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What a Content Curator Needs To Know: How, Tools, Issues and Strategy
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Past Volume To Value: That's How The Future of Journalism Should Be - Keynote by Jeff Jarvis at #ijf15

To hell with mass media. Journalism, properly conceived, is a service, not a content factory. As such, news must be built on relationships with individuals a...
Robin Good's insight:


At the recent International Journalism Festival in Perugia, Italy, Jeff Jarvis, Professor of Journalism at CUNY, gave a keynote speech that provides valuable insight and advice as to where the future of news and journalism are headed. 


While the full keynote and the Q&A with the audience is recorded in full in this 55' mins long video, I have summarised here below his key points and takeaways, so that you can get at least a good basic idea of his viewpoints in under 3 mins.


The value of this keynote for content curators is the fact that Jeff Jarvis highlights and validates a process, mission and approach where the ability to collect, vet and curate information, resources and tools, to satisfy a specific need, is going to take a much more central and important role in the development of new forms journalism and in the evolution of the business models that will support it. 



Jeff Jarvis' Key 15 Takeaways on the Future of Journalism:



1. Mass audiences don't exist. 

This is just a way to look at people that served the mass media industry model.


2. Journalism is in the service business.

We must fundamentally rethink the way we produce the news, so that they actually serve specific people needs.


3. Journalism needs to specialise. 
Do what you do best and link to the rest. 


4. Relationships and listening

Need to listen and create relationships with their community

Need to understand what the problems and needs and intercept them


5. Journalists need to become community advocates 

Need to change how we evaluate waht we do as journalists

Must help people to make sense 


6. Community.

Move from media-centric to community-centric

Go to the community first, to observe, to ask and listen, before creating content that serve their needs


7. Membership.

This is not about subscriptions.

It is about collaboration and what we do with the community we serve.

People don't want to belong to a media organisation.

People want to be part of true passionate communities.

Community can contribute: Content, effort, marketing, resources, ideas, feedback, customer assistance, etc.


8. Beyond articles. 

Continuous live blogging, tweeting, data, etc.

There a lot more formats that can be used to create valuable content. 


9. Mobile is not about content delivery.

Mobile is about use cases

re-organise the news around the public specific needs we would create higher value that by following our own production cycle.

What about if we broke up news in hundreds of different use cases that specifically apply to mobile? 

For example: give me all the world news that count in 2 mins. 

Or: I want to know everything that happens about this story, in real-time

or: I want to connect with members of my community and accomplish something


10. We've to re-invent TV news

TV news sucks.

There is a lot of untapped tech that we can use.

Great opportunities to do better.


11. Business Models - Digital first

Every journalist is fully digital. 

Print comes after digital.

Print no longer rules the culture of a newspaper.


12. The traditional (ad-based) mass media business model kills journalism.

By importing the old business model of mass media onto the Internet, with reach and frequency, mass, scale, volume, we have corrupted journalism.

Clicks will inevitably lead to cats.

If your goal is more clicks you will put up more cats.

We have to move past volume, to value. 

We need give more relevance to our readers.

And we can do so only if we get to know them as individual members of a true communities. 


13. Paywalls are not the way to go.

The idea of selling content online doesn't work very well. Unless you are Bloomberg or someone who sells information that is very fresh and valuable for a specific need.


14. Native advertising is not going to save us.

Rather, with it, we may giving up our true last values, as our own voices, authority and our ability to tell a story. If we fool our readers into thinking that native advertising comes from the same people who gives them the news, we have given up our last asset. Credibility.


15. Rethink the metrics. 

Views, clicks, likes are no longer appropriate.

Attention is a better metric. (see Chartbeat).

The metric that is count to count most is going to be more qualitative than quantitative and it is going to be about whether we are valuable in people's lives. I don't know how to measure that, but we need to find out how to do it. 



My comment: This is a must-watch video for any journalist seriously interested in getting a better feel for the direction and focus that news and journalism will take. 


Insightful. 10/10



Original video: https://youtu.be/RsPvnVeo1G0 
(55':30")
Keynote: 0:00 to 29:43
Audience Q&A: 30:00 to 55:30 






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Gilbert C FAURE's curator insight, May 2, 2015 12:08 PM

for students in journalism near me

Serge Dielens * Branding * Reputation * Influence * Inbound Marketing Communication expert @ EdgeCommunication.be *'s curator insight, May 5, 2015 12:26 PM

Ce que la ("grande") Presse a peut-être oublié à un moment donné...victime de son arrogance/abondance?

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Six Key Content Curation Insights Emerging from the Leaked NY Times Executive Summary

Six Key Content Curation Insights Emerging from the Leaked NY Times Executive Summary | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
It's an astonishing look inside the cultural change still needed in the shift to digital — even in one of the world's greatest newsrooms. Read it.
Robin Good's insight:



The leaked New York Times memo of less than a week ago is making the round on the Internet, as it touches upon many of the key issues and opportunities any news journalism operation is facing today.


From my personal viewpoint the most interesting aspect of this lengthy 97-page memo is how much curation, news and content curation specifically, are part of the future view being described in it.


Since, even trying read the in-depth curated version of the leaked NY report done by the excellent Nieman Lab it may take you in excess of 30 minutes, I have extracted and highlighted here below only the points that are specifically relevant to curators and to anyone researching the future of content curation within the context of news and journalism.

Here, six key points to pay strong attention to:


  1. ...resurfacing archival content. The report cites this passage: "“We can be both a daily newsletter and a library — offering news every day, as well as providing context, relevance and timeless works of journalism.” 


  2. ...restructuring arts and culture stories that remain relevant long after they are initially published into guides for readers.


  3.  ...consider tools to make it easier for journalists, and maybe even readers, to create collections and repackage the content.


  4.  allow readers to easily follow certain topics or columnists.


  5. better tagging of the info and content being published.


  6. focus on the less glamorous work of creating tools, templates and permanent fixes that cumulatively can have a bigger impact by saving our digital journalists time and elevating the whole report.



Nieman Lab curated report of the NY leaked Executive Summary document: http://www.niemanlab.org/2014/05/the-leaked-new-york-times-innovation-report-is-one-of-the-key-documents-of-this-media-age/ 



Original leaked copy of NY report: http://www.scribd.com/doc/224608514/The-Full-New-York-Times-Innovation-Report 

97-pages




 

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A Mix of Algorithms and Human Curators Is The Solution To Content Curation Scalability Issue

A Mix of Algorithms and Human Curators Is The Solution To Content Curation Scalability Issue | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Guillame DeCugis: "This is a very interesting piece by Erin Griffith (again!) on the potential scalability issues of content curation. You can pass quickly on her first part where she easily bashes the usual concerns about the curation word being overhyped and over used.


She makes a really good point on her second part, building on the experience of Behance, the platform to publish one's creative work: using a mix of algorithms and human curation is a part of the answer to this scale issue. 


But another way to scale curation is to add a topic-centric layer. In the problem she describes (which is typically Behance's problem), scaling up is tough because curation is being applied to sort out the best content on a unique dimension: a home page that's the same for everyone.


"Behance’s front page could no longer display what algorithms determined was the most popular art within [the] site’s community. Because of boobs. They are universally the most popular thing on the Web, and not even a tasteful, creative site like Behance is safe when the “wisdom of the crowd” is involved.


To be clear — boobs are welcome on Behance, but the site skews toward commercially viable work. A porn pit may entice creative directors but not in the way Behance wants to entice them." she funnily writes.


If you added topics to that, you can solve the problem by having people follow whichever topics they want.


And I'm not talking about the usual 10-20 categories you find on any content sites. I'm talking about long-tail, user-created topics that any user can opt in to follow or unfollow. Boobs fans can then follow dozens of Boobs topics curated by other fellow users without having to pollute the experience for everyone else.


By mixing a topic-centric model with curation, you apply it to as many dimensions as your users will decide to curate. That's the model we've been using at Scoop.it and so far, it scales pretty well, doesn't it?"


Robin Good: For the record you may want to check this video of Gabe Rivera from Techmeme at LeWeb 2008 already discussing this issue and arriving at the same conclusions: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T4Zi_U6iZxU there's no way to build a perfect news or aggregation engine. The best solution is indeed a mix of aggregation and filtering tools matched by a topic-expert curator.





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What Is Curation and Why It's So Relevant? [Video]

Robin Good: A great video animation introducing some of the key ideas, dreams and concepts behind content curation.

 

From the video: "One of the most beautiful things about the Internet is this sort of radical discovery, where you start in a place that you are familiar with, that you trust, and then you drill down and down and chase the white rabbit and then you end up in some wonderland you didn't know existed.


The clip includes thoughts from some unique curators, picked and selected by Percolate, the company sponsoring this video. 


Inspiring. Insightful. 8/10


Find out more / watch original video: http://vimeo.com/38524181   

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Content Curation Is the New Community Builder

Content Curation Is the New Community Builder | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Great post written by Eric Brown for Social Media Explorer - This is what caught my attention:

 

Curation — the act of human editors adding their work to the machines that gather, organize and filter content.

 

“Curation comes up when search stops working,” says author and NYU Professor Clay Shirky. But it’s more than a human-powered filter.

 

“Curation comes up when people realize that it isn’t just about information seeking, it’s also about synchronizing a community.”

 

Part of the reason that human curation is so critical is simply the vast number of people who are now making and sharing media.

 

“Everyone is a media outlet”, says Shirky. “The point of everyone being a media outlet is really not at all complicated. It just means that we can all put things out in the public view.


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Humans More than Google Set To Become Key Trusted Sources of News

Humans More than Google Set To Become Key Trusted Sources of News | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



It is only a matter of time before trusted aggregators and human curators will become the main sources of reliable information for most people.

In fact, the January release of the 2015 Edelman Trust Barometer shows that for the first time ever, the informed public trusts more search engines - aka Google - than traditional news and media outlets. 


In other words, most people prefer to see a filtered and selected variety of news from different sources, than seeing just the stories coming out of one news publisher.


Even more interesting is the fact that "Seventy-two percent trust information posted by friends and family on social media, blogs and other digital sites, while 70 percent trust content posted by academic experts." as it highlights the fact that Google and search engines may be only an intermediary step in the journey toward a news ecosystem that will see trusted human editors, experts and curators for individual subjects who aggregate and curate content from multiple sources as the key reference points for news.




This is must-read data for anyone interested in seeing where the future of news and search are headed.


Enlightening data. 9/10



original article:  http://www.edelman.com/post/intellectual-property-trust-age-digital-media/ 






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Kathleen Gradel's curator insight, February 5, 2015 8:14 PM

Click to Robin Good's Scoop.it, for his astute comments on this article: http://curation.masternewmedia.org/

Harold Thwaites's curator insight, February 7, 2015 3:42 AM

Better humans than GOOGLE..... YES!

Catherine Hol's curator insight, February 7, 2015 12:03 PM

People have less trust in "owned media", and want information from a variety of sources online.

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From News as Reporting To News as a Gateway To Learn In Depth About a Topic

From News as Reporting To News as a Gateway To Learn In Depth About a Topic | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



It's the second time that I go back to this insightful article by Jonathan Stray, dating back to 2011, but which was visionary and rightful then as it is still now. The first time I did, right after it came out, I didn't actually realize in full how relevant and important was the idea being communicated through it.


On the surface the article talks about an hypotethical Editorial Search Engine as a desirable news app. But if you look just beyond the surface, which is by itself fascinating, in essence, Mr. Stray indicates how useful and effective it would be if news publishers moved on from reporting and into 100% curated coverage of a certain topic, issue or story, opening a fascinating discovery gateway around each story and allowing in time for these streams to intersect and interconnect with each other.


By doing this, we can not only make the news much more interesting and relevant, but we can transform them into instruments for in-depth learning about anything we are interested in.


In this light the future of news could be very much about Comprehensively Informing an Audience on a Specific Topic. And if you stop enough time to re-read it and think about it, this is a pretty powerful and revolutionary concept by itself.


He specifically writes: "Rather than (always, only) writing stories, we should be trying to solve the problem of comprehensively informing the user on a particular topic."


"Choose a topic and start with traditional reporting, content creation, in-house explainers and multimedia stories. Then integrate a story-specific search engine that gathers together absolutely everything else that can be gathered on that topic, and applies whatever niche filtering, social curation, visualization, interaction and communication techniques are most appropriate."


Jonathan Stray makes also a very inspiring connection to Jay Rosen of NYU and his idea of covering 100% of a story which in my view correctly anticipated the niche content curation trend while going beyond it in its effort to explore gateways to innovation. 

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Insightful. Visionary. Inspiring. 9/10

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Kristina Schneider's curator insight, October 26, 2013 1:36 PM

"Rather than (always, only) writing stories, we should be trying to solve the problem of comprehensively informing the user on a particular topic."

Yes! 

Michael Britt's comment, October 27, 2013 12:27 PM
I think the points above are excellent. I only wish "content consumers" if you will, agreed with this message. I say that because I have been critisized by one consumer because he didn't feel that I gave him ENOUGH content on a topic. In other words, in many content consumer's minds, A LOT OF CONTENT = VALUE. Hopefully the public is going to realize that this is not true.
Stephen Dale's curator insight, October 29, 2013 1:56 PM

A useful article on the  role of journalists by Jonathan Stray. He postulates that rather than writing stories, journalists should be trying to solve the problem of comprehensively informing the user on a particular topic, by applying filtering, social curation, visualistion and interaction with their audience. I think the professional press has woken up to this, and commend the Guardian for their insightful reporting. 

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How To Check and Verify News Info in Real-Time from Social Media

How To Check and Verify News Info in Real-Time from Social Media | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

From the article intro: "Over the past couple of years, I’ve been trying to collect every good piece of writing and advice about verifying social media content and other types of information that flow across networks.


This form of verification involves some new tools and techniques, and requires a basic understanding of the way networks operate and how people use them.


It also requires many of the so-called old school values and techniques that have been around for a while: being skeptical, asking questions, tracking down high quality sources, exercising restraint, collaborating and communicating with team members.


For example, lots of people talk about how Andy Carvin does crowdsourced verification and turns his Twitter feed into a real time newswire."


Mindy McAdams writes: "Verifying social media content “involves some new tools and techniques, and requires a basic understanding of the way networks operate and how people use them. It also requires many of the so-called old school values and techniques that have been around for a while: being skeptical, asking questions, tracking down high quality sources, exercising restraint, collaborating and communicating with team members.


"Craig Silverman provides an introduction to the topic and then an annoatated list of eight articles/blog posts that add clarity and examples."

Full article:  http://www.poynter.org/latest-news/regret-the-error/171713/8-must-reads-that-detail-how-to-verify-content-from-twitter-other-social-media/ 

(Thanks to Mindy McAdams and Steve Buttry - Image credit: newgenerationsales.com) 

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How Can We Build Better Filters for Growing Flows of Information?

How Can We Build Better Filters for Growing Flows of Information? | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

 Nicola Bruno, cofounder of Effecinque and a journalist fellow at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at the University of Oxford) goes the startup route "with the intent of being relentless hunters of news and human filters of information."...

 

Heres what got my attention:

 

As the digital flood sweeps into our lives every imaginable kind of information, much of it offering nothing more than a smoke screen to blur or distort our view, figuring this out is crucial.

 

Who or what can help us see beyond the smoke? Will software like Stats Monkey give us reason to believe that we are swimming only in facts with its mechanical certainty? And what will be the role of journalists in a media landscape in which reporters and news items are little more than commodities, and, in the case of reporters, a soon-to-be redundancy?

 

 

http://www.niemanlab.org/2011/09/from-nieman-reports-how-can-we-build-better-filters-for-growing-flows-of-information/


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In Selecting The Best News, Humans Beat Robots, at Last!

In Selecting The Best News, Humans Beat Robots, at Last! | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Lots of people might know about this, some do not, no matter what, it's still good to see it in print.  Human curation works and will play a significant role on the web.

 

Excerpt: After almost a decade, Google is somewhat sheepishly admitting that humans are, well, useful after all.

 

What Google is embracing -- finally -- is the emergence of human curation as a central and critical editorial effort in the increasingly noisy web. Curation, it seems, trumps robots when it comes to both interestingness and editorial tone and voice.

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/steve-rosenbaum/google-news-humans-beat-r_b_926641.html


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