Content Curation World
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What a Content Curator Needs To Know: How, Tools, Issues and Strategy
Curated by Robin Good
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The Future of Search May Not Be About Google: It's You In The End Who Will Decide

The Future of Search May Not Be About Google: It's You In The End Who Will Decide | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
There is a evil side of Google which revealed itself in the Filter Bubble, invasion of privacy, the lack of transparency, in the monopoly induction of behavior and especially in what is happening in the search environment.
Robin Good's insight:



The future of search may not just be about Google and Bing. In the future of search, believe it or not, there are going to be a lot of people like you and me who will be providing much more helpful information guidance to specific requests than Google could ever do.


I know this sounds probably unrealistic to you, but I think there are now many good indications that this likely going to happen much sooner than you expect.


One of the key reasons why, human beings will start to reclaim this highly valuable search territory, is the fact that in the last few years we have slowly but deeply surrendered our ability to evaluate, decide and select what is "real" to Google's own algorithms, in ways that can only be detrimental to us.


You have probably read in recent times that Google is moving to use "semantic search" rather than the keyword-based approach it has been using until now. 


Do you know that "in semantic search, the decisions are not based on statistics, but rather on world models"?


"How about searching for "Dictators of the World?" The results, which include a list of famous dictators, are not just the judgment of whether someone is a dictator, but also an implicit judgment of choosing individual examples for the concept of a dictator. 


When building knowledge over concepts such as "Dictator" in the search engines, we are implicitly accepting a set of assumptions."


"It is needed to question and monitor these models, for in the past, the significance was only in the human mind. Now, it is also in the mind of the engines that forward us information. 


The search bears an editorial point of view, and its results reflect this point of view. 


We can’t ignore the assumptions behind these results. The invisible judgments will frame our conscience."


Here is a must read article by Zeh Fernandes, that wants to ignite an open discussion about "how the Google monopoly is affecting the way we search for and receive information on the internet".


I think that this is a topic deserving the highest attention and I highly recommend to read in full this excellent article, especially to content curators, information librarians and any other individual concerned with our future ability to vet, organize and make sense of the ocean of information surrounding us.


Alternative search tools and content curators are the future.



Good reminder of what we are eating daily. Insightful. Eye-opening. 10/10


Read this: http://zehfernandes.com/the-evil-side-of-google/ 








Claude Terosier's curator insight, January 13, 2014 2:44 AM

"we should worry about search engines becoming the arbiters of truth." De l'importance de comprendre comment on accède à l'information et de reprendre la main.

Stephen Dale's curator insight, January 13, 2014 5:58 AM

People who use Google are given the impression that they are interacting with the data out there, but they are actually interacting with Google and its view of the world.

 

"They are prediction engines that constantly refine a theory about who you are and what you are going to do or want next. Together, they create an universe of data for each one of us."

"In a 2010 paper published in the Scientific American journal, Tim Berners-Lee warned about companies developing ever more “closed” products and “data islands”.

"Morville, in his book Search Patterns, says that the first and second results receive 80% of attention. The vertical approach suggests to the user the idea of a single result that fully answers the question, enclosing possibilities and preventing alternative realization."


Or in other words, is our acceptance of what we see in search results eroding our ability (or willingness) to consider alternatives and employ critical thinking?

Mrs. Dilling's curator insight, February 13, 2014 11:52 AM

My favorite statement, "we must always be aware and well informed about the intentions of companies, and never stop having multiple options for any service."

 

This article was an eye opener for me. I had never questioned Google before.

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The Future of Learning Is All About Curation and Search



Robin Good's insight:



If you are curious to know what I think about curation and search and their future, check out this 3-minute audio excerpt from a much longer interview about curating your experience I had with Joel Zasflosky of ValueofSimple.

In it I highlight how inadequate is to expect Google results to fulfill the need that many people have to learn and deepen their knowledge about a topic they are not familiar with.

Google set of very specific, highly filtered and ranked text results represent many, often relevant, individual bites of a larger puzzle that is never shown.

You are provided tons of individual trees in place of the "forest" you have asked about.

That is the greatest limitation for Google… when it comes the need, not to find a specific book, product, event or person, but for learning, understanding, for seeing the bigger picture, then the individual bites, ranked by Google authority or Pagerank, just don't serve our need.

This is why, just like we can't feed our appetites only with Big Macs, when it comes to learning about a topic we're not familiar with, we will increasingly rely on curated search engines, trusted guides and portals who can provide us with a much better and more useful roadmap into learning than Google can.


Audio excerpt: https://soundcloud.com/user458849/curation-and-search-joel


Full interview: http://valueofsimple.com/smart-and-simple-matters-podcast-023-with-robin-good/ 


MP3 full interview: http://traffic.libsyn.com/valueofsimple/023_SmartAndSimpleMattersPodcastFromValueOfSimple.mp3


Subscribe to iTunes podcast: http://valueofsimple.com/itunes







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Why Google, Yahoo and Others Are Making You Think RSS Is Dead: Lockdown

Why Google, Yahoo and Others Are Making You Think RSS Is Dead: Lockdown | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:


Marco Arment the creator of Instapaper, has an excellent and provocative piece on why Google is closing down all of its RSS appendages (they just closed also the RSS feeds in Google Alerts) and the logic behind this strategy.


He writes: "Officially, Google killed Reader because “over the years usage has declined”.1 I believe that statement, especially if API clients weren’t considered “usage”, but I don’t believe that’s the entire reason.

The most common assumption I’ve seen others cite is that “Google couldn’t figure out how to monetize Reader,” or other variants about direct profitability. I don’t believe this, either. Google Reader’s operational costs likely paled in comparison to many of their other projects that don’t bring in major revenue, and I’ve heard from multiple sources that it effectively had a staff of zero for years. It was just running, quietly serving a vital role for a lot of people."


"The bigger problem is that they’ve abandoned interoperability. RSS, semantic markup, microformats, and open APIs all enable interoperability, but the big players don’t want that — they want to lock you in, shut out competitors, and make a service so proprietary that even if you could get your data out, it would be either useless (no alternatives to import into) or cripplingly lonely (empty social networks).


Google resisted this trend admirably for a long time and was very geek- and standards-friendly, but not since Facebook got huge enough to effectively redefine the internet and refocus Google’s plans to be all-Google+, all the time.4"


Provides better perspective on RSS, Google, FB and Twitter and your future relationship with RSS.



Must-read article. 9/10


Full article: http://www.marco.org/2013/07/03/lockdown


(Image credit - RSS logo - Shutterstock)



Ashish Rishi's curator insight, July 4, 2013 11:49 PM

Love you Marco!!!  Agreed  and couldn't have asked for more. Internet to me was the ultimate democratization tool , a leveler, a ground playing field that challenged all institutions that had unnecessary walls around them - say educational institutions , you loved them, but they were for a fortunate few. Internet platforms  ( including google) were formed for the love of internet, they have milked it enough and why not ? but now these guys are trying to become to old school walled gardens, I just hope that in doing so , they don't lose the charm that defines them.

Laura Brown's comment, July 6, 2013 2:43 PM
This is like the AOL model of the Internet which they offered years ago. People thought they were online but they were only online via AOL which mean AOL controlled what they say, how they saw it, etc. Many people were fine with the AOL version of the Internet. People who just wanted to look at email and use chat forums for personal reason and put up a personal home page, etc. However, the people who did not like being restricted or confined choose to opt out of AOL and use other ISP's (Internet Service Providers). I'm not surprised Google wants to take several steps back and go that way, take control of what people are allowed to see and make sure the ads are featured versus having the option to block them. They have already gone several steps backwards in bringing back pop up ads. No one seems to protest those, or the video and other bulky ads which take up a lot of bandwidth. People had a large voice against all that when it was still the artists, scientists and other geeks who ruled online. Now it is the marketers and the Internet reflects the change in a big way. It's like one big ad soup. Google just wants to tie it all up in a neat bundle.