Content Curation World
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Content Curation World
What a Content Curator Needs To Know: How, Tools, Issues and Strategy
Curated by Robin Good
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Why I Don't Like Scoopit Links on Twitter

Why I Don't Like Scoopit Links on Twitter | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

I’m seeing more Scoopit links in my Twitter stream and I’m not crazy about it.  Sure it’s quick and easy to share with Scoopit.  But it not quick and easy to consume. For me it's all about the econ...

Marty Note (here is comment I wrote on Dr. V's blog)

Appreciate Bryan’s and Joseph’s comment, but I rarely use Scoop.it as a pass through. More than 90% of the time I’m adding “rich snippets” to content I Scoop.

Rich snippets are “blog” posts that fall between Twitter and the 500 to 1,000 words I would write in Scenttrail Marketing. I often create original content ON Scoop.it because whatever I’m writing falls in the crack between Twitter’s micro blog and what I think of as needing to be on my marketing blog.


I was taught NOT to pass through links on Scoop.it early on by the great curator @Robin Good . Robin has well over 1M views on Scoop.it now and his advice along with the patient advice of other great Scoop.it curators has my profile slouching toward 150,000 views.


Bryan is correct that some curators new to Scoop.it haven’t learned the Robin Good lesson yet. I agree it is frustrating to go to a link and not receive anything of value back, to simply need to click on another link. Curators who pass through links won’t scale, so the Darwinian impact will be they will learn to add value or die out.


For my part I always identify my Scoop.it links, probably about half the content I Tweet and about a quarter of my G+ shares. I also routinely share my favorite “Scoopiteers”, great content curators who taught me valuable lessons such as don’t simply pass through links but add “micro blogging” value via rich snippets.


When you follow or consistently share content from a great curator on Scooop.it you begin to understand HOW they shape the subjects they curate. I know, for example, Robin Good is amazing on new tools. Scoop.it anticipated this learning and built in a feature where I can suggest something to Robin.


This is when Scoop.it is at its most crowdsourcing best because I now have an army of curators who know I like to comment on and share content about design or BI or startups and they (other Scoopiteers) keep an eye out for me. There are several reasons Scoop.it is a “get more with less effort” tool and this crowdsourcing my curation is high on the list.


So, sorry you are sad to see Scoop.it links and understand your frustration. You’ve correctly identified the problem too – some curators don’t know how to use the tool yet. I know it is a lot to ask to wait for the Darwinian learning that will take place over generations, but Scoop.it and the web have “generations” that have the half life of a gnat so trust that the richness of the Scoop.it community will win in the end and “the end” won’t take long.


To my fellow Scoop.it curators we owe Bryan and Joseph thanks for reminding us of what Robin Good taught me – add value or your Scoop.it won’t scale. That lessons is applicable to much more than how we use Scoop.it.


Marty

Added to G+ too
https://plus.google.com/102639884404823294558/posts/TUsNtsAsjWp

 


Via Martin (Marty) Smith
Robin Good's insight:

Well, I can't really agree more with Marty's point.

On the other hand Scoop.it, and a number of similar platforms,  are heavily promoted as a content marketing platforms that promise to a) save you time and b) allow you to post more content.

And then, unless you heavily moderate and surface editorial models that can guide other users, you tend to level down to the lowest common denominator. 

This is what I see happening and I regret it as well.

Thanks Marty for highlighting it. 

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Karen Dietz's comment, August 22, 2014 2:07 PM
Right on Marty! I'm re-scooping this as a way to help that learning along about how to really use Scoop.it well and leverage it.
Karen Dietz's curator insight, August 22, 2014 2:25 PM

FYI Folks -- I trust that the reviews I write about the articles I curate help people along in their business storytelling journey. I know that there are many curators out there who do not add reviews/comments to the articles they highlight. 


As a result, Scoop.it and other curation sites are getting a backlash because audience members are tired of getting a link to an article that brings them to Scoop.it, and then requires another click to get to the article. Now I know that is annoying. And there is nothing of value offered between clicks.


Marty's response to the original blog post is right on. Read it along with all the other comments. Truly illuminating.


Other than a rant for me, what's the value of this post to you and business storytelling?


Namely this -- no matter what medium you use -- blogging, curating, digital storytelling -- make sure you are actually adding value for your audience. Expand their knowledge, give them tools, show them how, and offer your excellent insights. The stories you share have to connect to your audience in these ways. Anything else is a waste.


All of these posts and reviews add up to telling your story in a big picture way. So thanks Marty for addressing this issue, and reminding us about principles for quality curation. I've learned a lot from both you and Robin!


Karen Dietz

Bob Connelly's comment, November 23, 2014 7:11 PM
Being new to Scoop.it, I was glad to read this. I wouldn't have thought about this...
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News Curation - Back To The Future [2006]: Marshall Kirkpatrick and the Human News Aggregator Interview [mp3]

Robin Good: Digging back into my article archives I have just run into a special gem, dating back to 2006.


Thanks to the curious and entrepreneurial spirit of Marshall Kirkpatrick, in this short audio interview (6':21"), I get to explain what was my vision then (six years ago) for what we now call "news curation".


Missing any better term for something that had no previous history of practice, at the time I had labelled "newsmaster" the news-curator professional, and "newsradar" the final output (a finely-tuned thematic news channel bringing you the best from many different sources).


The interview had been done for the web magazine NetSquared and you can find more info about this and a full transcription of the interview right here: http://www.masternewmedia.org/news/2006/05/24/the_human_news_aggregator_an.htm


Let me know what you think.


Update: Right after I had posted this short story, I went to check a bit how my old friend Marshall Kirkpatrick, author of the above interview, was doing, and headed to his blog... and what I discovered left me startled and enthusiastic at the same time. Read it by yourself: http://marshallk.com/were-entering-a-golden-age-of-news-geekery


Isn't the world amazing?


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Marshall's comment, August 5, 2012 1:19 PM
Robin, that is too funny that we were both thinking of that old interview! I still love your vision from back then of curation specialists inside companies. Hope you're well, old friend!
Robin Good's comment, August 5, 2012 2:13 PM
Hi Marshall, great to hear from you! Yes, we seem to be still in sync after all these years and for good reasons too.

I am well and I wish you all the best in what you are doing! Keep it up.
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Sending People To See Other Sites Works: One Million Page Views Just by Curating Content

Sending People To See Other Sites Works: One Million Page Views Just by Curating Content | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

http://www.MasterNewMedia.org/

Robin Good's insight:



I always say: "Traffic is worth zero". In fact, unless I am skilled enough to convert the one million page views that Scoop.it reports on my profile into loyal readers and paying customers this figure by itself could be worth nothing.


What it does say though, to the many of you wondering whether you can reach people interested in your specific topic by curating other people's content is that, Yes, it is very possible to reach a very targeted audience in this way. By using a publishing platform like Scoop.it and having a regular, systematic posting schedule does bring extra visibility, credit and reputation. And the more focus you have, the better.


Robert Scoble was right when he suggested, way before than anyone was even thinking about curation, to send visitors off to other sites by curating the best that is out there. 


But don't look at me as the example to follow. For one thing, I do not think it is a great idea to cover these many different topics like I do. I have now over ten curated channels I maintain on Scoop.it and I really don't think this is a great idea (nonetheless I am very interested in all of them).


In the beginning you always feel constrained, and needing a ton of channels, but then, as you go along, you learn that to maintain even two of them, at a very high level of quality, requires a lot of manual effort and time.


I am very thankful to Scoop.it as I would have not been able to get all of this extra exposure and credit for my work, if I had been doing this curation work exclusively on my own site.


Being showcased inside a social platform, where other people are continuosly looking for new, valuable content, has its own advantages.


As a matter of fact, I will not get tired of saying that Scoop.it HAS its key greatest opportunity for improvement, not so much in adding new features or refining its mobile versions but in really starting to effectively curate and showcase its own treasure trove of stuff and by doing that, modelling for its own larger group of users how to elevate their curation work.


By doing this Scoop.it would not only become a true content destination of its own sake but it could also become a model for quality curated content for its own users, by cultivating and exposing outstanding quality over quantity.


http://www.scoop.it/u/RobinGood 


*If you are a subject matter expert and are interested in contributing to the curation of one of my Scoop.it channels, step up and let me hear from you (Robin.Good@masternewmedia.org)





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David Bennett's comment, August 30, 2013 7:37 AM
I put up a post in Light Reading (a WP.com blog) and gave you attribution and a mention:

http://photographworks.wordpress.com/2013/08/30/say-it-with-a-tweet/
Michael Ehline's comment, September 3, 2013 9:04 AM
Man this one has gone viral. I see it everywhere.
harish magan's comment, September 3, 2013 10:21 AM
Ok I agree with you, let it be
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One Way To Curate The Breaking News [Video]

Robin Good: That's what I suggested back in 2008 to those who wanted to stay ahead of the game while doing breaking news coverage. 


Once again it is all about sifting through everything and gathering the best for a specific audience. It's all about quality, and nothing about speed.


Original video 4':31": http://youtu.be/f5KO24k9A9c 

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