Content Curation World
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Content Curation World
What a Content Curator Needs To Know: How, Tools, Issues and Strategy
Curated by Robin Good
Author: Robin Good   Google+
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Curate Beautiful-Looking List-Based Slideshows with Quietly

Robin Good's insight:


Quietly is a new web-based app which allows you to create beautiful list-based slideshows which can be shared and embedded on any website.


Each card in a Quietly slideshow can be made up by a:

- website - from which you can pick any image

- an image - which you can search or upload

- a location on the map

- a name, a URL and a description

The user can also customize font styling, the cover image, and many other visual components of his slideshow.


Quietly creates a beautiful profile page for each publisher, from which one can access all of his slideshow lists as well as the main feed. 

Quietly curators can also easily pick any *slide* from other lists and add it to anyone of their existing ones. 


*An excellent tool to organize and present list-based information in a visual slideshow format. Very easy to use. Cool, quiet interface, makes working with it a pleasant task. Creates pro-looking presence for list publishers while allowing to embed created lists anywhere.


Free to use.




Try it out now: http://beta.quiet.ly/ 


Video tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=94acAlUPHhE&list=PLEDUVwz2J2SWYAAdeZ2JRU4-Wsi3p2uBo&index=1


Example list: http://beta.quiet.ly/list/9095-25-awesome-things-to-do-in-vancouver- 


Similar tools: http://List.ly 


more...
Lon Naylor's curator insight, October 8, 2014 4:38 PM

Online tool lets you create "lists" consisting of a cover slide, images. website links...might make for some nice content reports and screen capture video.

Jerri Lynn Hogg's curator insight, October 10, 2014 9:42 AM

Excellent visual way to create a list of information from url to location and descriptors.

Linda Kaiser, PhD's curator insight, October 10, 2014 3:25 PM

This video tutorial is one of a series.  This particular tools looks to be another useful curation tool that is image-based.

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Google Search Starts To Reward Curators, Collections and Quality Lists

Robin Good: In the overall effort to improve the quality of its search engine result pages Google is continuining to make significant improvements to its search engine.

Starting from now all users worldwide can see Knowledge Graph results showing up on top of search results as a visuable and browsable list of alternative options to explore.


Not only.


Google is now officially goig after the gathering and curation of the best list, collections and guides on just about any topic.

From the official Google Blog. Read it carefully: "Finally, the best answer to your question is not always a single entity, but a list or group of connected things.


It’s quite challenging to pull these lists automatically from the web. But we’re now beginning to do just that.


So when you search for [california lighthouses], [hurricanes in 2008] or [famous female astronomers], we’ll show you a list of these things across the top of the page. And by combining our Knowledge Graph with the collective wisdom of the web, we can even provide more subjective lists like [best action movies of the 2000s] or [things to do in paris]."



Very interesting. 8/10


Read more about it: http://googleblog.blogspot.it/2012/08/building-search-engine-of-future-one.html



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Prasanth (WN)'s comment, August 10, 2012 10:23 AM
Thanks
Archeology Rome's comment, August 10, 2012 10:24 AM
Interesting, thanks.
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The Value of List-Making: Three Traits To Make Yours Stand Out From The Rest

The Value of List-Making: Three Traits To Make Yours Stand Out From The Rest | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:


Beth Kanter, one of the key go-to-person for communication strategy when it comes to NGOs, provides a useful reminder of the value of creating lists for content marketing objectives alongside some good links to list-making examples and list-building tools. 



My comment: One thing that differentiates good "lists" from bad ones, is not often visibile by looking just at the surface.


Good lists in my view are characterized by these three traits: 


1) Short - long lists are tiring and not very useful


2) Categorized - "groups" help scanning and finding what you're looking for


3) Commented - excerpts from about pages as list item descriptions are not very useful, as what makes a real difference in a list is your insight, opinion or evaluation into why that item is in that list. 


Without these elements in fact, just about anyone can take a search tool and assemble the "Best of" whatever software category in a ridicule amount of time, while not really providing anything useful or reliable. 


That's the difference between a list and a curated list.


The list "as is" makes you work more to check and verify everything that's in the list, while the curated one saves you time in finding or reminding you rapidly what is exactly that you need.



Useful. Resourceful. 7/10



Original post: http://www.bethkanter.org/lists/ 






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Prof. Hankell's curator insight, September 28, 2013 11:27 AM

Robin Good's insight:

Beth Kanter, one of the key go-to-person for communication strategy when it comes to NGOs, provides a useful reminder of the value of creating lists for content marketing objectives alongside some good links to list-making examples and list-building tools.


My comment: One thing that differentiates good "lists" from bad ones, is not often visibile by looking just at the surface.

Good lists in my view are characterized by these three traits:

1) Short - long lists are tiring and not very useful

2) Categorized - "groups" help scanning and finding what you're looking for

3) Commented - excerpts from about pages as list item descriptions are not very useful, as what makes a real difference in a list is your insight, opinion or evaluation into why that item is in that list.

Without these elements in fact, just about anyone can take a search tool and assemble the "Best of" whatever software category in a ridicule amount of time, while not really providing anything useful or reliable.

That's the difference between a list and a curated list.

The list "as is" makes you work more to check and verify everything that's in the list, while the curated one saves you time in finding or reminding you rapidly what is exactly that you need.

Beth Kanter's comment, September 28, 2013 12:47 PM
Thanks for adding your valuable insights that lead to improved curation practice.