Content Curation World
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Content Curation World
What a Content Curator Needs To Know: How, Tools, Issues and Strategy
Curated by Robin Good
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Argument Curation: An Effective Approach To Develop Critical Thinking Among Students

Argument Curation: An Effective Approach To Develop Critical Thinking Among Students | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:


Ashley Hutchinson has an excellent article on the NWP site, illustrating how content curation can be effectively used to move students from passively memorizing information that they have no interest into, to become active investigators of a topic to uncover its different facets and critical evaluators of the same in light of their own values. 


Her key goal was to find a way to make "research" something fun to do for her students. 


"I wanted students to be able to funnel their interests into a more authentic academic experience so that they could learn about what they want to learn about and become empowered as researchers, both casually and formally. 


To do that, I needed to remix their idea of what research is, transform it from something boring and arbitrary into something rich and useful.


When I don't know something, I look it up...  So I called this an "argument curation" project, and not just to sound fancy; they were actually identifying arguments and curating resources that helped inform those arguments." 


The beauty of this approach is that students need to check and research the different aspects of a story, to see it through and to develop their own viewpoint relative to it.  And here is the a good example of how this can be achieved: 


"...They had to find the resources and think carefully about what the resources were actually saying, so that their collections contained diverse opinions and ways of expressing them. 


...On their websites, they described the general topic, created page for five different arguments and gave a breakdown of why people are debating those topics. 


Then they had to set out to find resources, but not just any resources, resources that had different perspectives. Even those that were in contention with their own. 


After gathering at least three resources on five different argument topics within their area of interest, the students summarized the perspectives they saw in the diverse resources that they found. 


After being exposed to all of these resources and having some time to think, they themselves entered into the conversation by giving their opinion and referencing the sources that helped inform their opinion. 


By having a conversation with their resources, students found themselves **thinking** instead of repeating, synthesizing instead of summarizing."

  

I don't want to spoil any further your reading of the original which includes some inspiring info about the effects that such an approach can have on students and on their ability to look at the information that they are exposed to.  


Excellent resource for educators considering curation in their program.   


Insightful. Useful. 9/10 


Full article: http://digitalis.nwp.org/resource/5227




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Alfredo Corell's curator insight, October 3, 2013 5:48 PM

An excellent story for lecturers or teachers thinking in content curation as a tool in their aulas.

Fiona Harvey's curator insight, October 8, 2013 2:22 AM

Useful for educators - key digital literacy skill

johanna krijnsen's curator insight, December 4, 2013 2:00 PM

content curation and critical thinking skills

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Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics

Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics | Content Curation World | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Must-read article on ClutterMuseum.com by Leslie M-B, exploring in depth the opportunity to have students master their selected topics by "curating" them, rather than by reading and memorizing facts about them.


"Critical and creative thinking should be prioritized over remembering content"


"That students should learn to think for themselves may seem like a no-brainer to many readers, but if you look at the textbook packages put out by publishers, you’ll find that the texts and accompanying materials (for both teachers and students) assume students are expected to read and retain content—and then be tested on it.


Instead, between middle school (if not earlier) and college graduation, students should practice—if not master—how to question, critique, research, and construct an argument like an historian."


This is indeed the critical point. Moving education from an effort to memorize things on which then to be tested, to a collaborative exercise in creating new knowledge and value by pulling and editing together individual pieces of content, resources and tools that allow the explanation/illustration of a topic from a specific viewpoint/for a specific need.


And I can't avoid to rejoice and second her next proposition: "What if we shifted the standards’ primary emphasis from content, and not to just the development of traditional skills—basic knowledge recall, document interpretation, research, and essay-writing—but to the cultivation of skills that challenge students to make unconventional connections, skills that are essential for thriving in the 21st century?"


What are these skills, you may ask. Here is a good reference where to look them up: http://www.p21.org/storage/documents/P21_Framework_Definitions.pdf (put together by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills)



Recommended. Good stuff. 9/10


Full article: www.cluttermuseum.com/make-students-curators/


(Image credit: Behance.net)



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Education Creations's curator insight, May 12, 2014 12:00 AM

How to turn students into curators.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:14 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing, but they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access any social media, but rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we could start thinking about what is possible and lobbying for change.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:18 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. Using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing. But they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any age, and any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access social media. But rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we should start thinking about what is possible, and lobbying for change. Could you use a Scoop.it collection as an assessment task?

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Curation, as a Pedagogical Tool To Embolden Critical Thinking in Education

Curation, as a Pedagogical Tool To Embolden Critical Thinking in Education | Content Curation World | Scoop.it
Exploring Curation as a core competency in digital and media literacy education
Robin Good's insight:



Paul Mihailidis, has an interesting essay on "Exploring Curation as a Core Competency in Digital an Media Literacy Education" in which he offers "a prospective attempt to build curation into the media literacy conversation..." by analyzing the analyzing effective curation practices, and six highly relevant teaching points for using a news curation tool like Storify in the classroom.


His essay "seeks to encourage instructors, particularly on secondary and tertiary education levels, to bridge the gap between informal learning outside of the classroom with formal learning to create a more dynamic place for students to advance critical inquiry, dialogue, and engagement through new forms of content creation, curation, and dissemination."


He writes: "Through student-driven, creation-driven, collective and integrated teaching approaches to curation, the framework aims to build towards savvy media consumption and production, critical evaluation and analysis, and participation in local, national and global dialog.


The framework also addresses the ability to see diversity and civic voice as core competencies in the curation process.


As students learn to build cohesive stories and ideas from a wide variety of sources, they can learn about the diverse types of content that inform a story, and the avenues they have-through social media tools and platforms-to be part of the discussion."


Curation can be an extremely effective approach to develop critical thinking skills and practices, as it forces students to evaluate, vet, verify and decide what really matters.


"When students develop a credible list of professional and personal sources around an issue and/or event, they must acknowledge how much subjective weight they place on a tweet, a blog, or a Facebook post and in relative comparison to an advocacy group, cable television operation, or news service. Arguing for the credibility of a myriad of voices online forces students to build valuable justifications for what they choose to believe, and why."



Informative. Examples-rich. Educationally useful. 8/10


Full essay: http://www-jime.open.ac.uk/jime/article/viewArticle/2013-02/html




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Diana Juárez's curator insight, April 26, 2015 1:27 PM

La curación como herramienta pedagógica para propiciar el pensamiento crítico en la educación.

Bárbara Mónica Pérez Moo's curator insight, August 12, 2015 9:16 AM

Habilidades digitales y pensamiento crítico.

Gilbert C FAURE's curator insight, August 13, 2015 8:37 AM

of course!

2013

good link

http://www-jime.open.ac.uk/articles/10.5334/2013-02/

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Curators Key Requirement: Critical Thinking

Robin Good: Critical thinking is a key strategic skill needed by any serious professional curator. 


"Critical thinking provides the keys for our own intellectual independence..." and it helps to move away from "rashy conclusions, mystification and reluctance to question received wisdom, authority and tradition" while learning how to adopt "intellectual discipline" and a way to express clearly ideas while taking personal responsibility for them.


Key takeaways from this video:


  • Critical thinking refers to a diverse range of intellectual skills and activities concerned with "evaluating information" as well as our own thought in a disciplined way.
     
  • Critical thinking is not just thinking a lot. To be an effective critical thinker you need to seek out and be guided by "knowledge" and "evidence" that fits with reality even if it refutes what the general consensus may want to believe.
     
  • Critical thinkers cultivate an attitude of curiosity and they are willing to do the work required to keep themselves informed about a subject.
     
  • Critical thinkers do not take claims at face value but utilize scepticism and doubt to suspend judgement and objectively evaluate with facts the claims being made.
     
  • Critical thinkers should evaluate information on the basis of reasoning and not by relying on emotions as claims the factuality of a claim cannot be solely based on the level of emotion that accompanies them or the fact that they may be believed by certain groups.


Highly recommended for all curators. 9/10

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6OLPL5p0fMg 


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Beth Kanter's comment, February 21, 2012 11:56 PM
Thank you for sharing this video and the importance of critical thinking. It is so easy to get into the mindless consumption trap and making ourselves slow down, read, think, question, and seek is so important. It is all about the resisting the urge to click, but to hit the pause button and make yourself think
Mayra Aixa Villar's comment, February 22, 2012 10:14 AM
Grazie come sempre, Robin! You always share valuable information and this video is a great source to reflect on the importance of critical thinking to refine thought processes when curating content. Content curation certainly requires and develops "better thinking".
Gregory Thackston's curator insight, March 17, 2013 4:54 PM

Critical thinking is a key component in addressing autonomous adversity and the need to collaborate in decision making.