handy. Informative. 8/10



Original article: http://www.hastac.org/blogs/belljo/2013/10/28/digital-documentation-art-workshop-and-fighting-bit-rot 


Cheat Sheet (PDF): http://novomancy.org/john/digital_archiving_cheat_sheet_mica.pdf 






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ghbrett's curator insight, October 29, 2013 5:08 PM

Be sure to check out Robin Good's comments below.

Darryl Barnaby's curator insight, October 30, 2013 6:05 AM

Guidance on how to best preserve media.

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, November 2, 2013 5:38 PM

Interesting post about archieving digital documents in a realiable way

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Permanent Archival of Author Content Soon Possible Thanks To Harvard Perma.cc

Permanent Archival of Author Content Soon Possible Thanks To Harvard Perma.cc | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Broken links are everywhere. Perma helps authors and journals create permanent links for citations in their published work.
Robin Good's insight:



Perma.cc is an upcoming web service that aims to help authors and journals create permanent archival copies of their online published content.


Way too often in fact, due to a multitude of reasons, not only content gets moved and relocated to new sites, becoming more difficult to find but in many others it is permanently deleted or lost.


To comfort your doubts that this is a true and tangible issue, you should check the work being carried out by Kendra AlbertLarry Lessig and Jonathan Zittrain, who are completing a study of link rot, available at http://papers.ssrn.com/abstract=2329161


Link rot is the phenomenon by which material we link to on the distributed Web vanishes or changes beyond recognition over time.


Believe it or not half of the links in all of the Supreme Court opinions, don't work anymore.


In this context "the Harvard Library Innovation Lab has pioneered a project to unite libraries so that link rot can be mitigated.  We are joined by about thirty law libraries around the world to start Perma.cc, which will allow those libraries on direction of authors and journal editors to store permanent caches of otherwise ephemeral links."


The Internet Archive has provided its powerful archiving engine to support this effort and Cloudfare its distributed CDN.


The official tagline of the upcoming site reads: "perma.cc helps authors and journals create permanent archived citations in their published work"


Here is essence what you should expect from it: "Perma.cc allows users to create citation links that will never break.


When a user creates a Perma.cc link, Perma.cc archives a copy of the referenced content, and generates a link to an unalterable hosted instance of the site.


Regardless of what may happen to the original source, if the link is later published by a journal using the Perma.cc service, the archived version will always be available through the Perma.cc link."


N.B.: While anyone will be able to go to Perma.cc and archive any web page this resource is designed for researchers, authors and journals. In this light Perma.cc downloads the material at the designated URL and provides a new URL (a “Perma.cc link”) that can then be inserted in a paper. 


After the paper has been submitted to a journal, the journal staff checks that the provided Perma.cc link actually represents the cited material. If it does, the staff “vests” the link and it is forever preserved. Links that are not “vested” will be preserved for two years, at which point the author will have the option to renew the link for another two years.



My comment: Can't wait to test it. We need these type of archival tools like oxygen. It's not only important that we organize and curate what is important from the web, but it is essential that we also take care in preserving it for the longest possible time.




Free and open to all (soon).


Request beta access here: http://perma.cc/ 


More info: http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/futureoftheinternet/2013/09/22/perma/ 



Similar Tools: www.Permamarks.com  



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Blaithan Michael Altenburg's curator insight, September 24, 2013 12:11 PM

This is good that they are helping

Alfred Hankell's curator insight, September 25, 2013 7:33 AM
Robin Good's insight:

 

 

 

Perma.cc is an upcoming web service that aims to help authors and journals create permanent archival copies of their online published content.

 

Way too often in fact, due to a multitude of reasons, not only content gets moved and relocated to new sites, becoming more difficult to find but in many others it is permanently deleted or lost.

 

To comfort your doubts that this is a true and tangible issue, you should check the work being carried out by Kendra Albert, Larry Lessig and Jonathan Zittrain, who are completing a study of link rot, available at http://papers.ssrn.com/abstract=2329161. ;

 

Link rot is the phenomenon by which material we link to on the distributed Web vanishes or changes beyond recognition over time.

 

Believe it or not half of the links in all of the Supreme Court opinions, don't work anymore.

 

In this context "the Harvard Library Innovation Lab has pioneered a project to unite libraries so that link rot can be mitigated.  We are joined by about thirty law libraries around the world to start Perma.cc, which will allow those libraries on direction of authors and journal editors to store permanent caches of otherwise ephemeral links."

 

The Internet Archive has provided its powerful archiving engine to support this effort and Cloudfare its distributed CDN.

 

The official tagline of the upcoming site reads: "perma.cc helps authors and journals create permanent archived citations in their published work"

 

Here is essence what you should expect from it: "Perma.cc allows users to create citation links that will never break.


When a user creates a Perma.cc link, Perma.cc archives a copy of the referenced content, and generates a link to an unalterable hosted instance of the site.


Regardless of what may happen to the original source, if the link is later published by a journal using the Perma.cc service, the archived version will always be available through the Perma.cc link."

 

N.B.: While anyone will be able to go to Perma.cc and archive any web page this resource is designed for researchers, authors and journals. In this light Perma.cc downloads the material at the designated URL and provides a new URL (a “Perma.cc link”) that can then be inserted in a paper. 


After the paper has been submitted to a journal, the journal staff checks that the provided Perma.cc link actually represents the cited material. If it does, the staff “vests” the link and it is forever preserved. Links that are not “vested” will be preserved for two years, at which point the author will have the option to renew the link for another two years.

 

 

My comment: Can't wait to test it. We need these type of archival tools like oxygen. It's not only important that we organize and curate what is important from the web, but it is essential that we also take care in preserving it for the longest possible time.

 

 

 

Free and open to all (soon).

 

Request beta access here: http://perma.cc/ ;

 

More info: http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/futureoftheinternet/2013/09/22/perma/ ;

 

 

Similar Tools: www.Permamarks.com

Steve Tuffill's curator insight, September 25, 2013 8:47 AM

Essential, if the Internet is our all-time library resource...

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Preservation: Make a Permanent Archive Copy of Any Webpage with Mummify.it

Preservation: Make a Permanent Archive Copy of Any Webpage with Mummify.it | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



After Permamarks and Perma.cc have made their recent debut, there is a new free web service offering the ability to store, preserve and index any web page.


Mummify.it it's very simple to use. You can either paste the URL of a web page that you want to be preserved or you can install the Mummify bookmarklet and click on it anytime you are on a web page that you want to archive forever "as is".


Mummify creates a "permanent", in the cloud, non-movable and supposedly non-changeable link to the archived version of your selected page. (I say supposedly because of course no-one can really guarantee for the future of this company yet.)


From then on you can share directly the mummified URL (or a shortened version of it), as, until the "original" is live and accessible online, it will point directly to it. Only if the "original" goes down, the mummified URL will re-direct automatically to the "preserved" copy.


A free version allows you to archive up to 10 pages per month. The $10/mo plan allows for 25 and the $15/mo plan provides also analytics and alerts for when the "original" of any archived page goes down.


My comment: Mummify represents an unstoppable and useful trend inherited by curation disciplines that have a much longer history than "content curation": preservation. Mummify.it, like its two predecessors is a useful tool, that will become even more appreciated when fully integrated (as Buffer does) into any professional content curation tool. 


Free for most.



Try it out now: https://www.mummify.it 


(Image credit: Golden birdwing by Shutterstock)




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Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, October 15, 2013 12:30 AM

Sometimes you need an archive of a site. Gret for slow bandwidth areas when you just want to show an aspect of a site. Here is how.

Stephen Dale's curator insight, October 15, 2013 4:30 AM

A useful addition to the digital curator's toolkit.

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, November 3, 2013 6:24 AM

When you Mummify a webpage—a news article, blog post, photo or tweet, for example— we make a permanent copy and back it up in the cloud. We then give you a new URL that looks like this: http://mummify.it/2452862


Mummify is free up to 100 mummies a month. If you need to Mummify more than 100 pages in a given month you can purchase 50 more for $5.
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Data Curation as Digital Preservation of Documents and Electronic Artifacts: Key Reference Resources

Data Curation as Digital Preservation of Documents and Electronic Artifacts: Key Reference Resources | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Data (or Digital) Curation, is an academic/scientific discipline dedicated to preserve, organize and collect digital documents and other electronic artifacts for archival, re-use and repurposing objectives.


Check: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_curation and

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_curation


The importance of Data Curation can be easily underestimated as it may appear, to the casual viewer, as an arid, tedious document archival job.


In reality, Digital Curation efforts are of great value to the preservation of important cultural documents and data for future researchers who will want to access, in some organized way, the data-information-artifacts of our time. In addition, the data curation practices and guidelines developed by academic and research institutions can also be of value and inspiration to other types of curation work, that may adopt, emulate or innovate upon them.

If you are interested in learning more about Data/Digital Curation and in identifying the key organizations in this space, here is a good shortlist for you, thanks to the kind work of Kevin "the Librarian" Read:




Useful. 7/10


Source: http://kevinthelibrarian.wordpress.com/2012/07/20/an-introduction-to-the-data-curation-lifecycle-model-where-do-librarians-fit-in/




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