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Create Curated Expert-Filtered Top Link Lists and Categorized "Best Of" Pages with ZEEF

Create Curated Expert-Filtered Top Link Lists and Categorized "Best Of" Pages with ZEEF | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



Zeef is a new web service which allows you to create top link lists on any topic and to group them into useful resources pages. 


Each Zeef page contains multiple link blocks, which you can edit and customize to cover different set of resources for your selected topic. Not only you can simply add a URL and have it instantly added to a link block, but you can also search Google inline, see all the relevant results, and flag all the relevant ones for instant import into any link block.


Link items can be easily dragged and dropped in different positions, and link blogs can be also be easily repositioned on the page in your preferred order.


Text blocks can also be created, to create information modules in which you provide textual information only.


These link lists can then be shared and embedded on other sites, and have been designed to behave in a fashion similar to Google AdSense ad blocks. More specifically: link block content would be triggered by the page context and link blocks can carry affiliate or commercial links.


Finally, a supercool feature allows you to import any web site site structure into Zeef, and to have it auto-organized into link blocks, which you can further edit and arrange as you wish. Powerful.



My comment: Useful tools need not be very complicated. Zeef is a very simple but extremely useful tool as it leverages true experts in competition among themselves (there can be more than one page and more than expert for any topic) and crowdsourced metrics (what people click on) to provide highly curated selections of the best resources on any possible topic.


Zeef is excellent for:


a) experts wanting to share and showcase their competence in specific sectors while providing a useful service 


b) bloggers wanting to enrich the value of their content by providing contextually relevant top-ten link lists


c) companies / advertisers desiring to leverage this tool to provide a highly effective access map to their best content, offers, info and services. See: http://apple.zeef.com  


d) affiliate marketers and affiliate networks desiring to select categories / lists of links rated by experts and wanting to place them on their pages


I highly recommend using Zeef to rapidly organize the best resources on any topic in an effective, useful fashion.


The only addition I'd make to Zeef, would be an optional description-opinion one-liner that an expert can associate to each link he provides. This short info, even within 144 characters, could provide a lot of additional value to the already useful link blocks.


I sincerely hope that the commercial / revenue-making component of Zeef doesn't corrupt on otherwise very promising tool.



Free to use.


Find out more / try it out now: http://zeef.org/  


FAQ: http://zeef.org/faq/ 


Benefits: http://zeef.org/benefits/


Vision: http://zeef.org/vision/


Review: http://startupbeat.com/2013/09/19/featured-startup-pitch-zeef-id3454/ 




My first Zeef page on Content Curation Tools (in progress): https://contentcuration.zeef.com/robin.good 






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Klaas Joosten's comment, September 22, 2013 4:33 PM
Hi, indeed this is a risk, we will offer this download this is very good feedback. But there are not many curated directories with a real business model. Because we are going to use the links blocks on external websites (blogs) like widgets and fill them with affiliate links we give people the opportunity to make money. Most curation websites don't have any way of monetizing their traffic. Our business model is based on a dutch competitor how does 20 million of revenue only in the dutch (Netherlands) market. So if people use your subject page to make their purchasing decision you have helped them and earn some money to keep the platform alive.
Rick Boerebach's comment, September 22, 2013 4:54 PM
Brian, white labeling is on our roadmap, but not yet implemented, what type of features would you like to see?
GIANFRANCO MARINI's curator insight, November 4, 2013 1:06 PM

Zeef è una applicazione web che genera categorie e sarebbe piaciuta molto ad Aristotele e a  Kant.

 

Il suo utilizzo è semplicissimo, basta indicare il nome della nostra collezione di Link, dedicata a uno specifico tema, e quindi procedere a creare, all'interno di quel tema e argomento delle categorie, che sono rese graficamente come blocchi di liste di indirizzi. Aggiungere ai blocchi nuovi indirizzi è altrettanto semplice, basta copiare e incollare l'URL del sito o della risorsa che ci interessa.

 

I blocchi possono essere collocati nell'ordine che preferiamo semplicemente trascinandoli con il mouse nella posizione che più ci piace ed è sempre possibile aggiungere nuovi blocchi.

 

Le liste di Link possono essere condivise e incorporate in altri siti. L'utilizo di questo servizio web è gratuito previa registrazione. 

 

Si tratta di unos trumento utilissimo per organizzare i propri indirizzi in relazione a un tema/argomento specifico in modo da disporre di un archivio specifico, disponibile online, cui poter sempre fare riferimento.

 

Le applicazioni didattiche sono numerose:

1. creare archivi ordinati di risorse web su arogmenti disciplinari o transdisciplinari

2. far realizzare tali archivi dagli studenti in modo da abituarli alla ricerca delle fonti sul web

3. realizzare raccolte di risorse per l'apprendimento di una disciplina o di argomenti di una disciplina da utilizzare in ambito blended learning o flipped learning

4. Si possono creare raccolte, stile top ten, di risorse rilevanti su un dato argomento per arricchire il processo di insegnamento/apprendimento


LINK UTILI

INDIRIZZO:  http://zeef.org/ ;

FAQ. http://zeef.org/faq/

ESEMPIO: la pagina Zeef realizzata da Robin Good relativamente alle risorse per la content curation https://contentcuration.zeef.com/robin.good

Content Curation World
What a Content Curator Needs To Know: How, Tools, Issues and Strategy
Curated by Robin Good
Author: Robin Good   Google+
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Future Content Filters Shall Be User-Driven and Interchangeable

Future Content Filters Shall Be User-Driven and Interchangeable | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



JP Rangaswami highlights and defines seven key principles for effective filtering in this age of excessive information. 


Two of them are of particular important to the future of information access as they may have a very deep impact on society and on our ability to be in control of how to select and find what is relevant for us.


1. Filters, of whatever kind, should be user-driven and not publisher-driven. 


2. Filters should be interchangeable, exchangeable, even tradeable


"What we don’t know is how to solve a much bigger problem: what to do when there are filters at publisher level. Once you allow this, the first thing that happens is that an entry point is created for bad actors to impose some form of censorship.


In some cases it will be governments, sometimes overtly, sometimes covertly; at other times it will be traditional forces of the media; it may be generals of the army or captains of industry.


The nature of the bad actor is irrelevant; what matters is that a back door has been created, one that can be used to suppress reports about a particular event/location/topic/person."

 



Insightful. 7/10



Full article: http://confusedofcalcutta.com/2014/01/03/3740/ 


Reading time: 5'


(via Howard Rheingold)


See also: http://www.masternewmedia.org/future-of-search/ 





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Stephen Dale's curator insight, Today, 11:39 AM
Rangaswami makes his own case for why filters matter:
soon, everything and everyone will be connectedthat includes people, devices, creatures, inanimate objects, even concepts (like a tweet or a theme)at the same time, the cost of sensors and actuators is dropping at least as fast as compute and storageso that means everything and everyone can now publish status and alerts of pretty much anythingthere’s the potential for a whole lotta publishing to happenwhich in turn means it’s firehose timeso we need filterswhich is why the stream/filter/drain approach is becoming more common

 

Filters are important when drinking from the Internet firehose!

Donna Papacosta's curator insight, Today, 12:31 PM

More great insights from Robin Good.

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What Is Curation? Museum and Gallery Curators Define Their Key Skill

Robin Good's insight:



A short video illustrating different viewpoints about what curation is as illustrated by museum curators. 


Video created for the SxSW panel entitled: "Everyone's a Curator: Do Museums Still Matter?"



Interesting. Adds perspective to how academically trained professionals see curation. 7/10


Original video: http://vimeo.com/87716505 





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Veille digitale's curator insight, April 8, 1:16 AM

La Curation expliquée par les conservateurs de Musée ! 

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The Best Online Video Content Curated Into 30' Thematic Programs: Pluto.TV

The Best Online Video Content Curated Into 30' Thematic Programs: Pluto.TV | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Watch the best videos for free, 24/7, on any device. From music to sports, kids, skate, surf, comedy and more—it's out of this world.
Robin Good's insight:



Pluto.tv is a new web service which curates the best video clips available online by organizing content coming from YouTube and many other video sharing sites into thematic programs of 30 minutes each.


The interface is very similar to the one utilized by program guide viewers on standard cable TV.


Pluto.tv offers already more than 100 thematic video channels all curated by human beings.


My comment: An effective approach to surface great video content 

while delivering it in a familiar and consumable format.


 Available also as an app for iOS and Android.


Free to use.


Try it out now: http://pluto.tv 








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Stephen Dale's curator insight, April 4, 5:27 AM

A great example of curated video.

Christian Faisy's curator insight, April 22, 1:08 AM

Chaine web magique, vous sélectionnez simplement le type de contenu que vous souhaitez voir puis vous regardez en direct le meilleur des contenus TV disponibles, sous forme d'une grille de programmes

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Find, Research, Cite, Link and Curate with the Excellent Google Research Tool

Find, Research, Cite, Link and Curate with the Excellent Google Research Tool | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



Google Research is a little-known sidebar available inside Google Drive documents and presentations which allows you to do just-in-time Google searches and to easily curate relevant results, including images, videos, text excerpts, links with full automatic attribution references, into the document or presentation you are preparing.


The Google Research sidebar facility can be called at anytime up by simply going to the Tools menu and selecting "Research" or by selecting any word in your text and then typing Ctrl+Alt+Shft+I.


Once in view, the mini Google Research sidebar, is ready to search across not just the Google standard web results, including news, images, videos and Google Scholar databases, but is also able to instantly filter and sort for you relevant Quotes, Dictionary items, as well as stuff from your own Google Drive documents and tables.


To identify more rapidly relevant resources inside this search sidebar, Google offers the option to "preview" any result, by opening an additional sidebar showcasing a resized view of the web page in question).


Once identified a relevant resource you can either drag and drop it right into your open Google document / presentation (great for images which will also automatically credit)*, or "insert the resource as a link", or "cite" it (by being able to select between MLA; APA and Chicago citation formats).

I have found the Google Research Tool extremely useful, handy and simple to use. If you are researching, writing or curating any kind of article, presentation or report in Google Drive, I highly recommend you try it yourself and let me know what you think of it.


Free to use.


http://drive.google.com 


*I am not suggesting to freely re-use images of others simply because they are accessible via the Google Research Tool. Generally, It is not a good idea to re-use other people images without appropriate authorization from the author.






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Scott Compton's curator insight, April 2, 12:28 PM

 

Good Google Drive feature

Lee Hall's curator insight, April 2, 12:38 PM

This is one of my favorite tools. It pulls up images too and with the new image editing tools it is so easy to put in a nice picture. 

Deborah Welsh's curator insight, April 2, 6:31 PM

You do have to log into your Google account to see this content, but it's a worthwhile step. 

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Content Curation Has Been Hijacked

Content Curation Has Been Hijacked | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



Many content curation startups, and many of the people using curation tools will probably not like what I have written in this article, but I have a hard time behaving as if I couldn't see a cardboard façade that's been sold for a real destination.


Content Curation has been hijacked and has been sold as a cheap and easy solution for content marketers plagued by the growing problem of getting greater attention from their readers and therefore of how to produce more quality content within tighter and tighter time constraints.

The façade is the promotion of the idea that by "adopting" content curation tools and "techniques" (like picking, selecting and showcasing "best of content" to others) you can actually rapidly gain the same benefits and rewards that true, highly reputable curators and experts in any field have conquered after years of hard work.


Worse yet, if you confront content marketers with the idea that what they are encouraging people to do, does in fact create more "noise" and confusion than we already have, content marketers will counter with statistical data demonstrating that this "curation strategy" does indeed pay off and also within relative short times.


What these people miss to see is that you can't really fake what makes a great curator great. You can pick and post lots of stuff, you can share and report to all the channels you want, but the ability and patience to truly vet, verify, unearth and illustrate why something is of value, is just another thing. And anyone who has eyes and time to check, can easily see that.


Once the early curation fad is gone, and once there are millions more people reposting stuff they haven't even read, those who will have patiently spent this time to truly gather, vet, collect, organize, contextualize and illustrate unique documents, information and resources, will instantly become the go-to reference points in their information niche.



Morale of the story: You can reach the top on mountain Everest step by step as much as someone else can get there by helicopter. Both of you see the same view and stand on the same ground, apparently, but what you can bring back and share with others is immensely greater than what the other guy can.


Content curation startups and content marketers promoting the use of content curation should highlight, model and exemplify what true, value-adding curation is and guide their adopters to create more value rather than more, shortly lived, noise.


Content marketing can only benefit from content curation, once it realizes that curation is not a technique that can be adopted or an add-on. Content curation requires a true interest on the part of the curator to uncover, highlight and contextualize high value resources that would otherwise go unnoticed or unappreciated. Otherwise he is wasting not only his time and ours, but also diluting, often forever, his reputation as a trustable source.



Full article: http://www.masternewmedia.org/content-curation-is-not-content-marketing/ 


Reading time: 8'


Suggested readings: Content Curation Guide






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MyKLogica's curator insight, March 21, 2:07 PM

Personalmente, los denomino de formas diferentes, "Gestión" y "Curación" de contenidos, puesto que aunque en la gestión no se aporta el valor diferencial del punto de vista del curador, aún así es una gran labor la de seleccionar buen contenido y ayudar en su difusión.


Personally I call them differently as content "management" and "curation"; as though with management we haven´t the added value of the personal point of view of the curator, still it is a great job to find and select good, quality content.

i.e. Realty's curator insight, March 25, 4:06 PM

Are you creating value or noise?

Barbara Hart Radisavljevic's curator insight, March 26, 7:13 PM

Quality content curation takes time. It takes time to read sources before promoting them. 

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The Value of Curation Expressed in a Beautiful Poem: The Curator

The Value of Curation Expressed in a Beautiful Poem: The Curator | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

"We thought it would come, we thought the Germans would come, were almost certain they would. I was thirty-two, / the youngest assistant curator in the country. I had some good ideas in those days."

Robin Good's insight:



The Curator, by Miller Williams, is a poem that illustrates the keen value of the curator. 

It's a short story, that can be read in just 3 minutes, and which can provide a great metaphor to explain to others, emotionally, what the value of the curator, is all about. 



Beautiful. Inspiring. 9/10


Read it now: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/176491 


Reading time: 3' mins.




Thanks to Nancy White for helping me discover it.

Check her super-interesting article entitled "Students Curators: Powerful Learningand her D20 Innovation blog.  



Image credit: Vintage frame by Shutterstock


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Nancy White's comment, March 12, 11:32 AM
Thank you Robin - I am glad you liked it. Our students were really able to understand the concept of curating through this poem.
aiguarentacar's comment, April 4, 4:13 PM
rescooped this on http://www.scoop.it/u/aiguarentacar
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Why I Don't Like Scoopit Links on Twitter

Why I Don't Like Scoopit Links on Twitter | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

I’m seeing more Scoopit links in my Twitter stream and I’m not crazy about it.  Sure it’s quick and easy to share with Scoopit.  But it not quick and easy to consume. For me it's all about the econ...

Marty Note (here is comment I wrote on Dr. V's blog)

Appreciate Bryan’s and Joseph’s comment, but I rarely use Scoop.it as a pass through. More than 90% of the time I’m adding “rich snippets” to content I Scoop.

Rich snippets are “blog” posts that fall between Twitter and the 500 to 1,000 words I would write in Scenttrail Marketing. I often create original content ON Scoop.it because whatever I’m writing falls in the crack between Twitter’s micro blog and what I think of as needing to be on my marketing blog.


I was taught NOT to pass through links on Scoop.it early on by the great curator @Robin Good . Robin has well over 1M views on Scoop.it now and his advice along with the patient advice of other great Scoop.it curators has my profile slouching toward 150,000 views.


Bryan is correct that some curators new to Scoop.it haven’t learned the Robin Good lesson yet. I agree it is frustrating to go to a link and not receive anything of value back, to simply need to click on another link. Curators who pass through links won’t scale, so the Darwinian impact will be they will learn to add value or die out.


For my part I always identify my Scoop.it links, probably about half the content I Tweet and about a quarter of my G+ shares. I also routinely share my favorite “Scoopiteers”, great content curators who taught me valuable lessons such as don’t simply pass through links but add “micro blogging” value via rich snippets.


When you follow or consistently share content from a great curator on Scooop.it you begin to understand HOW they shape the subjects they curate. I know, for example, Robin Good is amazing on new tools. Scoop.it anticipated this learning and built in a feature where I can suggest something to Robin.


This is when Scoop.it is at its most crowdsourcing best because I now have an army of curators who know I like to comment on and share content about design or BI or startups and they (other Scoopiteers) keep an eye out for me. There are several reasons Scoop.it is a “get more with less effort” tool and this crowdsourcing my curation is high on the list.


So, sorry you are sad to see Scoop.it links and understand your frustration. You’ve correctly identified the problem too – some curators don’t know how to use the tool yet. I know it is a lot to ask to wait for the Darwinian learning that will take place over generations, but Scoop.it and the web have “generations” that have the half life of a gnat so trust that the richness of the Scoop.it community will win in the end and “the end” won’t take long.


To my fellow Scoop.it curators we owe Bryan and Joseph thanks for reminding us of what Robin Good taught me – add value or your Scoop.it won’t scale. That lessons is applicable to much more than how we use Scoop.it.


Marty

Added to G+ too
https://plus.google.com/102639884404823294558/posts/TUsNtsAsjWp

 


Via Martin (Marty) Smith
Robin Good's insight:

Well, I can't really agree more with Marty's point.

On the other hand Scoop.it, and a number of similar platforms,  are heavily promoted as a content marketing platforms that promise to a) save you time and b) allow you to post more content.

And then, unless you heavily moderate and surface editorial models that can guide other users, you tend to level down to the lowest common denominator. 

This is what I see happening and I regret it as well.

Thanks Marty for highlighting it. 

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Peg Corwin's comment, March 10, 6:54 PM
Further to Therese Torris' comment, might we ask Scoop.it for a setting that allows us to choose to automatically tweet the post author when we re-scoop? It takes many clicks back and forth to get and add it.
Martin (Marty) Smith's comment, March 10, 7:06 PM
Yes @Peg Corwin I see your "filtering" much like @Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com work as providing value. As Brian shared he discard much more content than he is sharing. I think this builds on Robin's idea of "value" and its meaningful, fast and valuable to those who understand that filtering is the primary activity. I don't think its hard to know this since the second time a customer follows a link of yours or Brian's they know they are following your curation suggestion. On Sunday I thought "pass through" was an unsustainable model. After a day of #startup school I am not so sure. You and Brian are building a themed castle one brick (one share) at a time as surely as I am or anyone else using Scoop.it. Today it feels like a defined link share as you and Brian have described is a valuable service. <br><br>You've hit the primary value AND I often cut the middle man out (something it isn't hard to do ust use Google to search the title). Bryan (Dr V) was complaining about the extra click and that is why I sometimes jump past the pass through too, but since that jump isn't difficult and the oeuvre you create has merit as a whole I think we are simply approach the same problem with a slightly different approach (pass through vs. value add). I think you and Brian are SAVING TIME since you evaluate mor content than you share. <br><br>Despite Dr. V's complaint about seeing Scoop.it links I think that is an important signal and a signals that connects the IDEA of your curation as a whole, so I would say when you drive to Scoop.it using a Scoop.it moniker is a good idea. M
Peg Corwin's comment, March 11, 9:19 AM
Thanks Marty. I think indexing a topic like this adds value in a different way to the curation. http://website.pegcorwin.com/p/4010710384/2013/11/09/popular-topics
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Curate Your Browsing Experience with OneTab for Google Chrome

Curate Your Browsing Experience with OneTab for Google Chrome | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



If you are a blogger, news reporter or better yet a content curator, you are certainly familiar with having so many tabs open in your browser, with interesting stuff to check out later, that your computer slows down to a crawl. 


To avoid this common situation a new free Chrome browser extension comes to the rescue. It is called OneTab and it allows you to instantly memorize and save all of your open tabs into an orderly page in which they are listed, and re-openable at any time. 


In the OneTab page where your tabs are all saved, you can re-order them in any way you want, group them, export them to other systems or even share them as a public web page.



Extremely useful. 9/10


Try it out now: https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/onetab/chphlpgkkbolifaimnlloiipkdnihall/reviews?hl=en 


More info: http://www.one-tab.com/ 


Help: http://www.one-tab.com/help 






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Farid Mheir's comment, March 31, 11:58 AM
@Gonzalo Moreno : sorry I do not know if this exists for other browsers.
Farid Mheir's comment, March 31, 11:58 AM
@Gonzalo Moreno : sorry I do not know if this exists for other browsers.
Gonzalo Moreno's curator insight, March 31, 12:01 PM

Para multitaskers compulsivos, como yo, tener 100 pestañas abiertas a la vez es inevitable, con la consecuente ralentización del ordenador.
De momento sólo existe para Chrome, pero esta herramienta es la solución definitiva!
:D

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The Future of News Is Not About Facts: It's About Context, Relevance and Opinion

The Future of News Is Not About Facts: It's About Context, Relevance and Opinion | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

"News sources can't just give us the facts. They must tell us what those facts mean."

Robin Good's insight:



Here's a refreshing look at the future of news that highlights the importance of going deeper into creating value for readers by providing more focus, relevance, context and opinion.

These are the characters that properly define what we now refer to as "curation" when it comes to content and news.


The following passages, extracted from the book, The News: A User's Manual, are by Alain de Botton, and have been excerpted from a lengthy article on The Week entitled "The Future of News".


"News organizations are coy about admitting that what they present us with each day are minuscule extracts of narratives whose true shape and logic can generally only emerge from a perspective of months or even years — and that it would hence often be wiser to hear the story in chapters rather than snatched sentences.


They [news organizations] are institutionally committed to implying that it is inevitably better to have a shaky and partial grasp of a subject this minute than to wait for a more secure and comprehensive understanding somewhere down the line.


...


We need news organizations to help our curiosity by signaling how their stories fit into the larger themes on which a sincere capacity for interest depends.


To grow interested in any piece of information, we need somewhere to "put" it, which means some way of connecting it to an issue we already know how to care about.


A section of the human brain might be pictured as a library in which information is shelved under certain fundamental categories. Most of what we hear about day to day easily signals where in the stacks it should go and gets immediately and unconsciously filed.


... the stranger or the smaller stories become, the harder the shelving process grows. What we colloquially call "feeling bored" is just the mind, acting out of a self-preserving reflex, ejecting information it has despaired of knowing where to place.


...We might need help in transporting such orphaned pieces of information to the stacks that would most appropriately reveal their logic.


...it is news organizations to take on some of this librarian's work. It is for them to give us a sense of the larger headings under which minor incidents belong."

 


The call for understanding how much greater value can be provided by curating news and information in depth, rather than by following the shallow, buzzy and viral path beaten by HuffPo, Buzzfeed and the rest of the gang, is clear.


But beyond context and depth, real value can only be added if we accept the fact that going beyond the classic "objective fact reporting", by adding opinion and bias in a transparent fashion, can actually provide greater value in many ways, as Alain de Botton clearly explains:


"Unfortunately for our levels of engagement, there is a prejudice at large within many news organizations that the most prestigious aspect of journalism is the dispassionate and neutral presentation of "facts."


...


The problem with facts is that there is nowadays no shortage of sound examples. The issue is not that we need more of them, but that we don't know what to do with the ones we have...


...But what do these things actually mean? How are they related to the central questions of political life? What can they help us to understand?


...The opposite of facts is bias. In serious journalistic quarters, bias has a very bad name. It is synonymous with malevolent agendas, lies, and authoritarian attempts to deny audiences the freedom to make up their own minds.


Yet we should perhaps be more generous toward bias.


In its pure form, a bias simply indicates a method of evaluating events that is guided by a coherent underlying thesis about human functioning and flourishing.


It is a pair of lenses that slide over reality and aim to bring it more clearly into focus.


Bias strives to explain what events mean and introduces a scale of values by which to judge ideas and events. It seems excessive to try to escape from bias per se; the task is rather to find ways to alight on its more reliable and fruitful examples. 


There are countless worthy lenses to slide between ourselves and the world." 


Overall, these ideas offer a truly refreshing look at the future of news and at the relevance that context and opinion could play in transforming this medium from a vehicle of mass distraction to one of focused learning and understanding for those interested. 



Must read. Rightful. Insightful. 9/10



Full article: http://theweek.com/article/index/256737/the-future-of-news 


Reading time: 10':20"






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Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, February 25, 2:36 PM

El futuro de las Noticias no es sobre los Hechos, sino sobre contexto, relevancia y opinión.

Catherine Pascal's curator insight, March 3, 5:12 AM

 Intéressant 

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A Curated Collection of The Best Search Engines Organized Around Your Needs

A Curated Collection of The Best Search Engines Organized Around Your Needs | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



A curated selection of the best search engines organized according to what you need to find.


Useful. Great example of how to create a useful, curated information resource. 


Free to use.


Full resource: http://www.noodletools.com/debbie/literacies/information/5locate/adviceengine.html 




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Mary Clark's curator insight, March 9, 11:15 PM

Exactly what it says!  Via @Robin Good

Terheck's curator insight, March 10, 4:01 AM

A good selection of search engines organized according to what you need to find.

Fatima Formariz's curator insight, March 31, 5:41 PM

Refining research by choosing best fitting search engines..

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Internal News Curation and Resource Sharing For Your Organization with NewsDeck

Robin Good's insight:



NewsDeck is a news curation app that allows to organize and share breaking news and resources with specific teams and departments within an organization.


Any web page article or resources can be easily collected with a bookmarklet and assigned to a specific group or project.


Collections of saved news appear inside Pinterest-like visual boards.


Users can join the groups they are most interested into without needing to be bombarded with useless info that it's not relevant to them.


News and resources can also be added directly via email.


Free to use.



More info: http://www.newsdeck.com/


 


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A Crowdsourced Curated Database of the Best Educational Tools and Learning Apps: GEDB

A Crowdsourced Curated Database of the Best Educational Tools and Learning Apps: GEDB | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Robin Good's insight:



GEDB, the Global Education Database, is a great and extremely useful curated collection of the best apps, web tools, gadgets and moocs now available online for educational purposes.


Anyone can register to GEDB and submit any valuable resource or tool by filling out the dedicated form.


Submissions are reviewed for factual accuracy and integrity and approved and published within 24 hours. Readers and contributors can in turn rate the review and share it online.



This is a great educational resource, simple to consult and well organized. A treasure trove of qualified resources for anyone wanting to teach and learn with new technologies.



Free to use.


Try it out now: http://www.gedb.org/ 




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Jeroen Boon's curator insight, February 21, 8:06 AM

De Global Education Database (GEDB), is een zeer groot en nuttige verzameling van de beste apps, web tools, gadgets en moocs nu online beschikbaar voor allerlei educatieve doeleinden. Iedereen kan zich registreren bij GEDB en waardevol hulpmiddelen of instrumenten delen door het invullen van een speciaal formulier. Inzendingen worden beoordeeld op feitelijke onjuistheden en integriteit en wanneer goedgekeurd gepubliceerd binnen 24 uur. 

Probeer het nu: http://www.gedb.org/

Gonzalo Moreno's curator insight, February 22, 7:18 AM

Learning Tools - management?

Diana Andone's curator insight, February 25, 12:59 AM

GEDB, the Global Education Database, is a great and extremely useful curated collection of the best apps, web tools, gadgets and moocs now available online for educational purposes.

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Create, Publish and Curate Your Company Social Hub with Uberflip

Create, Publish and Curate Your Company Social Hub with Uberflip | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



Uberflip is a new web publishing tool that allows a company to easily create a social hub populated with the most relevant content coming from their main media properties, including blogs, RSS feeds, social media channels, images and videos, presentations and PDF documents.


Uberflip publishing metaphor is the "hub" in which, similarly to Rebelmouse and Pressly you can create multiple channels where you either aggregate or curate theme-specific content.


Among Uberflip unique features there is the ability to import and convert PDF documents into editable flipbooks, an array of widgets that can be added to integrate more functionalities (e.g.: Disqus comments) and a call-to-action feature allowing you to integrate customizable and elegant subscription boxes that directly connect to your newsletter provider (e.g.: Malchimp). 


Check my test site to get an idea of what you can do with it: http://robingood.uberflip.com/h/ 


My comment: Compared to Rebelmouse, Pressly, Uberflip is a tough contender. Its key strengths are the elegant and clean output design, which displays excellently also on tablets and smartphones and the breadth of features for curating and collecting content (e.g.: custom collections). Uberflip is also the only tool of this kind that integrates a PDF to flipbook conversion engine, allowing you to integrate any company PDF into one or more collections in a beautiful format to view.


The Basic version, which allows for one hub with multiple channels, one custom collection and one CTA costs $49.95/month. Higher priced versions at 199 and 499/mo allow for using your custom domain, more collections, CTAs and additional features including analytics and other features.    


Pricing info: http://www.uberflip.com/pricing 


Free 14-day trial.



Ty it out now: http://www.uberflip.com/ 


My test site: http://robigood.uberflip.com 



-> Added to Social Media Aggregators & Hubs in the Content Curation Tools Supermap




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Social Media Curation Is Not Just Sharing Bookmarks: An Introductory Guide [Video]

Video from Curation Module of Social Media for Active Learning Course. http://meme.coe.fsu.edu/smooc #SMOOC2014
Robin Good's insight:



If you are new to content curation and interested in understanding better how social media, bookmarking and sharing fit into the curation conundrum, then this is a useful video to watch. 


Vanessa Dennen, Associate Professor of Instructional Systems at Florida State University, presents in a clear and very understandable 6 minute clip, what social media curation is, how it differs from simple bookmarking and which are some of the tools to get started doing it.


She also offers an excellent definition for "social media curation": Organized and purposeful collecting and sharing of annotated, online content, as well as a six-step process (called FACETS) to effectively curate content online.



Instructional. Informative. Useful for beginners. 7/10


Original video: http://youtu.be/twvNJ5NCLEU 


Duration: 6':10"



via Eric A. Tremblay blog

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Joyce Valenza's curator insight, April 16, 5:55 PM

This overview video introduces and defines curation and describes the affordances of the top tools.

TeresaSiluar's curator insight, April 17, 4:09 AM

Interesante video (en inglés) sobre  el proceso y posibilidades de la curación de contenidos en Redes Sociales

Nicoletta Gay's curator insight, April 22, 6:15 AM

If you share your bookmarks with someone else, would they be able to make sense of them?

Social media curation: organized and purposeful collecting and sharing of annotated, online content 

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A Curated Newsletter of Little Gems: VLS a Very Short List

A Curated Newsletter of Little Gems: VLS a Very Short List | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



VLS, or VeryShortList is an email newsletter and website, that brings in each daily issue a few selected high-value resources from a different human curator.


Each day of the week has a color and a theme.

Each edition of VSL lists three unique resources on that theme.
See: http://www.veryshortlist.com/about/  


An excellent and well tested example of curation at work, VLS is alive since 2006 and the quality of its curation work allow for a discrete sponsorship presence to support this unique quality publication.



Check it out now.


Free to use: http://www.veryshortlist.com/ 


Archives: http://www.veryshortlist.com/lists/ 


Curated by: Alexa Jaccarino






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Beth Kanter's comment, April 9, 12:21 PM
Does this answer your question about whether the web can be hand curated or not?
Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's curator insight, April 9, 11:24 PM

Great idea for curating via email newsletter.  

LLatipi's curator insight, April 9, 11:28 PM

#VeryShortList

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An Inside Look At News Curation Apps from the RJI Futures Lab

Robin Good's insight:



This short but quite interesting video update looks at emerging news curation apps designed to gather and select the most relevant news for their users. 

Circa's David Cohn, Inside's Jason Calacanis and Newsy's Jim Spencer provide key insight into what their news discovery services are offering and how they use curation to achieve this result.  


The video covers also the value of curation over original journalism and issues of copyright and fair use.


Interesting. Informative. 7/10


Original video: http://youtu.be/Gf3SYrt2Jgw 



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Bob Boynton's comment, March 31, 12:51 AM
I cannot use my scoop.it because I am following you and I do not have adobe flash installed, and I do not want adobe flash installed. But the video will not let me access my scoop.it.
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Algorithms: The Glue Between Content, Data and Insight

Algorithms: The Glue Between Content, Data and Insight | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:


Lutz Finger, reports from SxSW on the topic of algorithms, curation and the future, as the skills of content creators, data analysts and code programmers are seemingly converging for the first time. 


Among others, he reports Steve Rosenbaum (founder of Magnify.net) significant own words at SxSW: "...a wise combination of human judgement enabled by algorithms will become the new king of content."


But while there are great new tools, startups and ideas leveraging the great potential of big data and human curation, there is a big, invisible danger, still looming on us.


"The danger is that any algorithm might fall prey to someone trying to influence it.

This might be the ones programming the algorithm or the users. We for instance saw governments trying to skew algorithms by introducing fake online personas (
Learn more about the US government persona-management software).
 

But the biggest and realest danger lies in us.

If we believe that there is only one truth and that is the one generated by a black-box algorithm we might be deceived easily."



Informative. Resourceful. 7/10



Full article: http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20140320132545-6074593-the-age-of-the-algorithms-sxsw-summary 


See also: www.masternewmedia.org/future-of-search


Image: Bjoern Ognibeni - SxSW




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Georges Millet's curator insight, March 25, 4:10 AM

Knowledge & life turning today into a (google) search. Algorithms are key!  

Stephen Dale's curator insight, March 26, 4:35 AM

"We are in the era of the algorithm. They decide what news we will see, they decide which person is important and they will even merge more and more into our non-digital lives.

 

But the biggest and realest danger lies in us. If we believe that there is only one truth and that is the one generated by a black-box algorithm we might be deceived easily."

 

A reminder, then, that algorithm's should not take the place of critical thinking.

Mariale Peñalosa Arguijo's curator insight, March 26, 9:44 AM

 

 10
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Content Curation: How To Help Students Learn, Discover and Make Sense of New Topics All By Themselves

Content Curation: How To Help Students Learn, Discover and Make Sense of New Topics All By Themselves | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



Here's a short first-hand report highlighting how an 8th grade social studies class teacher (Terri Inloes) has fully leveraged the content curation potential to let her students dive, discover and make sense of topics (in this case social reform movements) that they had not studied before. All by themselves.


Here the steps taken to make this happen:


a) By using the Question Formulation Technique, the teacher prepared pairs of photographs representing each of the reform movements, one picture dating back to the late 19th century, and another representing where that social reform movement stands in today’s society. 


b) After checking out all of the photos, students settled on the pair of pictures that most caught their interest.


c) They brainstormed and refined a set of specific questions, and then shared their thinking with the class.

d) With the feedback received they selected the topic which they would curate.

e) At this point students planned their research strategies. By using 5 different graphic organizers from the book Q Tasks, by Carol Koechlin and Sandi Zwaan, students were allowed to choose the one that they thought would help them the most in planning their keyword search strategies. 


f) Students were assigned WordPress blogs and provided basic instructions on how to use them to curate and publish their research work.


g) Discovery and real learning kicked in as students proceeded in collaborative groups to research and document their chosen topic. 


You can see some of the outcomes that this assignment produced right here:


General Conclusions

http://tmsredvotingrights.d20blogs.org/2014/02/24/conclusion-3/


Voting Rights Inequality

http://tmsredvotingrights.d20blogs.org/


Mental Health Treatment
http://tmsorangementalhealthcaretreatments.d20blogs.org/


Prohibition Acts

http://tmsorangeprohibitionacts.d20blogs.org/ 

 



A very inspiring example of content curation can be effectively applied in the classroom with impressive results. 


Highly recommended. 9/10


Thanks to Nancy White of Innovations in Education for participating, writing and reporting about it.



Original post: http://www.techlearning.com/Default.aspx?tabid=67&entryid=7296  



 

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Audrey's curator insight, March 21, 7:30 PM

Curating is about finding and selecting information in order to learn about a subject. Youngsters can be encouraged to do this  pre-school.  This motivational 21st century skill can be encouraged at home. with educational games toys and and books which stimulates interest.  For example children can learn about  science by interacting with Chemistry Lab; Horrible Science - explosive experiments; Newton's Cradle and Science Museum.  By the time they get to school they are already full of curiosity and ready to increase their knowledge.  Audrey curating for www.homeschoolsource.co.uk

Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, March 30, 9:27 AM

By Robin Good,

Here's a short first-hand report highlighting how an 8th grade social studies class teacher (Terri Inloes) has fully leveraged the content curation potential to let her students dive, discover and make sense of topics (in this case social reform movements) that they had not studied before. All by themselves.


Here the steps taken to make this happen:


a) By using the Question Formulation Technique, the teacher prepared pairs of photographs representing each of the reform movements, one picture dating back to the late 19th century, and another representing where that social reform movement stands in today’s society. 


b) After checking out all of the photos, students settled on the pair of pictures that most caught their interest.


c) They brainstormed and refined a set of specific questions, and then shared their thinking with the class. 

d) With the feedback received they selected the topic which they would curate. 

e) At this point students planned their research strategies. By using 5 different graphic organizers from the book Q Tasks, by Carol Koechlin and Sandi Zwaan, students were allowed to choose the one that they thought would help them the most in planning their keyword search strategies. 


f) Students were assigned WordPress blogs and provided basic instructions on how to use them to 

curate and publish their research work.


g) Discovery and real learning kicked in as students proceeded in collaborative groups to research and document their chosen topic. 


You can see some of the outcomes that this assignment produced right here:


General Conclusions

http://tmsredvotingrights.d20blogs.org/2014/02/24/conclusion-3/


Voting Rights Inequality

http://tmsredvotingrights.d20blogs.org/


Mental Health Treatment
http://tmsorangementalhealthcaretreatments.d20blogs.org/


Prohibition Acts

http://tmsorangeprohibitionacts.d20blogs.org/ 

 



A very inspiring example of content curation can be effectively applied in the classroom with impressive results. 


Highly recommended. 9/10


Thanks to Nancy White of Innovations in Education for participating, writing and reporting about it.

 Thanks to Robin Good for the fine summary in this insight.
The ideas here offer a great classroom challenge to students.{Monica}
Glenda Morris's curator insight, April 8, 2:57 PM

Important 21st century skills

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Access Broken URLs and Dead Web Pages with Resurrect for Firefox

Access Broken URLs and Dead Web Pages with Resurrect for Firefox | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



Resurrect Pages is a free Firefox Add-on that allows you to instantly find archived and cached copies for any dead page or broken URL.


Specifically, Resurrect searches through these cache/mirrors:

  • CoralCDN
  • Google Cache
  • Yahoo! Cache
  • The Internet Archive
  • MSN Cache
  • Gigablast
  • WebCite


Free to use.


Try it out now: https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/resurrect-pages/ 





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Capture, Edit, Collect and Organize Images and Full Web Pages with Ember (Mac)

Capture, Edit, Collect and Organize Images and Full Web Pages with Ember (Mac) | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Collect the things you love, with Ember. Whether you’re capturing photos, screenshots or any other kind of image - save, annotate and sync it with Ember.
Robin Good's insight:



Ember is a Mac and iOS app that allows you to easily capture parts of a screen, a specific image, a whole window or a full web page easily and to edit it, collect it and organize it according to tags, themes/groups and colours.


Ember key strengths are:


a) the image "capture" toolset, which is second to none. It offers maximum flexibility, it is simple, and allows you to save directly to any folder/group/collection you have set-up.


b) the image editor utility that integrates a set of useful tools that includes cropper, focus/blur areas, rotate, add text, freehand drawing.


c) the elegantly designed "library" where you can organize your images and screenshots easily via drag and drop into collections. Each image can also have a description and multiple tags. In addition Ember can automatically sort all your images by colors.


d) the "subscription" area where you subscribe to image feeds from various sites and galleries to get inspiration and ideas.


iCloud-syncable.


Ember is a beautifully designed app that does a fantastic job of capturing any kind of image or screenshot from the web and to give you relevant tools to edit it and "curate" it into private collections.

N.B.: Though Ember is really a great app to use, I would not pay its relatively hefty price tag, unless it allowed me to publish or export (in a publishable format) some of my collections.


Free to 14-day trial.

Price £.34.99 


N.B.: Ember requires Mac OSX Mavericks to run.


More info: http://realmacsoftware.com/ember 


Free trial: http://realmacsoftware.com/redirects/ember/try/ 


Download from Mac App Store: http://realmacsoftware.com/redirects/ember/appstore 


Download from iOS App Store: http://realmacsoftware.com/redirects/ember-ios/appstore 



Check these two use cases: 






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Nine0Media's curator insight, March 6, 9:17 PM

#WebConsultants #WordpressExperts

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Content Curation Introduction for Digital Archivists and Information Librarians

Content Curation Introduction for Digital Archivists and Information Librarians | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:


Crystal Renfro, a subject and Faculty Engagement Librarian at Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, Georgia, introduces the relevance of content curation to academic librarians beyond the notions generally prescribed by Digital and Data Curation specialists. 

She highlights content curation importance and reason d'etre by explaining the goal it is trying to achieve (helping us finding what is truly relevant) and providing references both to Beth Kanter and to my own work, to help academics better appreciate the benefits of embracing content curation.


A good introduction to a new way of looking at curation for digital archive specialists and academic information librarians. 


Rightful. Informative. Good introduction. 7/10


Full article: http://www.academicpkm.org/2014/03/03/content-curation-beyond-institutional-repository-library-archives/ 


Reading time: 4'




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Crystal Renfro's curator insight, March 4, 7:08 AM

I really appreciate Robin Good's comments on my article from Academicpkm.org.  He says:

 

"Robin Good's insight:

 

Crystal Renfro, a subject and Faculty Engagement Librarian at Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, Georgia, introduces the relevance of content curation to academic librarians beyond the notions generally prescribed by Digital and Data Curation specialists. 

She highlights content curation importance and reason d'etre by explaining the goal it is trying to achieve (helping us finding what is truly relevant) and providing references both to Beth Kanter and to my own work, to help academics better appreciate the benefits of embracing content curation.

 

A good introduction to a new way of looking at curation for digital archive specialists and academic information librarians. 

 

Rightful. Informative. Good introduction. 7/10"

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Collect and Organize Live Web Content Snippets Into Dynamic Collections with Wepware

Collect and Organize Live Web Content Snippets Into Dynamic Collections with Wepware | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



Wepware is a new web app which allows you to capture any web page or portion of it and organize it into Pinterest-like boards which can be easily published and shared on social media channels.


Unique strengths include the ability to capture dynamic information boxes (flight schedule, sport scores, etc.) that will continue to be updated even when they are inside your curated collections. In addition, such live dynamic info snippets can be easily pasted on any web page you want and kept there as a live reference.


My comment: Powerful dynamic capture feature allows the creation of unique dynamic dashboards that collect and organize information from various sources in real-time.


Available as a Chrome browser extension.


Free to use.


Try it out now: http://www.wepware.com/ 


More info: http://www.wepware.com/web/landing 





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Louise Quo Vadis's curator insight, February 24, 1:09 PM

I like this a lot, but it is only good for the Chrome browser. Check it out.

wanderingsalsero's curator insight, February 25, 5:09 AM

I can see where this could be very useful to a business owner wanting to aggregate content for his/her customers.

Nine0Media's curator insight, February 25, 9:30 PM

Great for #ContentCuration #WebConsultants 

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Capture Any Content from the Web and Organize Into Boards with ScissorsFly

Capture Any Content from the Web and Organize Into Boards with ScissorsFly | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



Scissorsfly is a great new web app which allows you to "photograph" any screen or part of it and to collect and organize these pictures into Pinterest-like boards.


The capture functionality allows you to not just to pick images available on a web page as you would do with Pinterest but it allows you to clip any part of a web page or a full visible screen as you may see fit.


Differently than on Pinterest, the collected items can be easily arranged, positioned and resized on the board.


Scissorsfly provides a Chrome browser extension (Firefox and Safari coming soon) that once clicked provides a small toolbar with all of the key commands available.


Free to use.


Excellent capture and collect tool, provides lots of the original functionalities available in the now defunct Clipboard.com. Unfortunately there is no ability to capture a full web page, from top to bottom, but outside of this, I really found Scissorsfly to be an excellent tool for capturing and curating ay type of content available online.  


Try it out now: https://www.scissorsfly.com/ 


Chrome app store: https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/scissorsfly/hjhmkhdbecgcmhohojlcjddicnbgahcp/details 






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Mike Power's curator insight, February 24, 6:12 AM

Interesting looking tool. In Beta so it will only get better. UI is a bit ugly but that's not a deal breaker. 

Joyce Valenza's curator insight, February 24, 8:12 AM

Looks promising and pretty for curation.

Nine0Media's curator insight, February 25, 9:31 PM

Very cool! #WebConsultants #WebDesign

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Capture, Permanently Archive and Download Any Web Page for Free with Archive.is

Capture, Permanently Archive and Download Any Web Page for Free with Archive.is | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



Archive.is is a free web service which allows you to capture, store and archive permanently any web page you submit. 


Archive.is permanently stores a double copy of your selected web site: one that is an image snapshot of the page, and another which contains the full text of it. Archive.is also provides a download link that contains a zipped copy of all the files making up your selected page, and which can be opened offline in any web browser. 


Archive.is can save most any type of web page including Facebook pages and it allows you to easily search and see all of the pages already saved for a certain domain.


There is no registration or login required and you don't need to install anything. 


A free dedicated bookmarklet makes it easy to capture and archive any web page you happen to be on.



If you are looking for a free, simple and easy to use service to archive any web page permanently, I recommend Archive.is.


Free to use.


Try it out now: http://archive.is/ 


Useful info on blog page: http://blog.archive.is/   




Added to Permanent Web Page Archiving Tools section of the Content Curation Tools Directory




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Louis Foussard's curator insight, February 22, 9:13 AM

For more news visit http://www.internetmarketingstpaul.com/news/

jspellos's curator insight, February 22, 10:25 AM

Great tool to quickly save web pages, including social media pages with hashtags.  Don't forget to grab the bookmarklet and move it onto your browser, too!

Alison Hewett's curator insight, February 28, 4:01 PM

This could be handy to use with students looking at how internet based media can change and a story be altered. use this tool to preserve current ate of a story at a particular day/time.

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Social Curation with Twitter: a Research Study by NTT

Robin Good's insight:



From the paper abstract:  "Social media such as microblogs have become so pervasive such that it is now possible to use them as sensors for real-world events and memes.


While much recent research has focused on developing automatic methods for filtering and summarizing these data streams, we explore a different trend called social curation.


In contrast to automatic methods, social curation is characterized as a human-in-the-loop and sometimes crowd-sourced mechanism for exploiting social media as sensors."


The paper attempts to analyze curated microblog data and to understand the main reasons why people "participate in this laborious curation process".


It also looks at "new ways in which information retrieval and machine learning technologies can be used to assist curators" and it also suggests "a novel method based on a learning-to-rank framework that increases the curator's productivity and breadth of perspective by suggests which novel microblogs should be added to the curated content."


The paper contains valuable information for anyone interested in having more statistical data about social curation activities and patterns on Twitter, the use of lists and the typical reasons why individuals want to do this. 



Interesting. 7/10


Full original PDF paper:  http://cl.naist.jp/~kevinduh/papers/duh12curation-long.pdf 





 


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