Content Curation World
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Content Curation World
What a Content Curator Needs To Know: How, Tools, Issues and Strategy
Curated by Robin Good
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Search Engines Will Increasingly Be Gateways To Curators & Collections Rather Than To Individual Tracks

Search Engines Will Increasingly Be Gateways To Curators & Collections Rather Than To Individual Tracks | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



Justin Fowler, co-founder of AudioPress, offers valuable insight into what the future of search and curation may be, by providing a relevant and sound pattern to look at: music.


He writes on TheNextWeb:

"Context is key for music, and that is where services like Songza and Beats Music are picking up tips from FM radio. These services are essentially using algorithms to help people discover new playlists, instead of discovering new songs. This allows for a marriage of both technology and human curation."


Accordingly, as time goes by, I expect to see search engines increasingly highlight and direct searchers to quality curators, hubs and on-topic collections and specialized resources, rather than to individual, one-topic-only pages.


Search engines will increasingly be gateways to curators and content collections rather than to individual tracks and pages.


This will be particularly true especially when you will query a topic, a theme or interest, or better yet, a musical genre.

In all of these situations, where you want to dive, discover and learn more about a topic, it is much better to be offered a selection of playlists, compilations, collections or hubs covering that theme rather than a specific song, product or artist.

That is, search and discoverability of content will rely more and more on intermediaries that will take on the load to make sense and organize in the best possible way, a specific realm of information (it can be a music genre, or the analysis of a biological topic) rather than  - as it happens today - provide a linear list of individual web pages that is supposed to cover that topic.


If the music industry, is, like other times before, an early indicator of how things will work out in the future, it makes a lot of sense to expect that the future of content discovery and search will be increasingly in the hands of curators, greatly helped and supported by sophisticated, but hackable and adjustable algorithms.


What do you think?



Rightful. Indicative of things to come. 8/10


Full article: http://trove.com/me/content/Cc1qT


Reading time: 4':20"










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Social Curation with Twitter: a Research Study by NTT

Robin Good's insight:



From the paper abstract:  "Social media such as microblogs have become so pervasive such that it is now possible to use them as sensors for real-world events and memes.


While much recent research has focused on developing automatic methods for filtering and summarizing these data streams, we explore a different trend called social curation.


In contrast to automatic methods, social curation is characterized as a human-in-the-loop and sometimes crowd-sourced mechanism for exploiting social media as sensors."


The paper attempts to analyze curated microblog data and to understand the main reasons why people "participate in this laborious curation process".


It also looks at "new ways in which information retrieval and machine learning technologies can be used to assist curators" and it also suggests "a novel method based on a learning-to-rank framework that increases the curator's productivity and breadth of perspective by suggests which novel microblogs should be added to the curated content."


The paper contains valuable information for anyone interested in having more statistical data about social curation activities and patterns on Twitter, the use of lists and the typical reasons why individuals want to do this. 



Interesting. 7/10


Full original PDF paper:  http://cl.naist.jp/~kevinduh/papers/duh12curation-long.pdf 





 


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Why Crowdsourcing Future Is Moving To Curation, Synthesis and Things

Why Crowdsourcing Future Is Moving To Curation, Synthesis and Things | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



Gaurav Mishra does an excellent job in explaining and illustrating in greater depth the concepts and ideas introduced in his presentation: Future of Crowdsourcing: Creation to Curation, Search to Synthesis, Content to Things.


The key axiom in the article is that crowdsourcing is slowly shifting: 

a) in terms of input: from creation to curation,

b) in terms of output: from search to synthesis, and

c) in terms of focus: from content to things.


For example when it comes to input, we are moving from crowdsourcing platforms that helped us to create logos or simple graphic designs to new services that will actually curate for us the best design candidates to take into consideration.


A great enlightnening example of this shift, can be seen by looking at one of the many excellent resources listed in this article: ImageBrief, an online service which connects creatives with photographers, who themselves handpick images from their hard disks to match the criteria listed in the submitted creative briefs. 


My comment: Gaurav comprehensive vision and ability to spot relevant shifts and trends is not only uncanny, but also systematic. No matter which article or presentation you look at in his collection you can be sure to find something always of value. 


Excellent. Insightful. Resourceful. 9/10


Full article: http://gauravonomics.com/future-crowdsourcing-trends/ 





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María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, November 16, 2013 8:13 AM

Great one.

Olinda Turner's curator insight, November 20, 2013 5:57 PM

Although directed at content marketing, these ideas translate into technical communications where users are trying to help each other find the best technical content. I totally agree that the fundamental way in which we communicate through content is shifting.

irene's curator insight, January 10, 2014 9:16 AM

Perché il futuro del Crowdsourcing va in direzione della cura, sintesi e cose varie.

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Guiding Customers To The Best Possible Products: That's What Retail Curation Is All About

Guiding Customers To The Best Possible Products: That's What Retail Curation Is All About | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

"The Motley Fool - As choice becomes overwhelming, the winners of the future retail war will be the ones who can help guide customers to the perfect products."

Robin Good's insight:



Motley's Fool contributor Andrew Marder   has written about the critical importance that curation will have for the retail universe by citing as relevant examples Netflix and Amazon.


Netflix for example officially states: "...instead of trying to have everything, we should strive to have the best in each category."


In short, curation looks to provide customers with the best possible products instead of the most products possible.


"Amazon has dabbled in curation through its lists system, which allows other users to make curated lists, and through its "customers who viewed this item also viewed..." capability.


...


The success of curation is going to come from the combination of massive selection and systematized suggestion.


The model that Amazon is skirting the edges of gives consumers the ability to both drive their own choices and discover new ways to spend their money. As the algorithms that choose these recommendations become more powerful, the businesses will find higher strike rates with the suggestions.


My comment: Undoubtedly, a growing trend emerging for online retailers is the need to focus on selecting and curating the most relevant products, rather than all of those available, for their specific tribe. This is why those retailers capable of finding and hiring quality curators (or leveraging their users passions) to organize and showcase their product line-ups will be enjoying greater conversions and sales than those simply using algo-based selections.  

Expert advice and trusted suggestions work a lot better than any algo.



Rightful. Insightful. 8/10


Full article: http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2013/05/23/the-future-of-retail-is-curation.aspx


(Image credit: Pair of shoes circle by Shutterstock)


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Prof. Hankell's curator insight, August 11, 2013 7:27 PM
Robin Good's insight:

 

 

Motley's Fool contributor Andrew Marder   has written about the critical importance that curation will have for the retail universe by citing as relevant examples Netflix and Amazon.

 

Netflix for example officially states: "...instead of trying to have everything, we should strive to have the best in each category."

 

In short, curation looks to provide customers with the best possible products instead of the most products possible.

 

"Amazon has dabbled in curation through itslists system, which allows other users to make curated lists, and through its "customers who viewed this item also viewed..." capability.

 

...

 

The success of curation is going to come from the combination of massive selection and systematized suggestion.


The model that Amazon is skirting the edges of gives consumers the ability to both drive their own choices and discover new ways to spend their money. As the algorithms that choose these recommendations become more powerful, the businesses will find higher strike rates with the suggestions.

 

My comment: Undoubtedly, a growing trend emerging for online retailers is the need to focus on selecting and curating the most relevant products, rather than all of those available, for their specific tribe. This is why those retailers capable of finding and hiring quality curators (or leveraging their users passions) to organize and showcase their product line-ups will be enjoying greater conversions and sales than those simply using algo-based selections.   

Expert advice and trusted suggestions work a lot better than any algo.

 

 

Rightful. Insightful. 8/10

 

Full article:http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2013/05/23/the-future-of-retail-is-curation.aspx

Phyllis Shapiro's curator insight, July 13, 2014 8:02 PM

Here it is!

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An Inside Look At News Curation Apps from the RJI Futures Lab

Robin Good's insight:



This short but quite interesting video update looks at emerging news curation apps designed to gather and select the most relevant news for their users. 

Circa's David Cohn, Inside's Jason Calacanis and Newsy's Jim Spencer provide key insight into what their news discovery services are offering and how they use curation to achieve this result.  


The video covers also the value of curation over original journalism and issues of copyright and fair use.


Interesting. Informative. 7/10


Original video: http://youtu.be/Gf3SYrt2Jgw 



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Bob Boynton's comment, March 31, 2014 12:51 AM
I cannot use my scoop.it because I am following you and I do not have adobe flash installed, and I do not want adobe flash installed. But the video will not let me access my scoop.it.
socialcompany's curator insight, May 23, 2014 9:04 AM

stories behind circa, inside, newsy, good short videos.

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Collaborative Curation and Personalization The Future of Museums: A Study Report

Collaborative Curation and Personalization  The Future of Museums: A Study Report | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

This report highlights a number of key trends that will have a significant impact on the user experience and design of future collections and museums.

Robin Good's insight:



Picture these scenarios:
 

  • The Victoria & Albert Museum, its collections depleted by massive repatriation, becomes a travel & tourism guide and international affairs ambassador in an increasingly globalized community
     
  • The Freud Museum, in the spirit of its namesake, becomes a provider of mental retreat and therapy (I wonder if the docents will be licensed psychoanalysis?)

These, according to the 40-page report Museums in a Digital Age” from Arups, may actually be some of the likely new profiles of prestigious museums 25 years from now.  


The report projects that:


"...future museums will see personalised content, new levels of sustainability and a visitor experience extended beyond present expectations of time and space."


  • A rising desire among audiences to shape their own cultural experiences (“Collaborative Curation”)
     
  • The opportunity for museum to become “curators of experiences” that extend beyond the boundaries of traditional exhibits or programs, or beyond the walls of the museum itself.


Source: http://futureofmuseums.blogspot.it/2013/11/museums-in-future-view-from-across-pond.html 

 
The idea of "collaborative curation" of museum collections by the actual users-visitors, is particularly fascinating. 

"Just as current consumer trends shift towards collaborative consumption, in the future, museums may employ new patterns of collaborative curation, allowing for individually curated experiences and giving the public greater control over both content and experience.

Increased visitor participation will allow people themselves to reinvent the museum experience, enabling content that can adapt to the preferences of users in real-time."


My comment: If you are a curator and are interested in exploring and understanding what the future of large collections and museums may look like and which forces are going to be driving such changes, this is a good report to read.


Insightful. Inspiring 8/10



Original Report: Museums in the Digital Age: 
http://www.arup.com/Publications/Museums_in_the_Digital_Age.aspx 


PDF: http://www.arup.com/~/media/Files/PDF/Publications/Research_and_whitepapers/2013_Arup_FRI_MuseumsintheDigitalAge_final_web.ashx 




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Jennifer Ryan's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:04 PM

This is right up my alley. Looking forward to reading about trends and impacts.

Erica Bilder's curator insight, November 15, 2013 7:11 AM

I have nothing to add to Robin Good's terrific insights:

 Robin Good's insight:

 

 

Picture these scenarios:
 

The Victoria & Albert Museum, its collections depleted by massive repatriation, becomes a travel & tourism guide and international affairs ambassador in an increasingly globalized community
 The Freud Museum, in the spirit of its namesake, becomes a provider of mental retreat and therapy (I wonder if the docents will be licensed psychoanalysis?)

These, according to the 40-page report “Museums in a Digital Age” from Arups, may actually be some of the likely new profiles of prestigious museums 25 years from now.  

 

The report projects that:

 

"...future museums will see personalised content, new levels of sustainability and a visitor experience extended beyond present expectations of time and space."

 

A rising desire among audiences to shape their own cultural experiences (“Collaborative Curation”)
 The opportunity for museum to become “curators of experiences” that extend beyond the boundaries of traditional exhibits or programs, or beyond the walls of the museum itself.

 

Source: http://futureofmuseums.blogspot.it/2013/11/museums-in-future-view-from-across-pond.html ;

 The idea of "collaborative curation" of museum collections by the actual users-visitors, is particularly fascinating.  "Just as current consumer trends shift towards collaborative consumption, in the future, museums may employ new patterns of collaborative curation,allowing for individually curated experiences and giving the public greater control over both content and experience.
Increased visitor participation will allow people themselves to reinvent the museum experience, enabling content that can adapt to the preferences of users in real-time." 

 

My comment: If you are a curator and are interested in exploring and understanding what the future of large collections and museums may look like and which forces are going to be driving such changes, this is a good report to read.

 

Insightful. Inspiring 8/10



Original Report: Museums in the Digital Age: 
http://www.arup.com/Publications/Museums_in_the_Digital_Age.aspx ;

 

PDF: http://www.arup.com/~/media/Files/PDF/Publications/Research_and_whitepapers/2013_Arup_FRI_MuseumsintheDigitalAge_final_web.ashx 

 

Amanda Gregorio's curator insight, October 10, 2014 4:36 PM

Interesting notion

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The Five Laws of The Content Curation Economy by Steve Rosenbaum

The Five Laws of The Content Curation Economy by Steve Rosenbaum | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



Steve Rosenbaum (the author of Curation Nation) strikes some pretty powerful chords that fully resonate with my vision and expectations about the future of content curation.


On the assumption that "The speed, scale, and number of distinct elements of produced content will double every 24 months." (call it Rosenbaum law) he rightly asserts that, as if there was already enough content, we are going to be literally inundated by tons of it soon.


In this light content curation is much more than what content marketing providers would have you think (save some time and get more interesting content out). Content curation is rather a socially critical activity that will make it possible for people to learn, find the information they need and indpendently evaluate what product to buy.


Steve Rosenbaum outlines five principles around which the economy of content curation will establish itself. They are:


The First Law: People don’t want more content, they want less. 



The Second Law: Curators come in three shapes... 



The Third Law: Curation isn’t a hobby, it’s both a profession and a calling. Curators need to be paid...



The Fourth Law: Curation requires technology and tools to find, filter, and validate content...



The Fifth Law: Curation within narrow, focused, high-quality categories will emerge to compete with...



My comment: Steve Rosenbaum is right on track with this one and his five principles are 100% correct. If you are into content curation for the long ride, read them again.



Rightful. On track. 9/10


Full article: http://www.thevideoink.com/features/voices/the-coming-age-of-the-curation-economy-building-context-around-content/ 




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wanderingsalsero's curator insight, October 20, 2013 8:09 PM

Makes sense to me.

Julie Groom's curator insight, October 23, 2013 4:48 AM

Curating - how to manage it. And curation experts already exist - they're called Librarians!

John Thomas's curator insight, February 9, 2014 12:29 PM
The Five Laws of The Content Curation Economy by Steve Rosenbaum
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In Selecting The Best News, Humans Beat Robots, at Last!

In Selecting The Best News, Humans Beat Robots, at Last! | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Lots of people might know about this, some do not, no matter what, it's still good to see it in print.  Human curation works and will play a significant role on the web.

 

Excerpt: After almost a decade, Google is somewhat sheepishly admitting that humans are, well, useful after all.

 

What Google is embracing -- finally -- is the emergence of human curation as a central and critical editorial effort in the increasingly noisy web. Curation, it seems, trumps robots when it comes to both interestingness and editorial tone and voice.

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/steve-rosenbaum/google-news-humans-beat-r_b_926641.html


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